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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]
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Telephone-based mindfulness training to reduce stress in women with myocardial infarction: Rationale and design of a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

Mon, 2019-05-06 11:22
Related Articles

Telephone-based mindfulness training to reduce stress in women with myocardial infarction: Rationale and design of a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

Am Heart J. 2018 08;202:61-67

Authors: Spruill TM, Reynolds HR, Dickson VV, Shallcross AJ, Visvanathan PD, Park C, Kalinowski J, Zhong H, Berger JS, Hochman JS, Fishman GI, Ogedegbe G

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Elevated stress is associated with adverse cardiovascular disease outcomes and accounts in part for the poorer recovery experienced by women compared with men after myocardial infarction (MI). Psychosocial interventions improve outcomes overall but are less effective for women than for men with MI, suggesting the need for different approaches. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is an evidence-based intervention that targets key psychosocial vulnerabilities in women including rumination (i.e., repetitive negative thinking) and low social support. This article describes the rationale and design of a multicenter randomized controlled trial to test the effects of telephone-delivered MBCT (MBCT-T) in women with MI.
METHODS: We plan to randomize 144 women reporting elevated perceived stress at least two months after MI to MBCT-T or enhanced usual care (EUC), which each involve eight weekly telephone sessions. Perceived stress and a set of patient-centered health outcomes and potential mediators will be assessed before and after the 8-week telephone programs and at 6-month follow-up. We will test the hypothesis that MBCT-T will be associated with greater 6-month improvements in perceived stress (primary outcome), disease-specific health status, quality of life, depression and anxiety symptoms, and actigraphy-based sleep quality (secondary outcomes) compared with EUC. Changes in mindfulness, rumination and perceived social support will be evaluated as potential mediators in exploratory analyses.
CONCLUSIONS: If found to be effective, this innovative, scalable intervention may be a promising secondary prevention strategy for women with MI experiencing elevated perceived stress.

PMID: 29864732 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Slow loaded breathing training improves blood pressure, lung capacity and arm exercise endurance for older people with treated and stable isolated systolic hypertension.

Mon, 2019-05-06 11:22
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Slow loaded breathing training improves blood pressure, lung capacity and arm exercise endurance for older people with treated and stable isolated systolic hypertension.

Exp Gerontol. 2018 07 15;108:48-53

Authors: Ublosakka-Jones C, Tongdee P, Pachirat O, Jones DA

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hypertension and reduced lung function are important features of aging. Slow loaded breathing training reduces resting blood pressure and the question is whether this can also improve lung function.
METHODS: Thirty-two people (67 ± 5 years, 16 male) with controlled isolated systolic hypertension undertook an eight weeks randomised controlled training trial with an inspiratory load of 25% maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) at 6 breaths per minute (slow loaded breathing; SLB) or deep breathing control (CON). Outcome measures were resting blood pressure (BP) and heart rate; MIP; lung capacity; chest and abdominal expansion; arm cranking exercise endurance at 50% heart rate reserve.
RESULTS: Home based measurement of resting systolic BP decreased by 20 mm Hg (15 to 25) (Mean and 95%CI) for SLB and by 5 mm Hg (1 to 7) for CON. Heart rate and diastolic BP also decreased significantly for SLB but not CON. MIP increased by 15.8 cm H2O (11.8 to 19.8) and slow vital capacity by 0.21 L (0.15 to 0.27) for SLB but not for CON. Chest and abdominal expansion increased by 2.3 cm (2.05 to 2.55) and 2.5 cm (2.15 to 2.85), respectively for SLB and by 0.5 cm (0.26 to 0.74) and 1.7 cm (1.32 to 2.08) for CON. Arm exercise time increased by 4.9 min (3.65 to 5.15) for SLB with no significant change for CON.
CONCLUSION: Slow inspiratory muscle training is not only effective in reducing resting BP, even in older people with well controlled isolated systolic hypertension but also increases inspiratory muscle strength, lung capacity and arm exercise duration.

