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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]
Updated: 14 min 44 sec ago

Mindfulness Meditation Is Related to Long-Lasting Changes in Hippocampal Functional Topology during Resting State: A Magnetoencephalography Study.

Sat, 2019-03-16 06:49
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Mindfulness Meditation Is Related to Long-Lasting Changes in Hippocampal Functional Topology during Resting State: A Magnetoencephalography Study.

Neural Plast. 2018;2018:5340717

Authors: Lardone A, Liparoti M, Sorrentino P, Rucco R, Jacini F, Polverino A, Minino R, Pesoli M, Baselice F, Sorriso A, Ferraioli G, Sorrentino G, Mandolesi L

Abstract
It has been suggested that the practice of meditation is associated to neuroplasticity phenomena, reducing age-related brain degeneration and improving cognitive functions. Neuroimaging studies have shown that the brain connectivity changes in meditators. In the present work, we aim to describe the possible long-term effects of meditation on the brain networks. To this aim, we used magnetoencephalography to study functional resting-state brain networks in Vipassana meditators. We observed topological modifications in the brain network in meditators compared to controls. More specifically, in the theta band, the meditators showed statistically significant (p corrected = 0.009) higher degree (a centrality index that represents the number of connections incident upon a given node) in the right hippocampus as compared to controls. Taking into account the role of the hippocampus in memory processes, and in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, meditation might have a potential role in a panel of preventive strategies.

PMID: 30662457 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Home-based biofeedback for dyssynergic defecation.

Sat, 2019-03-16 06:49
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Home-based biofeedback for dyssynergic defecation.

Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 11;3(11):733-734

Authors: Heinrich H, Fox M

PMID: 30236903 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Discrepancy detection in the retrieval-enhanced suggestibility paradigm.

Sat, 2019-03-16 06:49
Related Articles

Discrepancy detection in the retrieval-enhanced suggestibility paradigm.

Memory. 2018 04;26(4):483-492

Authors: Butler BJ, Loftus EF

Abstract
Retrieval-enhanced suggestibility (RES) refers to the finding that immediately recalling the details of a witnessed event can increase susceptibility to later misinformation. In three experiments, we sought to gain a deeper understanding of the role that retrieval plays in the RES paradigm. Consistent with past research, initial testing did increase susceptibility to misinformation - but only for those who failed to detect discrepancies between the original event and the post-event misinformation. In all three experiments, subjects who retrospectively detected discrepancies in the post-event narratives were more resistant to misinformation than those who did not. In Experiments 2 and 3, having subjects concurrently assess the consistency of the misinformation narratives negated the RES effect. Interestingly, in Experiments 2 and 3, subjects who had retrieval practice and detected discrepancies were more likely to endorse misinformation than control subjects who detected discrepancies. These results call attention to limiting conditions of the RES effect and highlight the complex relationship between retrieval practice, discrepancy detection, and misinformation endorsement.

PMID: 28899262 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]; +31 new citations

Fri, 2019-03-15 09:45

31 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]

These pubmed results were generated on 2019/03/15

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]; +31 new citations

Fri, 2019-03-15 06:44

31 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]

These pubmed results were generated on 2019/03/15

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Modelling Impulse Response Function of Functional Infrared Imaging for General Linear Model Analysis of Autonomic Activity.

Thu, 2019-03-14 06:44
Related Articles

Modelling Impulse Response Function of Functional Infrared Imaging for General Linear Model Analysis of Autonomic Activity.

Sensors (Basel). 2019 Feb 19;19(4):

Authors: Perpetuini D, Cardone D, Filippini C, Chiarelli AM, Merla A

Abstract
Functional infrared imaging (fIRI) is a validated procedure to infer autonomic arousal. Currently, fIRI signals are analysed through descriptive metrics, such as average temperature changes in a region of interest (ROI). However, the employment of mathematical models could provide a powerful tool for the accurate identification of autonomic activity and investigation of the mechanisms underlying autonomic arousal. A linear temporal statistical model such as the general linear model (GLM) is particularly suited for its simplicity and direct interpretation. In order to apply the GLM, the thermal response linearity and time-invariance of fIRI have to be demonstrated, and the thermal impulse response (TIR) needs to be characterized. In this study, the linearity and time-invariance of the thermal response to sympathetic activating stimulation were demonstrated, and the TIR for employment of the GLM was characterized. The performance of the GLM-fIRI was evaluated by comparison with the GLM applied on synchronous measurements of the skin conductance response (SCR). In fact, the GLM-SCR is a validated procedure to estimate autonomic arousal. Assuming the GLM-SCR as the gold standard approach, a GLM-fIRI sensitivity and specificity of 86.4% and 75.9% were obtained. The GLM-fIRI may allow increased performances in the evaluation of autonomic activity and a broader range of application of fIRI in both research and clinical settings for the assessment of psychophysiological and psychopathological states.

