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Task specificity and the timing of discrete aiming movements.

Tue, 2019-05-14 08:40
Related Articles

Task specificity and the timing of discrete aiming movements.

Hum Mov Sci. 2019 Apr;64:240-251

Authors: Hsieh TY, Liu YT, Newell KM

Abstract
In discrete aiming movements the task criteria of time-minimization to a spatial target (e.g., Fitts, 1954) and time-matching to a spatial-temporal goal (e.g., Schmidt et al., 1979) tend to produce different functions of the speed-accuracy trade-off. Here we examined whether the task-related movement speed-accuracy characteristics were due to differential space-time trade-offs in time-matching, velocity-matching and time-minimizing task goals. Twenty participants performed 100 aiming trials for each of 15 combinations of task-type (3) and space-time condition (5). The prevalence of the primary types of sub-movement (none, pre-peak, post-peak, undershooting and overshooting) was determined from the kinematics of the movement trajectory. There were comparable distributions of trajectory sub-movement profiles and space-time movement outcomes across the three tasks at the short movement duration that became increasingly dissimilar over decreasing movement velocity and increasing movement time conditions. Movement time was the most influential variable in mediating sub-movement characteristics and the spatial/temporal outcome accuracy and variability of discrete aiming tasks - a role that was magnified in the explicit task demands of time-matching. The time-matching and time-minimization task goals in discrete aiming induce qualitatively different control processes that progressively contribute beyond the minimal time conditions to task-specific space-time accuracy and variability characteristics of the respective movement speed-accuracy functions.

PMID: 30802800 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Acute Cardiovascular Responses to a Session of Bikram Yoga: A Pilot Uncontrolled Trial.

Tue, 2019-05-14 08:40
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Acute Cardiovascular Responses to a Session of Bikram Yoga: A Pilot Uncontrolled Trial.

J Altern Complement Med. 2019 Apr;25(4):398-405

Authors: Miranda Hurtado M, Meza Valladares C, Eblen-Zajjur A, Rodriguez-Fernandez M

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Main cardiovascular parameters such as heart rate (HR), blood pressure, and myocardial oxygen consumption (MOC) are tightly regulated by a multifactorial, nonlinear control system. Increased HR because of physical activity is often accompanied by an increase in blood pressure. Postural changes have an effect on the baroreceptors, and stretching exercises and isometric contractions modulate muscle mechanoreceptors eliciting increases in blood pressure. However, a hot environment increases the core temperature inducing vasodilation and plasma volume changes that might contribute to a drop in blood pressure. During the practice of Bikram yoga, all these factors converge and little is known about the resulting changes in blood pressure and MOC.
METHODS: Sixteen apparently healthy female volunteers, regular practitioners of Bikram yoga, were evaluated during a 90 min session. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured immediately after each posture and HR was measured continuously during the practice.
RESULTS: HR and estimated MOC increased significantly over baseline during the exercise (+62.3% and +63.6%, respectively). HR mean value across the entire Bikram yoga session was 126.6 ± 14.3 bpm reaching a maximum of 168.1 ± 20.2 bpm. SBP was not significantly increased over baseline at any time during the practice with a mean value of 117.0 ± 10.1 mmHg and DBP was significantly decreased over baseline most of the time (-10.1%, mean 71.2 ± 7.3 mmHg) with particular decline toward the end of the practice during the floor postures.
CONCLUSIONS: DBP during the practice of Bikram yoga was significantly different from that previously reported for nonheated Hatha yoga for normotensive subjects. Further studies evaluating the same group at both conditions are needed to better characterize the magnitude of the changes in HR, SBP, DBP, and MOC.

PMID: 30698456 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The Effectiveness of a Virtual Reality-Based Tai Chi Exercise on Cognitive and Physical Function in Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment.

Tue, 2019-05-14 08:40
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The Effectiveness of a Virtual Reality-Based Tai Chi Exercise on Cognitive and Physical Function in Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment.

Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2018;46(5-6):358-370

Authors: Hsieh CC, Lin PS, Hsu WC, Wang JS, Huang YC, Lim AY, Hsu YC

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Tai Chi (TC) is a Chinese mind-body exercise with proven physical and psychological benefits. A modified TC via virtual reality (VR) may be suitable for the elderly owing to the immediate guidance and feedback regarding movement accuracy. This study explored the cognitive and physical effects of a VR-based TC (VRTC) exercise program on older adults with cognitive impairment (CI).
METHODS: Sixty older adults with CI were cluster-assigned to either the VRTC or the control group; the intervention was conducted twice weekly for 6 months. Outcomes included cognitive and physical functions. The movement accuracy score and attendance were recorded. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) and multiple regression analyses were performed.
RESULTS: Adjusted GEE analysis showed significant interaction effects in the 6-min walk test, 30-s sit-to-stand test, functional reach, 5-m gait speed, and abstract thinking and judgment. Overall, medium to large effect sizes (d = 0.50-0.82) were found in favor of the VRTC group. The average movement accuracy score in the first 3 months significantly predicted improvement in cognitive performance (p = 0.011).
CONCLUSIONS: The VRTC exercise posed a protective effect for some cognitive and physical functions in older adults with CI. The more engaging the program, the greater the improvement in the cognitive performance.

