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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]
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Management of refractory irritable bowel syndrome and comorbid mental ill-health: challenges, reflections and patient's perspective of life on the body-mind divide.

Thu, 2014-01-09 15:19
Related Articles

Management of refractory irritable bowel syndrome and comorbid mental ill-health: challenges, reflections and patient's perspective of life on the body-mind divide.

BMJ Case Rep. 2013;2013

Authors: Udo I, Gash A

Abstract
This complex case illustrates how blurred the divide between body and mind can be. In a patient with refractory irritable bowel symptoms, the emergence of new social problems exacerbate both psychiatric (anxiety and depression) and physical symptoms. Treatment of the physical symptomatology consisted of acute hospital treatments initially and subsequent primary care consultations. Psychiatric treatment consists of psychopharmacological (venlafaxine and mirtazapine) and psychotherapeutic approaches (cognitive behavioural therapy initially, and clinical hypnosis). The objectives of psychiatric treatment were to stabilise symptoms, reduce hospital admissions and foster self-management. The gains of management are presented. Social difficulties encountered over the period of treatment were legal processes to gain custody of son, bereavement, financial difficulties occasioned by stoppage of welfare benefits and legal processes involved in welfare appeal. Importantly, the patient's perceptive of treatment and care is presented. Detrimental effects that current welfare reforms in the UK may have on health are highlighted.

PMID: 23814199 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Pathological tremor prediction using surface electromyogram and acceleration: potential use in 'ON-OFF' demand driven deep brain stimulator design.

Thu, 2014-01-09 15:19
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Pathological tremor prediction using surface electromyogram and acceleration: potential use in 'ON-OFF' demand driven deep brain stimulator design.

J Neural Eng. 2013 Jun;10(3):036019

Authors: Basu I, Graupe D, Tuninetti D, Shukla P, Slavin KV, Metman LV, Corcos DM

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We present a proof of concept for a novel method of predicting the onset of pathological tremor using non-invasively measured surface electromyogram (sEMG) and acceleration from tremor-affected extremities of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and essential tremor (ET).
APPROACH: The tremor prediction algorithm uses a set of spectral (Fourier and wavelet) and nonlinear time series (entropy and recurrence rate) parameters extracted from the non-invasively recorded sEMG and acceleration signals.
MAIN RESULTS: The resulting algorithm is shown to successfully predict tremor onset for all 91 trials recorded in 4 PD patients and for all 91 trials recorded in 4 ET patients. The predictor achieves a 100% sensitivity for all trials considered, along with an overall accuracy of 85.7% for all ET trials and 80.2% for all PD trials. By using a Pearson's chi-square test, the prediction results are shown to significantly differ from a random prediction outcome.
SIGNIFICANCE: The tremor prediction algorithm can be potentially used for designing the next generation of non-invasive closed-loop predictive ON-OFF controllers for deep brain stimulation (DBS), used for suppressing pathological tremor in such patients. Such a system is based on alternating ON and OFF DBS periods, an incoming tremor being predicted during the time intervals when DBS is OFF, so as to turn DBS back ON. The prediction should be a few seconds before tremor re-appears so that the patient is tremor-free for the entire DBS ON-OFF cycle and the tremor-free DBS OFF interval should be maximized in order to minimize the current injected in the brain and battery usage.

PMID: 23658233 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Real-time fMRI neurofeedback: progress and challenges.

Thu, 2014-01-09 15:19
Related Articles

Real-time fMRI neurofeedback: progress and challenges.

Neuroimage. 2013 Aug 1;76:386-99

Authors: Sulzer J, Haller S, Scharnowski F, Weiskopf N, Birbaumer N, Blefari ML, Bruehl AB, Cohen LG, DeCharms RC, Gassert R, Goebel R, Herwig U, LaConte S, Linden D, Luft A, Seifritz E, Sitaram R

Abstract
In February of 2012, the first international conference on real time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI) neurofeedback was held at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETHZ), Switzerland. This review summarizes progress in the field, introduces current debates, elucidates open questions, and offers viewpoints derived from the conference. The review offers perspectives on study design, scientific and clinical applications, rtfMRI learning mechanisms and future outlook.

PMID: 23541800 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

EMG analysis of human inspiratory muscle resistance to fatigue during exercise.

Wed, 2014-01-08 06:15
Related Articles

EMG analysis of human inspiratory muscle resistance to fatigue during exercise.