PMID: 29604403 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Mindfulness training reduces loneliness and increases social contact in a randomized controlled trial.

Fri, 2019-05-03 17:16
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Mindfulness training reduces loneliness and increases social contact in a randomized controlled trial.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2019 02 26;116(9):3488-3493

Authors: Lindsay EK, Young S, Brown KW, Smyth JM, Creswell JD

Abstract
Loneliness and social isolation are a growing public health concern, yet there are few evidence-based interventions for mitigating these social risk factors. Accumulating evidence suggests that mindfulness interventions can improve social-relationship processes. However, the active ingredients of mindfulness training underlying these improvements are unclear. Developing mindfulness-specific skills-namely, (i) monitoring present-moment experiences with (ii) an orientation of acceptance-may change the way people perceive and relate toward others. We predicted that developing openness and acceptance toward present experiences is critical for reducing loneliness and increasing social contact and that removing acceptance-skills training from a mindfulness intervention would eliminate these benefits. In this dismantling trial, 153 community adults were randomly assigned to a 14-lesson smartphone-based intervention: (i) training in both monitoring and acceptance (Monitor+Accept), (ii) training in monitoring only (Monitor Only), or (iii) active control training. For 3 d before and after the intervention, ambulatory assessments were used to measure loneliness and social contact in daily life. Consistent with predictions, Monitor+Accept training reduced daily-life loneliness by 22% (d = 0.44, P = 0.0001) and increased social contact by two more interactions each day (d = 0.47, P = 0.001) and one more person each day (d = 0.39, P = 0.004), compared with both Monitor Only and control trainings. These findings describe a behavioral therapeutic target for improving social-relationship functioning; by fostering equanimity with feelings of loneliness and social disconnect, acceptance-skills training may allow loneliness to dissipate and encourage greater engagement with others in daily life.

PMID: 30808743 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Use of a 'pose rate' to quantify yoga.

Fri, 2019-05-03 17:16
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Use of a 'pose rate' to quantify yoga.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Feb;42:48-52

Authors: Forseth B, Hauff C

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To develop a method that describes the physical activity completed during yoga, and to use this method to compare three different yoga video categories: weight loss, beginner, and stress relief/meditation.
DESIGN: This study conducted content analysis of commercially available yoga videos in which pre-determined characteristics of yoga routines were recorded. Outcome measures included the yoga routine characteristics of: duration of each yoga routine, number of completed poses, body position of each pose, and pose rate.
RESULTS: Twenty-two routines from yoga videos were analyzed. Duration of routine between the three different categories was not significantly different. There were significant differences between the video categories based on the characteristics of total number of poses and the pose rate, with weight loss routines having the highest values compare to beginner routines and stress relief/meditation (total number of poses: 74.1, 34.3, 25.6 poses, p < 0.05; Pose rate: 2.5m 1.5, 1.1 poses/min, p < 0.05, respectively). Additionally, differences were observed between body postures in poses with weight loss videos including more standing poses (38.8, 17.0, 5.7 poses, p < 0.05, respectively) and a lower percentage of seated (9.9%, 15.8%, 39.0%, p < 0.05, respectively) and supine poses (10.9%, 18.5%, 28.8%, p < 0.05, respectively) compared to the beginner and stress/meditation videos.
CONCLUSIONS: The characteristics of total poses, pose rate, and total standing poses showed significant differences between different styles of yoga. Further research should be conducted to validate these characteristics as an intensity measures and to assess if these characteristics have variations between different yoga styles.

PMID: 30670281 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Associations of yoga practice, health status, and health behavior among yoga practitioners in Germany-Results of a national cross-sectional survey.