PMID: 30791366 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Psychodermatology: An Indian perspective.

Thu, 2019-03-14 06:44
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Psychodermatology: An Indian perspective.

Clin Dermatol. 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):737-742

Authors: Shenoi SD, Prabhu SS

Abstract
Psychodermatology, a relatively neglected branch of dermatology in India, refers to a holistic approach to skin diseases involving not only the mind and skin, but also the cutaneous effects of psychologic stress. Among many Indian people, culture, religion, the belief in karma, and the tendency to prefer indigenous medical systems can all have a major impact on lifestyle, as well as the approach to managing various diseases, including dermatologic conditions. The origin of psychodermatology in India can be traced to Buddha's period. Indigenous medical systems, such as Ayurveda, Yoga, and Unani, advocate control of skin disease through meditation, exercises, and related practices. Scientific practice of psychodermatology is still lacking in India, although there is an increasing understanding of the mind-skin connection among both health care providers and patients who have access to information over the Internet. The first dedicated psychodermatology liaison clinic was established in 2010 in Manipal, India. The common problems encountered have been anxiety, dysthymia, and depression, especially in patients with psoriasis, vitiligo, and urticaria.

PMID: 30446197 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Psoriasis: Psychosomatic, somatopsychic, or both?

Thu, 2019-03-14 06:44
Related Articles

Psoriasis: Psychosomatic, somatopsychic, or both?

Clin Dermatol. 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):698-703

Authors: Kwon CW, Fried RG, Nousari Y, Ritchlin C, Tausk F

Abstract
Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by substantial psychiatric comorbidity. Historically, anecdotal observations have suggested that psychosocial distress can trigger flares of psoriasis, but over the past several decades, high-quality data from experimental studies support the assertion that stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. There may be a subset of patients unable to elicit an appropriate immunosuppressive response to stress through upregulation of cortisol, with resultant exacerbation of their psoriasis. Other notable studies revealed that key neuromodulators, including substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and nerve growth factor may be potent regulators of neurogenic inflammation that induce psoriasis flares through a stress-mediated mechanism. Preliminary trials in humans that examine psychosocial interventions to reduce stress, as well as animal studies targeting specific neuropeptides, provide support for the concept that alteration of pathways mediated by the stress response represents novel forms of therapy in the management of psoriasis.

PMID: 30446190 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Impact of breathing exercises in subjects with lung cancer undergoing surgical resection: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Thu, 2019-03-14 06:44
Related Articles

Impact of breathing exercises in subjects with lung cancer undergoing surgical resection: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Clin Nurs. 2019 Mar;28(5-6):717-732

Authors: Wang YQ, Liu X, Jia Y, Xie J

Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of breathing exercises on postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs), pulmonary function, 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and the length of hospital stay (LOS) in lung cancer patients undergoing lung surgery.
BACKGROUND: Lung cancer patients undergoing lung resection have poor pulmonary function and multiple PPCs. Breathing exercises may improve these symptoms.
DESIGN: Systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted.
METHODS: All entries to the following databases were searched up until 20 December 2017: PubMed, EMBASE Ovid, the Cochrane Central Register of Randomized Controlled Trials, Web of Science, Wanfang, Weipu and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. Only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the analysis.
RESULTS: A total of sixteen articles including nine articles in Chinese language and seven articles in English met the inclusion criteria. Breathing exercises decreased PPCs, and in addition, the incidence of pneumonia and atelectasis in the postoperative subgroup was reduced. Predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (predicted FEV1 %), predicted forced vital capacity (predicted FVC%), FVC and FEV1 /FVC ratio had improved after breathing exercises, but the changes in FEV1 were not statistically significant. Furthermore, the LOS was significantly decreased, but no improvements were found in 6MWD.
CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that breathing exercises could improve lung function, decrease the incidence of PPCs and LOS in a sample of lung cancer patients undergoing pulmonary surgery.
RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The analysis suggests that breathing exercises should be considered as a respiratory rehabilitation programme for lung cancer patients undergoing lung surgery in clinical practice.