Adv Exp Med Biol. 2013;788:197-205

Authors: Segizbaeva MO, Donina ZhA, Timofeev NN, Korolyov YN, Golubev VN, Aleksandrova NP

Abstract
The aim of this study was to characterize the pattern of inspiratory muscle fatigue and to assess the resistance to fatigue of the diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SCM), and scalene (SC) muscles. Nine healthy, untrained male subjects participated in this study. Electromyographic activity (EMG) of D, PS, SCM, and SC was recorded during an incremental cycling test to exhaustion (workload of 1.0 W/kg with 0.5 W/kg increments every 5 min). The before-to-after exercise measurements of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and EMG power spectrum changes were performed. The maximal inspiratory pressure declined about 8.1 % after exercise compared with that in the control condition (124.3 ± 8.5 vs. 114.2 ± 8.9 cmH2O) (P > 0.05), whereas the peak magnitude of integrated electrical activity of D, PS, SCM, and SC during the post-exercise Müller maneuver was significantly greater in all subjects than that pre-exercise. The extent of inspiratory muscles fatigue was evaluated by analysis of a shift in centroid frequency (fc) of EMG power spectrum. Exercise-induced D fatigue was present in three subjects and PS fatigue was another in two; whereas both D and PC fatigue were observed in four subjects. All subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in fc of SCM and SC. Results indicate that early signs of the fatiguing process might be detected in the D, PS, SCM, and SC muscles during exercise to exhaustion. Fatigue of either D or PS muscles develops selectively or together during exhaustive exercise, depending on the recruitment pattern of respiratory muscles. Accessory inspiratory muscles of the neck are less resistant to fatigue compared with the D and PS muscles.

PMID: 23835979 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Reiki and related therapies in the dialysis ward: an evidence-based and ethical discussion to debate if these complementary and alternative medicines are welcomed or banned.

Wed, 2014-01-08 06:15
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Reiki and related therapies in the dialysis ward: an evidence-based and ethical discussion to debate if these complementary and alternative medicines are welcomed or banned.

BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:129

Authors: Ferraresi M, Clari R, Moro I, Banino E, Boero E, Crosio A, Dayne R, Rosset L, Scarpa A, Serra E, Surace A, Testore A, Colombi N, Piccoli BG

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAMs) are increasingly practiced in the general population; it is estimated that over 30% of patients with chronic diseases use CAMs on a regular basis. CAMs are also used in hospital settings, suggesting a growing interest in individualized therapies. One potential field of interest is pain, frequently reported by dialysis patients, and seldom sufficiently relieved by mainstream therapies. Gentle-touch therapies and Reiki (an energy based touch therapy) are widely used in the western population as pain relievers.By integrating evidence based approaches and providing ethical discussion, this debate discusses the pros and cons of CAMs in the dialysis ward, and whether such approaches should be welcomed or banned.
DISCUSSION: In spite of the wide use of CAMs in the general population, few studies deal with the pros and cons of an integration of mainstream medicine and CAMs in dialysis patients; one paper only regarded the use of Reiki and related practices. Widening the search to chronic pain, Reiki and related practices, 419 articles were found on Medline and 6 were selected (1 Cochrane review and 5 RCTs updating the Cochrane review). According to the EBM approach, Reiki allows a statistically significant but very low-grade pain reduction without specific side effects. Gentle-touch therapy and Reiki are thus good examples of approaches in which controversial efficacy has to be balanced against no known side effect, frequent free availability (volunteer non-profit associations) and easy integration with any other pharmacological or non pharmacological therapy. While a classical evidence-based approach, showing low-grade efficacy, is likely to lead to a negative attitude towards the use of Reiki in the dialysis ward, the ethical discussion, analyzing beneficium (efficacy) together with non maleficium (side effects), justice (cost, availability and integration with mainstream therapies) and autonomy (patients' choice) is likely to lead to a permissive-positive attitude.
SUMMARY: This paper debates the current evidence on Reiki and related techniques as pain-relievers in an ethical framework, and suggests that physicians may wish to consider efficacy but also side effects, contextualization (availability and costs) and patient's requests, according also to the suggestions of the Society for Integrative Oncology (tolerate, control efficacy and side effects).

PMID: 23799960 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Learned regulation of brain metabolism.

Wed, 2014-01-08 06:15
Related Articles

Learned regulation of brain metabolism.