Fri, 2019-05-03 17:16
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Associations of yoga practice, health status, and health behavior among yoga practitioners in Germany-Results of a national cross-sectional survey.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Feb;42:19-26

Authors: Cramer H, Quinker D, Pilkington K, Mason H, Adams J, Dobos G

Abstract
BACKGROUND: While yoga can improve health-related variables and health behavior, different yoga styles and practice components appear to be associated with specific health outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the connection between yoga use, health, and health behaviors across different yoga styles.
METHODS: A cross-sectional anonymous online survey (n = 1,702; 88.9% female; 93.3% German nationality; mean age 47.2 ± 10.8 years; 58.2% yoga teachers) assessed yoga practice characteristics, health-related variables and health behavior. The survey was distributed in Germany only but not limited to German participants.
RESULTS: Ashtanga yoga (15.7%), Hatha yoga (14.2%), and Sivananda yoga (22.4%) were the most commonly practiced yoga styles; participants practiced for a mean of 12.7 ± 10.0 years. Most participants had good to excellent (96.1%) overall health; 87.7% reported improved health since starting yoga. Controlling for sociodemographic and clinical factors, health-related variables were mainly associated with frequency of yoga postures practice (p < 0.05), health behaviors also with yoga philosophy study (p < 0.05). The various yoga styles were associated with specific health-related variables (p < 0.05).
CONCLUSION: Yoga practitioners generally have a good overall health and a healthy lifestyle. While health variables are mainly associated with practice of yoga postures, health behaviors are also associated with the study of yoga philosophy. Yoga interventions targeting prevention or health promotion should include yoga philosophy to modify health behaviors. The specific yoga style employed may also influence health outcomes.

PMID: 30670242 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Development of a yoga module targeting cardiovascular health for patients with post-myocardial left ventricular dysfunction in India.

Fri, 2019-05-03 17:16
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Development of a yoga module targeting cardiovascular health for patients with post-myocardial left ventricular dysfunction in India.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Feb;42:170-177

Authors: Sharma S, Pailoor S, Choudhary Ram N, Shrestha S

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Yoga is known to contribute towards cardiovascular health. This paper describes the development of a need-based yoga program which is suitable to be integrated into the cardiac rehabilitation of post-myocardial infarction patients with left ventricular dysfunction.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Based on the assessment of the need of the patients, literature review, and expert opinion, a yoga module was developed using the qualitative method of inquiry. The program included warm-up exercises, yogic asanas, pranayama, meditation and counseling sessions. A structured questionnaire eliciting comments on the contents was given independently to ten experts working in the field of health and yoga for validation. The final module was derived after incorporating the suggestions of the experts.
RESULTS: Using the raters' expertise in cardiology and yoga practice, the practices which constitute the module were optimized. Majority of the experts (raters) agreed with the duration of 1 h training for 1month under supervision as adequate for subsequent practice at home. There was a 0.786 inter-rater reliability estimated using the interclass coefficient (ICC) and 0.789 internal consistency of the questions, measured using Cronbach's alpha. Both values indicate "good" reliability and consistency of the yoga module.
CONCLUSION: The developed yoga module was found to be acceptable. Future randomized control trials will be necessary to validate the effectiveness of this module and if the module demonstrates to be effective by clinical studies, it may add a therapeutic option in the rehabilitation of patients with heart failure following myocardial infarction, which can be applied in the hospitals and community level.

PMID: 30670239 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effectiveness of yoga in eating disorders - A case report.

Fri, 2019-05-03 17:16
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Effectiveness of yoga in eating disorders - A case report.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Feb;42:145-148

Authors: Ostermann T, Vogel H, Starke C, Cramer H

Abstract
Eating disorders are among the most common psychosomatic diseases and are often associated with negative health consequences. The use of yoga as a treatment method in eating disorders is controversial discussed. The interviewee was a 38 year old female patient suffering on anorexia nervosa and various psychosomatic-psychiatric diagnoses in her medical history. The patient reported that yoga recovered the soul contact which she lost and she had learned to perceive and feel herself again. She stated that yoga helped her to find access to her body and its needs and to cope with her traumatic experiences. She also reported that attitudes have changed in relation to her stomach in the treatment of her anorexia. The case report confirmed the positive effect of yoga on eating disorders. Research should pay particular attention to taking into account the influence of individual's co-morbidities, as eating disorders usually occur in association with co-morbidities.