PMID: 30357997 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Therapeutic challenges in comorbid obsessive compulsive disorder with substance use.

Thu, 2019-03-14 06:44
Related Articles

Therapeutic challenges in comorbid obsessive compulsive disorder with substance use.

Asian J Psychiatr. 2018 Jan;31:127-128

Authors: Jain S, Gupta T, Nebhinani N, Singhai K, Suthar N

PMID: 29482123 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Meditation induced psychosis: Case report.

Thu, 2019-03-14 06:44
Related Articles

Meditation induced psychosis: Case report.

Asian J Psychiatr. 2018 Jan;31:109-110

Authors: Prakash R, Aggarwal N, Kataria D, Prasad S

PMID: 29475163 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Guided imagery targeting exercise, food cravings, and stress: a multi-modal randomized feasibility trial.

Thu, 2019-03-14 06:44
Related Articles

Guided imagery targeting exercise, food cravings, and stress: a multi-modal randomized feasibility trial.

J Behav Med. 2018 02;41(1):87-98

Authors: Giacobbi P, Long D, Nolan R, Shawley S, Johnson K, Misra R

Abstract
The purpose of this randomized wait-list controlled trial was to test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a guided imagery based multi-behavior intervention intended to address psychological stress, food cravings, and physical activity. Personalized guided imagery scripts were created and participants were instructed to practice guided imagery every day for 35 consecutive days. Of 48 women who enrolled, we report comparisons between 16 randomized to treatment with 19 who were wait-listed (overall Mage = 45.50; Mbodymassindex = 31.43). Study completers reported 89% compliance with practicing guided imagery during the intervention. A significant time-by-group interaction was observed with reductions in food cravings and increases in physical activity compared with wait-list controls. Telephone-based multi-behavior interventions that utilize guided imagery to address food cravings and exercise behavior appear to be acceptable for overweight and obese women. Future phone-based guided imagery research testing this skill to address multiple health behaviors is justified.

PMID: 28766183 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Yoga positively affected depression and blood pressure in women with premenstrual syndrome in a randomized controlled clinical trial.

Wed, 2019-03-13 06:42
Related Articles

Yoga positively affected depression and blood pressure in women with premenstrual syndrome in a randomized controlled clinical trial.

Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2019 Feb;34:87-92

Authors: Ghaffarilaleh G, Ghaffarilaleh V, Sanamno Z, Kamalifard M

Abstract
Women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS) often complain about depression when their menstrual cycle begins. This study investigated the effects of yoga on women with PMS suffering from depression during menstrual cycle.
METHODS: This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted from April to October 2015 in Tabriz, Iran. All subjects (20-45 years old), who were frequently referred to the private obstetrics and gynecology clinics, were initially monitored for PMS and depression. Subjects completed the demographic and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) questionnaires before and after intervention. In addition, subjects were monitored for eligible and ineligible criteria. In this study 62 subjects were randomly selected for the yoga group and control groups. Subjects practiced yoga over two months in three sessions, the duration of each session was 60 min.
RESULTS: The general score of the depression after yoga intervention was statistically significant compared to the control group (P < 0.036) and yoga group before intervention (P < 0.001). The diastolic pressure decreased significantly after yoga intervention (P < 0.029). Yoga decreased the state of depression and diastolic pressure of the subjects with PMS complaining from depression.
CONCLUSION: We conclude that yoga has strong effects on depression symptoms and blood pressure, therefore it can be used as a complementary or alternative remedy for PMS patients.

PMID: 30712751 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of yoga-based interventions for maternal depression during pregnancy.

Wed, 2019-03-13 06:42
Related Articles

A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of yoga-based interventions for maternal depression during pregnancy.

Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2019 Feb;34:8-12

Authors: Ng QX, Venkatanarayanan N, Loke W, Yeo WS, Lim DY, Chan HW, Sim WS

Abstract
Prompt and effective treatment of maternal depression during pregnancy is important as it is an independent predictor of negative maternal and fetal outcomes. Yoga is an increasingly popular non-pharmacological modality. This study thus aimed to undertake a meta-analysis of the efficacy of yoga-based interventions for maternal depression during pregnancy. A total of 8 clinical studies were systematically reviewed, and 6 studies with a total of 405 pregnant mothers were included in the final meta-analysis. Applying per-protocol analysis and a random-effects model, the pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) from baseline depressive score was -0.452 (95% CI: -0.816 to -0.880, P = 0.015), supporting a statistically significant beneficial effect of yoga-based interventions on mood. Overall, yoga-based interventions are a promising non-pharmacological option, however, most trials examined were preliminary, recruited only participants with mild depression, did not blind study participants and had relatively small sample sizes. Larger randomized, controlled trials should be encouraged.

PMID: 30712750 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The effect of progressive muscle relaxation on cancer patients' self-efficacy.

Wed, 2019-03-13 06:42
Related Articles

The effect of progressive muscle relaxation on cancer patients' self-efficacy.

Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2019 Feb;34:70-75

Authors: Noruzi Zamenjani M, Masmouei B, Harorani M, Ghafarzadegan R, Davodabady F, Zahedi S, Davodabady Z

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Self-efficacy is considered as one of the influential parameters affecting the health of patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of relaxation techniques on self-efficacy of patients suffering from cancer.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a clinical trial in which 80 patients suffering from cancer were randomly assigned to two groups of experimental and control. Data collection instruments consisted of demographic information and Strategies Used by People to Promote Health questionnaires. In the experimental group, the patients performed relaxation techniques once a day for 30 min over two months. In the control group, the patients received the routine care.
RESULTS: A statistically significant difference was observed between the mean self-efficacy indices in the experimental group (p = 0.001). There was no significant difference in the control group (p = 0.3).
CONCLUSION: Muscle relaxation can enhance self-efficacy of cancer patients. Therefore, it can be used as an alternative method for patients who are willing to use this technique.

PMID: 30712748 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effect of lavender aromatherapy through inhalation on quality of life among postmenopausal women covered by a governmental health center in Isfahan, Iran: A single-blind clinical trial.

Wed, 2019-03-13 06:42
Related Articles

Effect of lavender aromatherapy through inhalation on quality of life among postmenopausal women covered by a governmental health center in Isfahan, Iran: A single-blind clinical trial.

Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2019 Feb;34:46-50

Authors: Bakhtiari S, Paki S, Khalili A, Baradaranfard F, Mosleh S, Jokar M

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Various studies indicate the negative effects of menopausal symptoms and complications on the quality of life (QOL) of women. The tendency to use different methods of complementary medicine to control menopausal symptoms is increasing. In addition, lavender essential oil has been shown to have positive effects on some symptoms associated with menopause. Thus, the present study was conducted with the aim to determine the effect of lavender aromatherapy on the QOL of postmenopausal women.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: A randomized, controlled, clinical trial was conducted on 62 postmenopausal women referred to health centers of Isfahan, Iran. The subjects were divided into two groups of control and intervention. The intervention group inhaled 2% lavender essential oil every night before bedtime for 20 minutes during one month. The control group received the placebo (distilled water) in the same manner as the intervention group. The data collection tools were the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL)and a demographic characteristics questionnaire. The results were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical tests in SPSS software.
RESULTS: The independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean total score of QOL and its various dimensions (vasomotor, psychosocial, physical, and sexual dimensions) after the intervention between the aromatherapy and placebo groups (P < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Inhalation aromatherapy using lavender essential oil can improve the QOL of postmenopausal women with a reduction in the severity of complications and physical-psychological symptoms.