Trends Cogn Sci. 2013 Jun;17(6):295-302

Authors: Birbaumer N, Ruiz S, Sitaram R

Abstract
Self-regulation and voluntary control of circumscribed brain regions using real-time functional MRI (rt-fMRI) allows the establishment of a causal functional link between localized brain activity and behavior and cognition. A long tradition of research has clearly shown the brain's ability to learn volitional control of its own activity and effects on behavior. Yet, the underlying neural mechanism of self-regulation is still not fully understood. Here, we propose that self-regulation of brain activity is akin to skill learning and thus may depend on an intact subcortical motor system. We elaborate on the critical role of the basal ganglia in skill learning and neurofeedback, and clarify that brain-self-regulation need not be an explicit and conscious process as often mistakenly held.

PMID: 23664452 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Performance of motor imagery brain-computer interface based on anodal transcranial direct current stimulation modulation.

Wed, 2014-01-08 06:15
Related Articles

Performance of motor imagery brain-computer interface based on anodal transcranial direct current stimulation modulation.

IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng. 2013 May;21(3):404-15

Authors: Wei P, He W, Zhou Y, Wang L

Abstract
Voluntarily modulating neural activity plays a key role in brain-computer interface (BCI). In general, the self-regulated neural activation patterns are used in the current BCI systems involving the repetitive trainings with feedback for an attempt to achieve a high-quality control performance. With the limitation posed by the training procedure in most BCI studies, the present work aims to investigate whether directly modulating the neural activity by using an external method could facilitate the BCI control. We designed an experimental paradigm that combines anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with a motor imagery (MI)-based feedback EEG BCI system. Thirty-two young and healthy human subjects were randomly assigned to the real and sham stimulation groups to evaluate the effect of tDCS-induced EEG pattern changes on BCI classification accuracy. Results showed that the anodal tDCS obviously induces sensorimotor rhythm (SMR)-related event-related desynchronization (ERD) pattern changes in the upper-mu (10-14 Hz) and beta (14-26 Hz) rhythm components. Both the online and offline BCI classification results demonstrate that the enhancing ERD patterns could conditionally improve BCI performance. This pilot study suggests that the tDCS is a promising method to help the users to develop reliable BCI control strategy in a relatively short time.

PMID: 23475381 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Behavioral demonstration of a somatosensory neuroprosthesis.

Wed, 2014-01-08 06:15
Related Articles

Behavioral demonstration of a somatosensory neuroprosthesis.

IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng. 2013 May;21(3):500-7

Authors: Berg JA, Dammann JF, Tenore FV, Tabot GA, Boback JL, Manfredi LR, Peterson ML, Katyal KD, Johannes MS, Makhlin A, Wilcox R, Franklin RK, Vogelstein RJ, Hatsopoulos NG, Bensmaia SJ

Abstract
Tactile sensation is critical for effective object manipulation, but current prosthetic upper limbs make no provision for delivering somesthetic feedback to the user. For individuals who require use of prosthetic limbs, this lack of feedback transforms a mundane task into one that requires extreme concentration and effort. Although vibrotactile motors and sensory substitution devices can be used to convey gross sensations, a direct neural interface is required to provide detailed and intuitive sensory feedback. In light of this, we describe the implementation of a somatosensory prosthesis with which we elicit, through intracortical microstimulation (ICMS), percepts whose magnitude is graded according to the force exerted on the prosthetic finger. Specifically, the prosthesis consists of a sensorized finger, the force output of which is converted into a regime of ICMS delivered to primary somatosensory cortex through chronically implanted multi-electrode arrays. We show that the performance of animals (Rhesus macaques) on a tactile task is equivalent whether stimuli are delivered to the native finger or to the prosthetic finger.

PMID: 23475375 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Breathing exercise using a new breathing device increases airway secretion clearance in mechanically ventilated patients.

Wed, 2014-01-08 06:15
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Breathing exercise using a new breathing device increases airway secretion clearance in mechanically ventilated patients.

Heart Lung. 2013 May-Jun;42(3):177-82

Authors: Jones CU, Kluayhomthong S, Chaisuksant S, Khrisanapant W

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new device (BreatheMAX) that humidifies and oscillates inspired air to increase secretion clearance in mechanically ventilated patients.
BACKGROUND: Poor secretion clearance is a serious problem for intubated patients leading to lung complications and delayed weaning.
METHODS: Double blinded crossover; fifteen patients, median age 60 years, range 16-75. Interventions consisted of spontaneous deep breathing with (treatment) and without (sham) humidification and oscillation of inspired air. Airway secretions were aspirated for 3 h before and after each intervention and wet weight and viscosity determined.
RESULTS: The sham intervention caused no change in secretion clearance (95% CI: -1.8, 1.8 g) but after treatment secretions increased by 4.0 g (95% CI: 1.3, 6.7; p < 0.05). Viscosity decreased 30% after treatment and was unchanged after sham. Changes in cardiopulmonary function were not clinically significant and the patients reported only mild perceptions of breathlessness.
CONCLUSIONS: Breathing exercise with a device that includes vibration and humidification of inspired air is effective for increasing secretion clearance with patients dependent on mechanical ventilation and was without any adverse effects.