PMID: 30670233 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Tai Chi practice on prefrontal oxygenation levels in older adults: A pilot study.

Fri, 2019-05-03 17:16
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Tai Chi practice on prefrontal oxygenation levels in older adults: A pilot study.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Feb;42:132-136

Authors: Tsang WWN, Chan KK, Cheng CN, Hu FSF, Mak CTK, Wong JWC

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The role of exercise in preventing or delaying age-related cognitive decline is an important focus of rehabilitation. Tai Chi (TC) is a traditional Chinese exercise that has been found to improve cognitive function. However, the mechanism underlying this improvement is still unknown. We compared the effects of TC practice (mind-body exercise) and arm ergometry (AE; body focused exercise) on prefrontal cortex activity between TC practitioners and non-practitioners.
DESIGN: This cross-sectional study included 16 older female subjects (8 TC practitioners and 8 non-practitioners). The practitioners had each practiced TC for at least 7 years. Prefrontal cortex activity was measured using the prefrontal oxygenation level obtained with near-infrared spectroscopy. During the spectroscopy measurement, the participants performed TC, after watching a video of 12-form seated Yang Style TC, and AE in a subsequent session.
RESULTS: We found significantly greater changes in the levels of oxyhemoglobin (HbO2; p = 0.022) and total hemoglobin (cHb; p = 0.002) in the TC condition compared with the AE condition in all participants. In the TC practitioner group, a similar trend was shown in the change of HbO2 (p = 0.117) and cHb (p = 0.051) when practicing TC versus AE. However, in the non-practitioner group, we found a statistically greater change in cHb (p = 0.005) but not in HbO2 (p = 0.056).
CONCLUSION: The older adults had higher brain activity when practicing TC compared with AE, and a significant effect was observed in the non-practitioner group. These pilot results may provide insight into the underlying mechanism of the effectiveness of TC practice in preventing cognitive decline in older adults.

PMID: 30670231 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Feasibility of yoga as a complementary therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes: The Healthy Active and in Control (HA1C) study.

Fri, 2019-05-03 17:16
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Feasibility of yoga as a complementary therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes: The Healthy Active and in Control (HA1C) study.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Feb;42:125-131

Authors: Bock BC, Thind H, Fava JL, Dunsiger S, Guthrie KM, Stroud L, Gopalakrishnan G, Sillice M, Wu W

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study:Healthy Active and in Control (HA1C), examined the feasibility and acceptability of yoga as a complementary therapy for adults with Type-2 Diabetes (T2DM).
DESIGN: A 2-arm randomized clinical trial comparing Iyengar yoga with a supervised walking program.
SETTING: Hospital based gym-type facility and conference rooms.
INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomized to a 12-week program of either; (1) a twice weekly Iyengar yoga, or (2) a twice-weekly program of standard exercise (SE).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcomes assessed feasibility and acceptability, including enrollment rates, attendance, study completion, and participant satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included HbA1c, physical activity, and measures of diabetes-related emotional distress, self-care and quality of life (QOL). Assessments were conducted at baseline, end of treatment, 6-months and 9-months post-enrollment.
RESULTS: Of 175 adults screened for eligibility, 48 (30 women, 18 men) were eligible and enrolled. The most common reasons for ineligibility were orthopedic restrictions, HbA1c levels <6.5 and BMI > 42. Session attendance was high (82% of sessions attended), as was follow-up completion rates (92%). Program satisfaction rated on a 5-point scale, was high among both Yoga (M = 4.63, SD = 0.57) and SE (M = 4.77, SD = 0.52) participants. Overall 44 adverse events (26 Yoga, 18 SE) were reported. Of these, six were deemed "possibly related" (e.g., neck strain, back pain), and 1 "probably related" (ankle pain after treadmill) to the study. Yoga produced significant reductions in HbA1c. Median HbA1c at 6 months was 1.25 units lower for Yoga compared to SE (95% CI: -2.54 -0.04). Greater improvements in diabetes self-care, quality of life, and emotional distress were seen among Yoga participants than among SE participants. Increases in mindfulness were seen in Yoga but not in SE.
CONCLUSIONS: The yoga intervention was highly feasible and acceptable, and produced improvements in blood glucose and psychosocial measures of diabetes management.

