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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]
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A randomised controlled trial of the use of aromatherapy and hand massage to reduce disruptive behaviour in people with dementia.

Tue, 2013-09-24 07:26
Related Articles

A randomised controlled trial of the use of aromatherapy and hand massage to reduce disruptive behaviour in people with dementia.

BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013;13:165

Authors: Fu CY, Moyle W, Cooke M

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Aromatherapy and hand massage therapies have been reported to have some benefit for people with dementia who display behavioural symptoms; however there are a number of limitations of reported studies. The aim is to investigate the effect of aromatherapy (3% lavender oil spray) with and without hand massage on disruptive behaviour in people with dementia living in long-term care.
METHODS: In a single blinded randomised controlled trial 67 people with a diagnosis of dementia and a history of disruptive behaviour, from three long-term care facilities were recruited and randomised using a random number table into three groups: (1) Combination (aromatherapy and hand massage) (n = 22), (2) Aromatherapy (n = 23), (3) Placebo control (water spray) (n = 22). The intervention was given twice daily for six weeks. Data on residents' behaviour (CMAI) and cognition (MMSE) were collected before, during and after the intervention.
RESULTS: Despite a downward trend in behaviours displayed not one of the interventions significantly reduced disruptive behaviour.
CONCLUSIONS: Further large-scale placebo controlled studies are required where antipsychotic medication is controlled and a comparison of the methods of application of aromatherapy are investigated.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: ACTRN12612000917831.

PMID: 23837414 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effects of a brief Qigong-based stress reduction program (BQSRP) in a distressed Korean population: a randomized trial.

Tue, 2013-09-24 07:26
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Effects of a brief Qigong-based stress reduction program (BQSRP) in a distressed Korean population: a randomized trial.

BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013;13:113

Authors: Hwang EY, Chung SY, Cho JH, Song MY, Kim S, Kim JW

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Distressed individuals in Korea may benefit from the practice of mind-body exercises such as Qigong. However, the effectiveness of such techniques needs to be investigated.
METHODS: Fifty participants who were eligible to this study were randomized into a group receiving a 4-week intervention of a brief Qigong-based stress reduction program (BQSRP) or a wait-list control group. Before and after the intervention period, saliva samples were collected and questionnaires were completed on perceived stress, anxiety, "Hwa-Byung" (anger syndrome), and quality of life. Salivary cortisol has emerged in mind-body therapy research as an easy-to-collect, relatively inexpensive, biologic marker of stress. Salivary corisol were collected to evaluate physiological effect of BQSRP. Between-group comparisons of change from baseline to study completion were analyzed by analysis of covariance for the Perceived Stress Scale and independent two sample t-tests for other measures.
RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the BQSRP intervention group displayed significantly larger decreases in Perceived Stress Scale scores (p = 0.0006), State Anxiety scores (p = 0.0028), Trait Anxiety scores (p < 0.0001), personality subscale scores of the Hwa-Byung Scale (p = 0.0321), symptoms scores of the Hwa-Byung Scale (p = 0.0196), and a significantly larger increase in World Health Organization Quality of Life Abbreviated version scores (ps < .05). Salivary cortisol levels were not changed.
CONCLUSIONS: The BQSRP appears to be effective in reducing stress perception, anxiety, anger, and improving quality of life (KCT0000056).

PMID: 23705963 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Complexity-based measures inform Tai Chi's impact on standing postural control in older adults with peripheral neuropathy.

Tue, 2013-09-24 07:26
Related Articles

Complexity-based measures inform Tai Chi's impact on standing postural control in older adults with peripheral neuropathy.

BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013;13:87

Authors: Manor B, Lipsitz LA, Wayne PM, Peng CK, Li L

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Tai Chi training enhances physical function and may reduce falls in older adults with and without balance disorders, yet its effect on postural control as quantified by the magnitude or speed of center-of-pressure (COP) excursions beneath the feet is less clear. We hypothesized that COP metrics derived from complex systems theory may better capture the multi-component stimulus that Tai Chi has on the postural control system, as compared with traditional COP measures.
METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of a pilot, non-controlled intervention study that examined the effects of Tai Chi on standing COP dynamics, plantar sensation, and physical function in 25 older adults with peripheral neuropathy. Tai Chi training was based on the Yang style and consisted of three, one-hour group sessions per week for 24 weeks. Standing postural control was assessed with a force platform at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. The degree of COP complexity, as defined by the presence of fluctuations existing over multiple timescales, was calculated using multiscale entropy analysis. Traditional measures of COP speed and area were also calculated. Foot sole sensation, six-minute walk (6MW) and timed up-and-go (TUG) were also measured at each assessment.
RESULTS: Traditional measures of postural control did not change from baseline. The COP complexity index (mean ± SD) increased from baseline (4.1 ± 0.5) to week 6 (4.5 ± 0.4), and from week 6 to week 24 (4.7 ± 0.4) (p=0.02). Increases in COP complexity-from baseline to week 24-correlated with improvements in foot sole sensation (p=0.01), the 6MW (p=0.001) and TUG (p=0.01).
CONCLUSIONS: Subjects of the Tai Chi program exhibited increased complexity of standing COP dynamics. These increases were associated with improved plantar sensation and physical function. Although more research is needed, results of this non-controlled pilot study suggest that complexity-based COP measures may inform the study of complex mind-body interventions, like Tai Chi, on postural control in those with peripheral neuropathy or other age-related balance disorders.

PMID: 23587193 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effect of an office worksite-based yoga program on heart rate variability: outcomes of a randomized controlled trial.

Tue, 2013-09-24 07:26
Related Articles

Effect of an office worksite-based yoga program on heart rate variability: outcomes of a randomized controlled trial.

BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013;13:82

Authors: Cheema BS, Houridis A, Busch L, Raschke-Cheema V, Melville GW, Marshall PW, Chang D, Machliss B, Lonsdale C, Bowman J, Colagiuri B

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Chronic work-related stress is an independent risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases and associated mortality, particularly when compounded by a sedentary work environment. The purpose of this study was to determine if an office worksite-based hatha yoga program could improve physiological stress, evaluated via heart rate variability (HRV), and associated health-related outcomes in a cohort of office workers.
METHODS: Thirty-seven adults employed in university-based office positions were randomized upon the completion of baseline testing to an experimental or control group. The experimental group completed a 10-week yoga program prescribed three sessions per week during lunch hour (50 min per session). An experienced instructor led the sessions, which emphasized asanas (postures) and vinyasa (exercises). The primary outcome was the high frequency (HF) power component of HRV. Secondary outcomes included additional HRV parameters, musculoskeletal fitness (i.e. push-up, side-bridge, and sit & reach tests) and psychological indices (i.e. state and trait anxiety, quality of life and job satisfaction).
RESULTS: All measures of HRV failed to change in the experimental group versus the control group, except that the experimental group significantly increased LF:HF (p = 0.04) and reduced pNN50 (p = 0.04) versus control, contrary to our hypotheses. Flexibility, evaluated via sit & reach test increased in the experimental group versus the control group (p < 0.001). No other adaptations were noted. Post hoc analysis comparing participants who completed ≥70% of yoga sessions (n = 11) to control (n = 19) yielded the same findings, except that the high adherers also reduced state anxiety (p = 0.02) and RMSSD (p = 0.05), and tended to improve the push-up test (p = 0.07) versus control.
CONCLUSIONS: A 10-week hatha yoga intervention delivered at the office worksite during lunch hour did not improve HF power or other HRV parameters. However, improvements in flexibility, state anxiety and musculoskeletal fitness were noted with high adherence. Future investigations should incorporate strategies to promote adherence, involve more frequent and longer durations of yoga training, and enrol cohorts who suffer from higher levels of work-related stress.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: ACTRN12611000536965.

PMID: 23574691 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The effectiveness of physiotherapy in patients with asthma: a systematic review of the literature.

Tue, 2013-09-24 07:26
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The effectiveness of physiotherapy in patients with asthma: a systematic review of the literature.

Respir Med. 2013 Apr;107(4):483-94

Authors: Bruurs ML, van der Giessen LJ, Moed H

Abstract
Since the introduction of medical therapy for asthma the interest in non-medical treatments deteriorated. Physiotherapy could have beneficial effects in asthmatics. This review investigates the effectiveness of physiotherapy in the treatment of patients with asthma. A review was performed on the terms breathing exercises (BE), inspiratory muscle training (IMT), physical training (PhT) and airway clearance (AC) in patients with asthma. The search resulted in 237 potentially relevant articles, after exclusion 23 articles remained. BE (n = 9) may improve disease specific quality of life (QoL), reduce symptoms, hyperventilation, anxiety and depression, lower respiratory rate and medication use. IMT (n = 3) can improve inspiratory pressure and may reduce medication use and symptoms. PhT (n = 12) can reduce symptoms, improve QoL and improve cardiopulmonary endurance and fitness. In conclusion, physiotherapy may improve QoL, cardiopulmonary fitness and inspiratory pressure and reduce symptoms and medication use. Further studies, investigating combinations of techniques, are needed to confirm these findings.