PMID: 23474003 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Arm stiffness during assisted movement after stroke: the influence of visual feedback and training.

Wed, 2014-01-08 06:15
Related Articles

Arm stiffness during assisted movement after stroke: the influence of visual feedback and training.

IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng. 2013 May;21(3):454-65

Authors: Piovesan D, Morasso P, Giannoni P, Casadio M

Abstract
Spasticity and muscular hypertonus are frequently found in stroke survivors and may have a significant effect on functional impairment. These abnormal neuro-muscular properties, which are quantifiable by the net impedance of the hand, have a direct consequence on arm mechanics and are likely to produce anomalous motor paths. Literature studies quantifying limb impedance in stroke survivors have focused on multijoint static tasks and single joint movements. Despite this research, little is known about the role of sensory motor integration in post-stroke impedance modulation. The present study elucidates this role by integrating an evaluation of arm impedance into a robotically mediated therapy protocol. Our analysis had three specific objectives: 1) obtaining a reliable measure for the mechanical proprieties of the upper limb during robotic therapy; 2) investigating the effects of robot-assisted training and visual feedback on arm stiffness and viscosity; 3) determining if the stiffness measure and its relationship with either training or visual feedback depend on arm position, speed, and level of assistance. This work demonstrates that the performance improvements produced by minimally assistive robot training are associated with decreased viscosity and stiffness in stroke survivors' paretic arm and that these mechanical impedance components are partially modulated by visual feedback.

PMID: 23193322 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Control of stair ascent and descent with a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

Wed, 2014-01-08 06:15
Related Articles

Control of stair ascent and descent with a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng. 2013 May;21(3):466-73

Authors: Lawson BE, Varol HA, Huff A, Erdemir E, Goldfarb M

Abstract
This paper presents a finite state-based control system for a powered transfemoral prosthesis that provides stair ascent and descent capability. The control system was implemented on a powered prosthesis and evaluated by a unilateral, transfemoral amputee subject. The ability of the powered prosthesis to provide stair ascent and descent capability was assessed by comparing the gait kinematics, as recorded by a motion capture system, with the kinematics provided by a passive prosthesis, in addition to those recorded from a set of healthy subjects. The results indicate that the powered prosthesis provides gait kinematics that are considerably more representative of healthy gait, relative to the passive prosthesis, for both stair ascent and descent.

PMID: 23096120 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

EMG-based visual-haptic biofeedback: a tool to improve motor control in children with primary dystonia.

Wed, 2014-01-08 06:15
Related Articles

EMG-based visual-haptic biofeedback: a tool to improve motor control in children with primary dystonia.

IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng. 2013 May;21(3):474-80

Authors: Casellato C, Pedrocchi A, Zorzi G, Vernisse L, Ferrigno G, Nardocci N

Abstract
New insights suggest that dystonic motor impairments could also involve a deficit of sensory processing. In this framework, biofeedback, making covert physiological processes more overt, could be useful. The present work proposes an innovative integrated setup which provides the user with an electromyogram (EMG)-based visual-haptic biofeedback during upper limb movements (spiral tracking tasks), to test if augmented sensory feedbacks can induce motor control improvement in patients with primary dystonia. The ad hoc developed real-time control algorithm synchronizes the haptic loop with the EMG reading; the brachioradialis EMG values were used to modify visual and haptic features of the interface: the higher was the EMG level, the higher was the virtual table friction and the background color proportionally moved from green to red. From recordings on dystonic and healthy subjects, statistical results showed that biofeedback has a significant impact, correlated with the local impairment, on the dystonic muscular control. These tests pointed out the effectiveness of biofeedback paradigms in gaining a better specific-muscle voluntary motor control. The flexible tool developed here shows promising prospects of clinical applications and sensorimotor rehabilitation.

PMID: 23060345 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

"You're being paged!" outcomes of a nursing home on-call role-playing and longitudinal curriculum.