PMID: 30670230 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Home practice and quality of life among patients with neurofibromatosis randomized to a mind-body intervention.

Fri, 2019-05-03 17:16
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Home practice and quality of life among patients with neurofibromatosis randomized to a mind-body intervention.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Feb;42:114-118

Authors: Funes CJ, Zale EL, Luberto CM, Vranceanu AM

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to summarize home practice in patients with neurofibromatosis (NF) randomized to an 8-week group mind-body intervention, the Relaxation Response Resiliency Program for NF (3RP-NF). We further examined the association between home practice and changes in four domains of quality of life (QoL).
METHODS: Data are derived from a single-blind RCT of the 3RP-NF (N = 31) delivered via videoconferencing versus an attention placebo control. 3RP-NF participants submitted weekly home practice logs to the group leader prior to each weekly session, which included information regarding their engagement of relaxation response (RR)-eliciting skills and appreciation skills. Physical, psychological, social and environmental QoL were measured at baseline, post-intervention and at a 6-months follow up.
RESULTS: Participants reported engaging in home practice of RR-eliciting skills on average 28.55 days (SD = 10.79) and appreciation skills on average 24.39 days (SD = 13.48) over the 49-day treatment period. Participants reported an average of 383.42 (SD = 274.38) minutes of RR-eliciting skills home practice and an average of 49.13 (SD = 41.90) appreciations skills home practice. A significant association was observed between frequency of RR-eliciting skills home practice and physical QoL at the 6-month follow-up (r = .383, p = .034).
CONCLUSIONS: Participants with NF are able and willing to practice RR-eliciting skills and appreciation skills outside of treatment sessions. Frequency of RR-eliciting skills home practice may be associated with improvement in physical QoL. Future research should replicate these efforts with larger samples, and attempt to identify additional factors that predict optimal response to mind-body interventions other than home practice.

PMID: 30670227 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Mindset and its relationship to anxiety in clinical veterinary students.

Fri, 2019-05-03 17:16
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Mindset and its relationship to anxiety in clinical veterinary students.

Vet Rec. 2018 Nov 24;183(20):623

Authors: Bostock R, Kinnison T, May SA

Abstract
This study investigated anxiety, one aspect of mental wellbeing, in fourth year veterinary students before the final clinical section of their course (intramural rotations (IMR)). It explored the relationship between reported anxiety and 'mindset': an individual's view on the ability to develop (eg, improve intelligence). Questionnaires were completed by 130 students. Students were mindset typed for ability and personality and rated their anxiety towards IMR. Students with different overall mindsets ('strong growth', 'growth' and 'fixed') were invited to participate in focus groups, to discuss causes of their anxieties. Quantitative results indicated 63.1 per cent of students had strong growth or growth mindsets overall, and that females were more fixed mindset-oriented than males. Females reported significantly greater anxiety than males. A fixed mindset view overall, and of ability, were significantly correlated with increased anxiety, while mindset view of personality was not. Students provided various reasons for their anxieties, which differed with mindset. Fixed mindset students (n=2) focused on concerns about knowledge, whereas growth students (n=6) were also anxious about work-life balance and future work. Growth students saw clinicians as future colleagues, rather than intimidating teachers. Students reported an awareness of being graded, although growth students were aware that IMR are learning opportunities.

PMID: 30327350 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Cognitive and Mind-Body Therapies for Chronic Low Back Pain and Neck Pain: Effectiveness and Value.

Fri, 2019-05-03 17:16
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Cognitive and Mind-Body Therapies for Chronic Low Back Pain and Neck Pain: Effectiveness and Value.