PMID: 30537752 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The role of personality in patients with fibromyalgia.

Tue, 2019-05-14 08:40
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The role of personality in patients with fibromyalgia.

Clin Rheumatol. 2019 Jan;38(1):149-157

Authors: Seto A, Han X, Price LL, Harvey WF, Bannuru RR, Wang C

Abstract
Previous studies suggest personality, the multifaceted characteristics underlying a person's affect, cognition, and behavior, may influence fibromyalgia. We examined associations among personality, fibromyalgia impact, and health-related outcomes in patients with fibromyalgia. We further tested whether anxiety and depression mediated the effect of personality on fibromyalgia impact. We performed a secondary analysis using baseline data from a randomized trial on fibromyalgia. Personality was assessed using the NEO-Five Factor Inventory 3. Fibromyalgia impact was evaluated using the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR). We also measured symptom severity, anxiety, depression, stress, quality of life, social support, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and mindfulness. Multivariable linear regression was performed to evaluate each association. Mediation analysis assessed whether anxiety and depression mediated the relationship between personality and FIQR. There were 92 participants, 95% female, mean age 52 years, body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m2, 52% white, and mean duration of body pain 14 years. Higher neuroticism was significantly associated with higher FIQR (P = 0.002) and symptom severity (P = 0.008), as well as higher levels of anxiety, depression and stress, worse mental component quality of life, and lower self-efficacy, mindfulness, and social support. Higher conscientiousness and extraversion were associated with better psychological health and health-related outcomes. The effect of neuroticism on fibromyalgia impact was mediated by anxiety and depression. Personality was associated with fibromyalgia impact and a variety of health outcomes. Identifying the factors that influence fibromyalgia will help us better understand the condition and provide insight for more effective treatment.

PMID: 30276562 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Qigong intervention for breast cancer survivors with complaints of decreased cognitive function.

Tue, 2019-05-14 08:40
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Qigong intervention for breast cancer survivors with complaints of decreased cognitive function.

Support Care Cancer. 2019 Apr;27(4):1395-1403

Authors: Myers JS, Mitchell M, Krigel S, Steinhoff A, Boyce-White A, Van Goethem K, Valla M, Dai J, He J, Liu W, Sereika SM, Bender CM

Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of an 8-week Qigong intervention to improve objectively and subjectively assessed cognitive function in breast cancer survivors who were 2 months to 8 years post completion of chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
METHODS: A randomized, single-blind, three-arm intervention pilot was conducted to compare Qigong to gentle exercise and survivorship support. Feasibility was measured by recruitment, group session attendance, and adherence to home practice for the two exercise groups. Changes in self-report and objectively measured cognitive function were compared between the three groups from baseline (T1) to completion of the intervention (T2) and 4 weeks post intervention (T3).
RESULTS: Fifty participants consented (83% of desired sample) with an overall attrition rate of 28%. Attrition was highest for the gentle exercise group (50%). Group attendance adherence ranged from 44 to 67%. The a priori established rate of 75% weekly attendance was not achieved, nor was the goal of 75% adherence to home practice for the two exercise groups (7 to 41%). Self-report of cognitive function improved most for the Qigong group (p = .01). Improvement was demonstrated for the Trail Making A (gentle exercise, p = .007) and F-A-S verbal fluency (support group, p = .02) tests. Qigong participants reported the most reduction of distress (p = .02).
CONCLUSIONS: The study results suggest that mindfulness-based exercise may be superior to gentle exercise alone or survivorship support for improving self-report of cognitive function and distress after treatment for breast cancer. The mindfulness component may enhance the positive impact of exercise on cognitive function.

PMID: 30128855 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Neuromodulation for tinnitus treatment: an overview of invasive and non-invasive techniques.

Tue, 2019-05-14 08:40
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Neuromodulation for tinnitus treatment: an overview of invasive and non-invasive techniques.