Tue, 2014-01-07 06:10
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"You're being paged!" outcomes of a nursing home on-call role-playing and longitudinal curriculum.

J Am Geriatr Soc. 2013 Nov;61(11):1976-82

Authors: Yuasa M, Bell CL, Inaba M, Tamura BK, Ahsan S, Saunders V, Masaki K

Abstract
Effectively handling telephone calls about nursing home (NH) residents is an important skill for healthcare professionals, but little formal training is typically provided. The objective of the current study was to describe and evaluate the effectiveness of a novel structured role-playing didactic session followed by an on-call NH longitudinal clinical experience. The effectiveness of the structured role-playing didactic session was compared in different learners, including geriatric medicine fellows (n = 10), family medicine residents and faculty (n = 14), nurse practitioner students (n = 31), and other learners (n = 7). The curriculum focused on common problems encountered while caring for NH residents during on-call periods. Learners rated themselves using an 18-item pre/post questionnaire including five attitude and 13 skills questions, using a 1-to-5 Likert scale. T-tests were used to compare means before and after sessions. Significant improvements were found in overall mean attitudes and skills scores. For all learners, the greatest improvements were seen in "comfort in managing residents at the NH," "managing feeding or gastrostomy tube dislodgement," "identifying different availability of medications, laboratory studies, and procedures in NH," and "describing steps to send NH residents to the emergency department." Geriatric medicine fellows' attitudes and skills improved significantly after the longitudinal clinical experience. The faculty survey demonstrated improved documentation, communication, and fellows' management of on-call problems after curriculum implementation. This novel curriculum used role-playing to provide training for on-call management of NH residents. This curriculum has been successfully disseminated on a national geriatrics educational resource website (POGOe) and is applicable to geriatric medicine fellowships, internal medicine and family medicine residency programs, and other training programs.

PMID: 24219199 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Re: Feedback or biofeedback to augment pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women: shortened version of a Cochrane systematic review.

Tue, 2014-01-07 06:10
Related Articles

Re: Feedback or biofeedback to augment pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women: shortened version of a Cochrane systematic review.

J Urol. 2013 Dec;190(6):2169

Authors: Wein AJ

PMID: 24209545 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Investigating short- and long-term transfer effects of a Taiji beginner course in participants' daily life.

Tue, 2014-01-07 06:10
Related Articles

Investigating short- and long-term transfer effects of a Taiji beginner course in participants' daily life.

J Integr Med. 2013 Sep;11(5):295-304

Authors: Schitter AM, Ausfeld-Hafter B, Nedeljkovic M

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: In recent years research investigating various health benefits of Taiji practice has markedly increased. Despite this growing scientific interest, essential questions such as to what extent a Taiji course may exert noticeable effects in participants' everyday life, what these effects are, and how and where potential transfer effects occur, have hardly been considered. The aim of our study was to explore transfer effects from a Taiji course into participants' daily lives.
METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal observational study in 45 healthy participants at the end of their three-month Taiji beginner course (tp1) and at two months (tp2) as well as one year after course completion (tp3). Participants were asked to report their Taiji practice behavior at all time points, as well as to rate and describe perceived transfer effects of Taiji course contents on their daily life at tp1 and tp3.
RESULTS: Transfer effects were reported by 91.1% of all respondents after course completion (tp1) and persisted in 73.3% at the one-year follow-up assessment (tp3), counting "increase of self-efficacy", "improvement of stress management", and "increase of body awareness" as the most frequently mentioned effects. Transfer effects predominantly occurred in participants' work and social environments, as well as during everyday activities in public areas. While self-reliant Taiji practice frequency significantly decreased from 82.2% at tp1 to 55.6% at tp3 (P < 0.001), the magnitude of self-reported transfer effects did not (P = 0.35). As explorative analyses revealed, regular Taiji course attendance was highly correlated with stronger transfer effects at tp1 (r = 0.51; P < 0.001) and tp3 (r = 0.35; P = 0.020). Participants reporting high self-reliant Taiji practice frequency at tp2 were likely to maintain a regular practice routine at tp3 (r = 0.42; P < 0.004), whereas self-reliant practice frequency and transfer effects at tp1 were positively correlated with self-reliant practice frequency at tp3 on a trend level (r < 0.27; P > 0.08).
CONCLUSION: Our data underline the importance of regular course participation for pronounced and long lasting transfer effects into participants' everyday life. We discuss that several context and process-related aspects of a Taiji intervention are potentially relevant factors for enhancement of transfer effect.