JAMA Intern Med. 2018 04 01;178(4):556-557

Authors: Cherkin DC, Herman PM

PMID: 29507946 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effects of respiratory muscle training (RMT) in patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Fri, 2019-05-03 17:16
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Effects of respiratory muscle training (RMT) in patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Sleep Breath. 2018 05;22(2):323-328

Authors: Herkenrath SD, Treml M, Priegnitz C, Galetke W, Randerath WJ

Abstract
PURPOSE: Different forms of training focusing on the muscles of the upper airways showed limited effects on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and/or snoring. We investigated the effect of generalized respiratory muscle training (RMT) in lean patients with mild to moderate OSA.
METHODS: Nine male subjects (52.0 ± 10.8 years, BMI 29.1 ± 2.1 kg/m2) with obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 9-29) participated in an open, single-arm pilot study. After a 1-week build-up phase, patients underwent 4 weeks of normocapnic hyperpnea RMT five times a week for 30 min each. The initial and final measurements comprised polysomnography, pulmonary function tests, Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), and SF-36 questionnaire (quality of life (QoL) self-assessment). The investigational site was a university-affiliated hospital for pulmonary diseases and sleep medicine, Solingen/Germany.
RESULTS: Patients trained effectively, seen by a significant (p < 0.01) increase of breathing frequency (23.3 ± 1.5 /min vs. 30.6 ± 2.9 /min) and minute volume (81.2 ± 13.7 L vs. 109.1 ± 21.9 L). AHI, snoring and ESS remained unchanged after training. QoL as measured by SF-36 significantly (p < 0.05) improved after the training in the subscales "bodily pain" (79 ± 21 vs. 90 ± 12) and "change of health" (3.1 ± 0.3 vs. 2.4 ± 0.5).
CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence that AHI, pulmonary function or daytime sleepiness are affected by 5 weeks of RMT. Nevertheless, there is an improvement of parameters of quality of life.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov , register no. NCT 00936286.

PMID: 29080065 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The health effects of Baduanjin exercise (a type of Qigong exercise) in breast cancer survivors: A randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial.

Thu, 2019-05-02 08:13
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The health effects of Baduanjin exercise (a type of Qigong exercise) in breast cancer survivors: A randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial.

Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2019 Apr;39:90-97

Authors: Ying W, Min QW, Lei T, Na ZX, Li L, Jing L

Abstract
PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Baduanjin exercise, which is a traditional Chinese Qigong exercise, in breast cancer survivors to assess its efficacy for physical and psychological rehabilitation.
METHODS: The study was a single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Eighty-six subjects were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 46) or control (n = 40) groups. The intervention group received Baduanjin exercise 3 days/week at hospital and another 4 days/week at home for 6 months, whereas the control group were requested to maintain their original physical activity. Outcomes included body mass index (BMI), heart rate variability, lung capacity, arm circumference, shoulder range of motion, step test index, anxiety, depression, and quality of life (QOL).
RESULTS: After 6 months of intervention, heart rate variability and shoulder range of motion were significantly improved in the Baduanjin group compared to the control group (P < 0.05). There were also significant improvements in depression, QOL, and four QOL dimension scores (physical well-being, social well-being, functional well-being, and breast cancer subscale) (P < 0.05). However, there were no differences in the BMI, lung capacity, arm circumference, step test index, anxiety, and the emotional well-being QOL dimension scores.
CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that Baduanjin is an effective intervention for improving physical and psychological health outcomes among breast cancer survivors, which is worth recommending and implementing by oncology nurses for breast cancer survivors during their long rehabilitation journeys.

PMID: 30850143 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effect of a posture correction-based intervention on musculoskeletal symptoms and fatigue among control room operators.

Thu, 2019-05-02 08:13
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Effect of a posture correction-based intervention on musculoskeletal symptoms and fatigue among control room operators.