PMID: 30712745 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effect of yoga on physical and psychological outcomes in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

Wed, 2019-03-13 06:42
Related Articles

Effect of yoga on physical and psychological outcomes in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2019 Feb;34:41-45

Authors: KauricKlein Z

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Patients on chronic hemodialysis suffer from a myriad of problems associated with dialysis including increased cardiovascular disease, deconditioning, fatigue, sleep disturbances, anxiety and depression, and decreased health related quality of life. Yoga has been reported to have positive effects on distress and functional performance in patients with chronic diseases. The effect of yoga in patients on chronic hemodialysis is unknown. For the purpose of this study, papers were reviewed to determine the effect of intradialysis yoga on distress and functional performance in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis.
METHODS: This integrative review examined studies published in Pubmed, CINAHL and PsychINFO. The search terms included: yoga, hemodialysis, dialysis.
RESULTS: Two RCTs met the criteria. Yoga showed improvement in several outcomes including: quality of life, pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, physical function as well as a number of biochemical variables. Further well designed RCTs need to be conducted.

PMID: 30712744 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The effects of Inquiry-Based Stress Reduction (IBSR) on mental health and well-being among a non-clinical sample.

Wed, 2019-03-13 06:42
Related Articles

The effects of Inquiry-Based Stress Reduction (IBSR) on mental health and well-being among a non-clinical sample.

Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2019 Feb;34:30-34

Authors: Smernoff E, Mitnik I, Lev-Ari S

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mental problems are highly common among the general population. Mind-body interventions were found to be highly effective in treating them. The current study assessed the effect of Inquiry-Based Stress Reduction (IBSR) meditation on psychological parameters in a general population sample.
METHODS: Ninety-seven Participants enrolled in a 28-day workshop and completed a set of self-administered measures before and after the workshop. Outcome measures included Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomology-Self Report (QIDS-SR16), Outcome Questionnaire OQ-45.2, The Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form (STAI), State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI) (State), Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS), Eating Attitudes Test (EAT).
RESULTS: BDI scale decreased significantly before and after the intervention. QIDS scale improved significantly from T1 to T2 (p < 0.001). Outcome questionnaire decreased significantly at T2. Quality of life scores improved significantly between T1 and T2 (p < 0.001). Anxiety state and trait scores decreased significantly after the intervention (p < 0.001) All the subscales of anger decreased significantly after the intervention (p < 0.001).Subjective happiness improved significantly (p < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: IBSR meditation improved various psychological scales among a general population sample. Further controlled studies should evaluate the clinical implementation of IBSR among the general population.

PMID: 30712742 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The effects of qigong on neck pain: A systematic review.

Wed, 2019-03-13 06:42
Related Articles

The effects of qigong on neck pain: A systematic review.

Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2019 Feb;34:23-29

Authors: Girard J, Girard A

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal condition that affects a large portion of the population. It is not known if qigong affects neck pain. The purpose of this review is to systematically review the effects of qigong in subjects with neck pain.
METHODS: A systematic review of literature indexed in the following databases: PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and SportsDiscus, was conducted and methodologically graded using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale (PEDro).
RESULTS: Five studies satisfied criteria and were included in this review. The majority of included studies found that qigong had a significant effect on neck pain or disability (95% CI). Qigong was not generally more effective than exercise therapy groups.
CONCLUSION: The findings of this systematic review indicate that qigong might have a beneficial effect in some individuals with neck pain, although not necessarily more effective than therapeutic exercise.

PMID: 30712732 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Yoga led by a physical therapist for individuals with Essential Tremor: An explorative pilot study.

Wed, 2019-03-13 06:42
Related Articles

Yoga led by a physical therapist for individuals with Essential Tremor: An explorative pilot study.

Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2019 Feb;34:17-22

Authors: Vance NE, Ulanowski EA, Danzl MM

Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the outcomes for individuals with Essential Tremor (ET) who participate in a community-based yoga class, led by a neurologic physical therapist.
METHODS: Six subjects with ET completed an 8-week intervention consisting of weekly 1-h yoga classes (in the Vinyasa style) guided by an instructor (200-h registered yoga teacher, physical therapist, and neurological resident).
RESULTS: Five subjects demonstrated improvements on the Tremor Research Group Essential Tremor Rating Scale (mean 15.3%, range 8.3-34.7%). The mean improvement on the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale was 10.8% (range 2.5-20%). Five subjects maintained pre-intervention anxiety levels ("very low") while one reported increased anxiety secondary to a non-study related factor. Minimal improvements were noted in the McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire.
CONCLUSION: This pilot study offers support for further examining the benefits of integration of yoga into an exercise program for individuals with ET and specific suggestions for future research are offered. There were no adverse events with participation in yoga.

PMID: 30712723 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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