PMID: 24063776 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The vaded ego state and the invisible bridging induction.

Tue, 2014-01-07 06:10
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The vaded ego state and the invisible bridging induction.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2013;61(2):232-50

Authors: Emmerson G

Abstract
Abstract Ego state therapy is based on the assumption that personality is composed of parts. When people switch from 1 state to another, they take their ego identification with them, while their levels of affect, intellect, confidence, and skill change. A vaded ego state has become overwhelmed by fear or rejection such that when it becomes executive, it interferes with normal function and emotional stability. The angst these states carry are the root cause of psychological addictions, OCD, panic disorder, PTSD, a sense of unworthiness of love, extreme competitiveness, and much more. The invisible bridge is an induction technique that uses the somatic experience of the vaded state to provide a focus for hypnotic induction and a bridge to the original sensitizing event that vaded the previously normal state. This article contextualizes the vaded state within abnormal psychology and describes the invisible bridge induction.

PMID: 23427846 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Portuguese norms for the harvard group scale of hypnotic susceptibility, form a.

Tue, 2014-01-07 06:10
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Portuguese norms for the harvard group scale of hypnotic susceptibility, form a.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2013;61(2):219-31

Authors: Carvalho C

Abstract
The Portuguese version of the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A) was administered to 313 Portuguese college students. Score distribution, item pass rates, item analysis, and reliability of the HGSHS:A are presented and compared to earlier published reference samples. No differences were found between males and females. Reliability of the HGSHS:A Portuguese version was lower than that reported by most of the studies but within the range of the non-English versions. In general, Portuguese data are congruent with the reference samples and the Portuguese translation of the HGSHS:A. It appears to be a viable instrument for primary screening of hypnotic suggestibility in a Portuguese context.

PMID: 23427845 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Nocturnal bruxism and hypnotherapy: a case study.

Tue, 2014-01-07 06:10
Related Articles

Nocturnal bruxism and hypnotherapy: a case study.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2013;61(2):205-18

Authors: Dowd ET

Abstract
This article describes a case study of a hypnotherapeutic treatment of nocturnal bruxism. The author saw the client for a total of 7 sessions. Hypnotherapy was interspersed with an exploration of tacit and initially denied hostility in the client's life as well as aspects of a somewhat difficult childhood. At the end, the bruxism had disappeared. Follow-up 1 year later indicated that the bruxism had not returned, and the client had become more assertive in her relations with others and had more exploratory activities in her life directions. The latter had not been dealt with in therapy. Thus, there appeared to be a "ripple effect" of successful therapy from one part of her life into its other aspects.

PMID: 23427844 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The effects of hypnosis on an elite senior European tour golfer: a single-subject design.

Tue, 2014-01-07 06:10
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The effects of hypnosis on an elite senior European tour golfer: a single-subject design.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2013;61(2):193-204

Authors: Pates J

Abstract
This study examined the effects of a hypnosis intervention on the performance and flow-state experiences of an elite senior European Tour golf professional. The experimental effect was assessed during 11 Senior European Tour golf events. Performance and flow data were analyzed using a single-subject design combined with a procedure to monitor the player's internal experience. The results indicated that the player's mean stroke average and mean flow scores increased from baseline to intervention. There were no overlapping data points between baseline and intervention conditions for both performance and flow-state scores. The qualitative data revealed hypnosis may positively control emotions, thoughts, feelings, and perceptions.

PMID: 23427843 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Hypnotizability is associated with a protective but not acquisitive self-presentation style.

Tue, 2014-01-07 06:10
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Hypnotizability is associated with a protective but not acquisitive self-presentation style.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2013;61(2):183-92

Authors: Levin R, Bachner-Melman R, Edelman S, Ebstein RP, Heresco-Levy U, Lichtenberg P

Abstract
Self-presentation refers to the behavioral strategies a person adopts to convey desired social images of oneself to other people. The Concern for Appropriateness Scale (CAS) measures a defensive and fearful social approach aimed at avoiding social threats whereas the Revised Self-Monitoring Scale (RSMS) measures an active and flexible social approach aimed at gaining power and status. In this study, a significant correlation was found between hypnotizability, as measured by the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C) scores and CAS (r = .43, p = .002) but not between hypnotizability and RSMS (r = .070, p = .631). These results suggest that a protective self-presentation style may incline certain individuals to cooperate with hypnotic suggestions.

PMID: 23427842 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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