Appl Ergon. 2019 Apr;76:12-19

Authors: Bazazan A, Dianat I, Feizollahi N, Mombeini Z, Shirazi AM, Castellucci HI

Abstract
This study was conducted to examine the effect of a posture correction-based intervention (with a biofeedback device) on the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) and fatigue among control room operators in a petrochemical plant in Iran. A total of 188 office workers (91 in the case group and 97 in the control group) participated at baseline as well as at 6- and 12-month follow-up. A questionnaire survey (including the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory) and direct observations of working postures by using the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) method were used. The occurrence of MSS in the shoulders, upper back, neck, and low back areas, as well as the mental and physical dimensions of fatigue were found to be the most common problems. The results showed considerable improvements in working postures (in the neck, trunk, and RULA grand scores) and the occurrence of MSS (particularly in the neck, shoulders, and upper back and low back areas) and fatigue (in particular the mental and physical aspects) after the intervention. The overall mean RULA grand score for the case group was significantly decreased after the intervention (mean scores of 5.1, 4.4, and 4.6 at pre-intervention, post-intervention 1, and post-intervention 2, respectively). A total of 81 operators (89.0%) reported some kind of MSS at baseline, which were reduced to 75 operators (82.4%) and 77 operators (84.6%) at post-interventions 1 and 2, respectively. Significant differences were also found between the pre- and post-intervention scores for the physical fatigue (mean of 12.19, 10.16, and 9.99 at pre-intervention, post-intervention 1, and post-intervention 2, respectively) and mental fatigue (mean of 14.03, 12.05, and 12.16 at pre-intervention, post-intervention 1, and post-intervention 2, respectively) dimensions. The findings confirm the effectiveness of this low-cost, simple, and easy-to-use ergonomic intervention.

PMID: 30642516 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The moral power of suggestion: A history of suggestion in Japan, 1900-1930.

Thu, 2019-05-02 08:13
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The moral power of suggestion: A history of suggestion in Japan, 1900-1930.

J Hist Behav Sci. 2019 Jan;55(1):21-39

Authors: Wu YC

Abstract
In Japan, as in the west, suggestion theory was the predominant theory of hypnosis, and suggestive therapy was one of the most important, if not the most important, form of psychotherapy in the early 20th century. While the use of suggestion was met with objections on both scientific and moral grounds in the west, it was seen in a more positive light and has had a significant influence on the development of psychotherapy in Japan. With regard to the contexts of suggestion, suggestive power, suggestibility, and the effects of suggestion, this study will examine the distinctive conceptions and practices of suggestion developed by analogy with existing ideas about interpersonal influence, particularly with the concept of kanka (assimilative transformation) in Japan. They provide an interesting comparison to the western ideas of suggestion, helping us understand the historical and cultural particularity of western dynamic psychiatry and psychotherapy, particularly their presumptions about interpersonal influence.

PMID: 30508292 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Enhancing Placebo Effects in Somatic Symptoms Through Oxytocin.

Thu, 2019-05-02 08:13
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Enhancing Placebo Effects in Somatic Symptoms Through Oxytocin.

Psychosom Med. 2018 05;80(4):353-360

Authors: Skvortsova A, Veldhuijzen DS, Van Middendorp H, Van den Bergh O, Evers AWM

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Placebo effects relieve various somatic symptoms, but it is unclear how they can be enhanced to maximize positive treatment outcomes. Oxytocin administration may potentially enhance placebo effects, but few studies have been performed, and they have had conflicting findings. The study aim was to investigate the influence of positive verbal suggestions and oxytocin on treatment expectations and placebo effects for pain and itch.
METHODS: One hundred eight female participants were allocated to one of the following four groups: (1) oxytocin with positive verbal suggestions, (2) placebo with positive verbal suggestions, (3) oxytocin without suggestions, and (4) placebo without suggestions. The administration of 24 IU oxytocin or a placebo spray was preceded by positive verbal suggestions regarding the pain- and itch-relieving properties of the spray or no suggestions, depending on group allocation. Pain was assessed with a cold pressor test, and itch was assessed with histamine iontophoresis.
RESULTS: Positive verbal suggestions induced expectations of lower pain (F = 4.77, p = .031) and itch (F = 5.38, p = .022). Moreover, positive verbal suggestions elicited placebo analgesia (F = 5.48, p = .021) but did not decrease itch. No effect of oxytocin on the placebo effect or on expectations was found.
CONCLUSIONS: Positive suggestions induced placebo analgesia but oxytocin did not enhance the placebo effect. Study limitations are that we only included a female sample and a failure to induce placebo effect for itch. Future studies should focus on how oxytocin might influence placebo effects, taken into account the role of sex, dose-dependent effects, and various expectation manipulations.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was registered as a clinical trial on www.trialregister.nl (number 6376).