PMID: 23333065 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Connecting body and mind: the first interview with somatising patients and their families.

Tue, 2013-09-24 07:26
Related Articles

Connecting body and mind: the first interview with somatising patients and their families.

Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2013 Apr;18(2):224-45

Authors: Kozlowska K, English M, Savage B

Abstract
In this article we outline the framework our consultation-liaison team has developed for interviewing families whose children present with medically unexplained symptoms. The framework was developed over many years in the context of our work with a large number of families, who collectively taught us to be more sensitive with regard to the experience of such families in the medical system, and who reacted strongly when we moved prematurely to the use of psychological language or to questions about family relationships or emotional functioning. Throughout the interview we maintain a focus on the body: the family history of illness and, in particular, the story of the child's symptoms. We take a detailed, temporally ordered history of the symptom and ask for collateral information - family illness, family life events, events at school, family emotional responses - all in relation to the story of the symptoms. In the assessment interview and in our work in general, we focus on the body. We move very carefully and very slowly from the physical to the psychological, from talking about the body to talking about relationships and about the mind.

PMID: 22969165 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Boosting human learning by hypnosis.

Tue, 2013-09-24 07:26
Related Articles

Boosting human learning by hypnosis.

Cereb Cortex. 2013 Apr;23(4):801-5

Authors: Nemeth D, Janacsek K, Polner B, Kovacs ZA

Abstract
Human learning and memory depend on multiple cognitive systems related to dissociable brain structures. These systems interact not only in cooperative but also sometimes competitive ways in optimizing performance. Previous studies showed that manipulations reducing the engagement of frontal lobe-mediated explicit attentional processes could lead to improved performance in striatum-related procedural learning. In our study, hypnosis was used as a tool to reduce the competition between these 2 systems. We compared learning in hypnosis and in the alert state and found that hypnosis boosted striatum-dependent sequence learning. Since frontal lobe-dependent processes are primarily affected by hypnosis, this finding could be attributed to the disruption of the explicit attentional processes. Our result sheds light not only on the competitive nature of brain systems in cognitive processes but also could have important implications for training and rehabilitation programs, especially for developing new methods to improve human learning and memory performance.

PMID: 22459017 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Disaster medicine: how do doctors cope?].

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
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[Disaster medicine: how do doctors cope?].

Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2013 Jul;138(28-29):1446-7

Authors: Weiß J

PMID: 23986913 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Use of complementary therapies in hospice and palliative care.

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
Related Articles

Use of complementary therapies in hospice and palliative care.

Omega (Westport). 2013;67(1-2):227-32

Authors: Vandergrift A

Abstract
As society has become increasingly inquisitive about complementary therapies, various sectors of the medical community have begun to incorporate complementary therapies into their practice, studying their impact on client health and effectiveness in treating specific symptoms. This article describes the design and initial findings from a 1-year review of the implementation of massage and Reiki therapies on patients in a small hospice and palliative care program in central Connecticut. Over the course of 1 year, 114 massage sessions were provided to 52 different patients, all of which included Reiki. After completion of these sessions, patients were evaluated for changes in symptoms such as pain reduction, ease in breathing, stress/anxiety reduction, and increased relaxation, with the results being predominantly beneficial.

PMID: 23977801 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Curves ahead: yoga is for every body.

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
Related Articles

Curves ahead: yoga is for every body.

Diabetes Forecast. 2013 Aug;66(8):36-7

Authors: Wahowiak L

PMID: 23967524 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

A physician 'quality of presence'- a vital therapeutic tool.

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
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A physician 'quality of presence'- a vital therapeutic tool.

S Afr Med J. 2013 Jul;103(7):439-40

Authors: Bateman C

PMID: 23946954 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Anorexia and corporal mediations].

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
Related Articles

[Anorexia and corporal mediations].

Soins Pediatr Pueric. 2013 Jul-Aug;(273):29-31

Authors: Bureau H, Moro MR

Abstract
The body, the central point of expression of the anorexic symptom, is an important therapeutic lever.The young anorexic girl protects herself through corporal hypertonicity. This tension is consistent with her fears of seeing her body becoming that of an adult and to feel emotions and sensations with too much force. Corporal mediation consists in helping the young girls get to grips with this body.

PMID: 23923454 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Immediate cardiovascular effects of pranava pranayama in hypertensive patients.

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
Related Articles

Immediate cardiovascular effects of pranava pranayama in hypertensive patients.

Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2012 Jul-Sep;56(3):273-8

Authors: Bhavanani AB, Madanmohan, Sanjay Z, Basavaraddi IV

Abstract
Slow, deep, pranayama-based breathing training has been shown to be effective in reducing blood pressure (BP). The present study was undertaken to determine immediate effects of performing pranava pranayama on cardiovascular parameters in hypertensive patients. 29 hypertensive patients who were on medical treatment and also attending yoga sessions were recruited for the present study. Supine heart rate (HR) and BP were recorded before and after performance of pranava pranayama for five minutes. Post intervention statistical analysis revealed a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in systolic pressure (SP) and a more significant (P < 0.01) reduction in HR, pulse pressure and double product (Do P). The reduction in rate-pressure product (RPP) was highly significant (P < 0.001). Pranava pranayama is effective in reducing HR and SP in hypertensive patients within five minutes of the practice. This may be due to a normalization of autonomic cardiovascular rhythms as a result of increased vagal modulation and/or decreased sympathetic activity and improved baroreflex sensitivity along with an augmentation of endogenous nitric oxide production. Our findings have potential therapeutic applications in day-to-day as well as clinical situations where blood pressure needs to be brought down at the earliest. The significant fall in RPP and Do P signifies a reduction in oxygen consumption and work done by the heart. It is concluded that pranava pranayama, a simple and cost effective technique can be used in the management of hypertensive patients in addition to the regular medical management. Further studies are required to enable a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved and its usefulness in the long- term management of hypertension.

PMID: 23734443 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effect of yoga on different aspects of mental health.

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
Related Articles

Effect of yoga on different aspects of mental health.

Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2012 Jul-Sep;56(3):245-54

Authors: Telles S, Singh N, Yadav A, Balkrishna A

Abstract
State anxiety, somatization of stress, quality of life, self-rated quality of sleep, and discomfort due to over-breathing which occurs when stressed were studied. Out of a total of 140 participants, seventy participants self-selected to be in a yoga group for stress relief (group mean age +/- SD, 33.0 +/- 6.5 years; 37 males). Seventy age and gender matched participants were in a control group. State anxiety, somatization of stress, quality of life, discomfort and self-rated quality of sleep were assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Symptom Checklist-90-R, SF-12, Nijmegen Discomfort Evaluation Scale and a Sleep Rating Questionnaire respectively. Assessments were made at the beginning and end of the week. Repeated measures ANOVAs with Bonferroni adjusted post-hoc analyses showed a significant decrease in state anxiety (P < 0.001), somatization of stress (P < 0.01), improved health-related quality of life (P < 0.01), self-rated quality of sleep (P < 0.01), and decrease in discomfort due to over-breathing (P < 0.001). No changes (except decreased discomfort due to over-breathing; P < 0.01) occurred in the control group. This study suggests that a brief yoga program may be beneficial in decreasing anxiety, somatization of stress and discomfort, improving health-related quality of life and self-rated sleep quality.

PMID: 23734439 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Use of role play in undergraduate teaching of ethics - an experience.

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
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Use of role play in undergraduate teaching of ethics - an experience.

J Forensic Leg Med. 2013 Apr;20(3):136-8

Authors: Noone PH, Raj Sharma S, Khan F, Raviraj KG, Shobhana SS

Abstract
Lecture is the traditional way of teaching adopted in our routine. Learning about medical ethics used to be done by lecture. All of us felt that learning some aspects of ethics requires a deeper understanding of the topics especially those areas involving feelings and emotions. So the role play method was chosen. We taught the topics consent and euthanasia by both the didactic method and by role play to the students of second year MBBS during the period June-July 2012 and then we compared the results. We have tried to evaluate role play vis-a vis lecture by analyzing the feedback from the students. The affective component analysis requires a different method of teaching and assessment as shown by our experience.

PMID: 23472789 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The treatment of iatrogenic male incontinence: latest results and future perspectives.

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
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The treatment of iatrogenic male incontinence: latest results and future perspectives.

Rev Recent Clin Trials. 2013 Mar;8(1):36-41

Authors: Adamakis I, Vasileiou I, Constantinides CA

Abstract
Male Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is an increasingly recognized problem particularly after the treatment of prostate cancer. Postprostatectomy incontinence is a major problem that needs to be solved, since it has great impact on quality of life affecting the patient's physical activity and social well-being. The initial treatment for SUI that persists after 12 months consists of conservative measures such as pelvic floor muscle exercises and behavioral therapy. Properly selected and informed patients can also be treated efficiently with minimally invasive procedures such as the implantation of a male suburethral sling, although the experience with such devices is not extensive. However, the implantation of artificial urinary sphincter is the gold standard therapy.