PMID: 29613940 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

EEG Analysis of the Neurofeedback Training Effect in Algorithmic Thinking.

Thu, 2019-05-02 08:13
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EEG Analysis of the Neurofeedback Training Effect in Algorithmic Thinking.

Adv Exp Med Biol. 2017;988:313-324

Authors: Plerou A, Vlamos P, Margetaki A

Abstract
Although significant advances have been made in understanding several cognitive states, the algorithmic thinking ability is yet to be analyzed in terms of neuroscience and brain imaging techniques. Studies on the effects of neurofeedback on learning disabilities especially mathematics disorders are limited. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the brain activity and activation differences between neurofeedback trained participants and controls, during the overall EEG analysis during continuous algorithmic tasks performance. A study of 182 children of upper education is proposed to assess the efficacy of two protocols of neurofeedback training as means of algorithmic thinking ability evaluation. Results suggest statistical significant variation in the mean SD values in terms of several brain waves ratios during algorithmic task solving epochs.

PMID: 28971410 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The Effectiveness of Neurofeedback Training in Algorithmic Thinking Skills Enhancement.

Thu, 2019-05-02 08:13

The Effectiveness of Neurofeedback Training in Algorithmic Thinking Skills Enhancement.

Adv Exp Med Biol. 2017;988:181-191

Authors: Plerou A, Vlamos P, Triantafillidis C

Abstract
Although research on learning difficulties are overall in an advanced stage, studies related to algorithmic thinking difficulties are limited, since interest in this field has been recently raised. In this paper, an interactive evaluation screener enhanced with neurofeedback elements, referring to algorithmic tasks solving evaluation, is proposed. The effect of HCI, color, narration and neurofeedback elements effect was evaluated in the case of algorithmic tasks assessment. Results suggest the enhanced performance in the case of neurofeedback trained group in terms of total correct and optimal algorithmic tasks solution. Furthermore, findings suggest that skills, concerning the way that an algorithm is conceived, designed, applied and evaluated are essentially improved.

PMID: 28971398 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

KETAMINE AS A POSSIBLE MODERATOR OF HYPNOTIZABILITY: A FEASIBILITY STUDY.

Wed, 2019-05-01 08:11
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KETAMINE AS A POSSIBLE MODERATOR OF HYPNOTIZABILITY: A FEASIBILITY STUDY.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2018 Jul-Sep;66(3):298-307

Authors: Patterson DR, Hoffer C, Jensen MP, Wiechman SA, Sharar SR

Abstract
This pilot study explored the feasibility of using ketamine to increase hypnotizability scores. Ketamine, classified as a dissociative hallucinogen, is used clinically as an anesthetic in high doses and as a treatment for chronic pain and depression in lower doses. Low-dose ketamine can contribute to dissociation and heightened perceptions and feelings of detachment, arguably hypnotic-like states. The authors predicted that a low dose of ketamine in healthy volunteers who scored in the low hypnotizable range on the Stanford Clinical Hypnotizability Scale would (a) cause an increase in subjective ratings of dissociation and (b) lead to an increase in hypnotizability. The findings were in the predicted direction, warranting further investigation into the use of this agent to increase hypnotizability.

PMID: 29856288 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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