PMID: 23259418 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Adopting role plays/skits to enhance the learning of clinical respiratory physiology.

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
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Adopting role plays/skits to enhance the learning of clinical respiratory physiology.

Adv Physiol Educ. 2012 Dec;36(4):358-9

Authors: Thaman RG, Arora AK

PMID: 23209020 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Examining a therapeutic yoga program for prostate cancer survivors.

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
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Examining a therapeutic yoga program for prostate cancer survivors.

Integr Cancer Ther. 2013 Mar;12(2):113-25

Authors: Ross Zahavich AN, Robinson JA, Paskevich D, Culos-Reed SN

Abstract
BACKGROUND: In the earlier stages of prostate cancer, effective treatments have created a need for research to focus on practices that may improve quality of life throughout survivorship. Physical activity is a significant supportive care management strategy for prostate cancer survivors, though the optimal modality is not yet understood.
HYPOTHESES: The authors hypothesized that yoga would be a feasible physical activity option for prostate cancer survivors and their support persons and that the incorporation of social support would increase physical activity adherence.
METHODS: This 14-week feasibility study involved a 7-week class-based yoga program (adherence phase), followed by 7 weeks of self-selected physical activity (maintenance phase). Demographic information, physical activity behavior, quality of life, fatigue, stress, mood, and fitness variables were assessed at 3 time points. Prostate cancer survivors' perceived social support was rated during yoga and after yoga.
RESULTS: Class attendance was 6.1 and 5.8 for prostate cancer survivors (n = 15) and their support persons (n = 10), respectively, for the 7 classes. Levels of perceived social support were higher for those who brought a support person. Significant improvements with regard to stress, fatigue, and mood before and after yoga class (all Ps < .05) were reported by all participants. No clinically significant changes were noted on prostate cancer survivor's quality of life or fatigue over the course of the 14-week study.
CONCLUSIONS: Yoga is a feasible physical activity option for prostate cancer survivors. The program had a promising uptake rate, high program adherence rate, and there were acute program benefits with regard to stress, fatigue, and mood for all participants. Future examination is warranted with regard to chronic benefits and group cohesion influences on levels of perceived social support.

PMID: 22740082 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Investigating the perceived feasibility of integrative medicine in a conventional oncology setting: yoga therapy as a treatment for breast cancer survivors.

Sat, 2013-09-21 06:29
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Investigating the perceived feasibility of integrative medicine in a conventional oncology setting: yoga therapy as a treatment for breast cancer survivors.

Integr Cancer Ther. 2013 Mar;12(2):103-12

Authors: Slocum-Gori S, Howard AF, Balneaves LG, Kazanjian A

Abstract
BACKGROUND: A majority of cancer survivors experience debilitating effect(s) related to their cancer diagnosis and treatments across physical, psychological, social, and spiritual domains. Timely and innovative solutions are needed to address the adverse treatment-related effects and often disjointed services that breast cancer patients face. Recent studies suggest that the majority of breast cancer survivors are using complementary and alternative medicine at some point along their cancer trajectory. In recent years, scientists and clinicians have examined the effects of yoga therapy among cancer patients and survivors. The current study examined the perceived feasibility of implementing yoga therapy as a treatment service for breast cancer patients at a large urban cancer center in Canada.
METHODS: A mixed-methods approach that included focus groups and self-reported surveys with health care providers (HCPs) and breast cancer patients was used in this research.
RESULTS: Overall, results indicated that breast cancer patients and HCPs were supportive and eager for the implementation of a yoga therapy program. Six themes emerged from the analysis of the focus group and the survey data: (1) the availability of resources and accessibility of yoga therapy, (2) the credibility and transparency of yoga therapy, (3) the understanding of yoga therapy, (4) an educational component, (5) the therapeutic context, and (6) the integration of yoga therapy. Specific facilitators and barriers became evident within these themes.
CONCLUSIONS: Although enthusiasm for the implementation of an integrative yoga therapy program was apparent among both breast cancer survivors and HCPs, barriers were also identified. The findings of this study are currently being used to inform a large-scale program of research aimed at developing integrative treatment services for breast cancer patients, beginning with yoga therapy.

PMID: 22710259 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

A piece of my mind. Syntax of survival.

Wed, 2013-09-18 06:04
Related Articles

A piece of my mind. Syntax of survival.

JAMA. 2013 Sep 11;310(10):1027-8

Authors: Dunlop J

PMID: 24026595 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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