J Zhejiang Univ Sci B. 2019 Feb.;20(2):116-130

Authors: Peter N, Kleinjung T

Abstract
Tinnitus is defined as a perception of sound without any external sound source. Chronic tinnitus is a frequent condition that can affect the quality of life. So far, no causal cure for tinnitus has been documented, and most pharmacologic and psychosomatic treatment modalities aim to diminish tinnitus' impact on the quality of life. Neuromodulation, a novel therapeutic modality, which aims at alternating nerve activity through a targeted delivery of a stimulus, has emerged as a potential option in tinnitus treatment. This review provides a brief overview of the current neuromodulation techniques as tinnitus treatment options. The main intention is to provide updated knowledge especially for medical professionals counselling tinnitus patients in this emerging field of medicine. Non-invasive methods such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial electrical stimulation, neurofeedback, and transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation were included, as well as invasive methods such as implanted vagus nerve stimulation and invasive brain stimulation. Some of these neuromodulation techniques revealed promising results; nevertheless, further research is needed, especially regarding the pathophysiological principle as to how these neuromodulation techniques work and what neuronal change they induce. Various studies suggest that individually different brain states and networks are involved in the generation and perception of tinnitus. Therefore, in the future, individually tailored neuromodulation strategies could be a promising approach in tinnitus treatment for achieving a more substantial and longer lasting improvement of complaints.

PMID: 29770647 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effectiveness of extrinsic feedback for management of non-specific low back pain: a systematic review protocol.

Tue, 2019-05-14 08:40
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Effectiveness of extrinsic feedback for management of non-specific low back pain: a systematic review protocol.

BMJ Open. 2018 05 05;8(5):e021259

Authors: Ribeiro DC, Mącznik AK, Milosavljevic S, Abbott JH

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Low back pain is the greatest cause of years lived with disability worldwide and is linked with high societal and economic burden. Neuromuscular control impairments are a common clinical presentation in patients with non-specific low back pain. Musculoskeletal physiotherapists commonly use feedback as a part of the management of low back disorders. This systematic review will aim to assess the effectiveness of extrinsic biofeedback for reducing pain, disability and recurrence of pain in patients with non-specific low back pain.
METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Systematic searches will be performed in CINAHL, Embase, Medline, PsycInfo, Scopus and Web of Science. We will include randomised controlled trial studies, if the study recruited patients with non-specific low back pain; compared extrinsic feedback versus either placebo or control; another intervention; or in addition to an intervention versus that intervention alone; and have used pain, disability scores or low back pain recurrence as outcome measures. We will exclude studies with designs other than randomised controlled trials. We will assess the risk of bias within included studies using the PEDro scale, and the strength of evidence using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach.
ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval and patient consent are not required since this is a systematic review based on published studies. The results of this study will be published in an international peer-reviewed journal.
PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42017077888.

PMID: 29730631 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Yoga and immune system functioning: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

Tue, 2019-05-14 08:40
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Yoga and immune system functioning: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

J Behav Med. 2018 08;41(4):467-482

Authors: Falkenberg RI, Eising C, Peters ML

Abstract
Yoga is an ancient mind-body practice that is increasingly recognized to have health benefits in a variety of clinical and non-clinical conditions. This systematic review summarizes the findings of randomized controlled trials examining the effects of yoga on immune system functioning which is imperative to justify its application in the clinic. Fifteen RCTs were eligible for the review. Even though the existing evidence is not entirely consistent, a general pattern emerged suggesting that yoga can downregulate pro-inflammatory markers. In particular, the qualitative evaluation of RCTs revealed decreases in IL-1beta, as well as indications for reductions in IL-6 and TNF-alpha. These results imply that yoga may be implemented as a complementary intervention for populations at risk or already suffering from diseases with an inflammatory component. Beyond this, yoga practice may exert further beneficial effects by enhancing cell-mediated and mucosal immunity. It is hypothesized that longer time spans of yoga practice are required to achieve consistent effects especially on circulating inflammatory markers. Overall, this field of investigation is still young, hence the current body of evidence is small and for most immune parameters, more research is required to draw distinct conclusions.

PMID: 29429046 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Tai Chi and Qigong for cancer-related symptoms and quality of life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Tue, 2019-05-14 08:40
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Tai Chi and Qigong for cancer-related symptoms and quality of life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Cancer Surviv. 2018 04;12(2):256-267

Authors: Wayne PM, Lee MS, Novakowski J, Osypiuk K, Ligibel J, Carlson LE, Song R

Abstract
PURPOSE: This study aims to summarize and critically evaluate the effects of Tai Chi and Qigong (TCQ) mind-body exercises on symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in cancer survivors.
METHODS: A systematic search in four electronic databases targeted randomized and non-randomized clinical studies evaluating TCQ for fatigue, sleep difficulty, depression, pain, and QOL in cancer patients, published through August 2016. Meta-analysis was used to estimate effect sizes (ES, Hedges' g) and publication bias for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methodological bias in RCTs was assessed.
RESULTS: Our search identified 22 studies, including 15 RCTs that evaluated 1283 participants in total, 75% women. RCTs evaluated breast (n = 7), prostate (n = 2), lymphoma (n = 1), lung (n = 1), or combined (n = 4) cancers. RCT comparison groups included active intervention (n = 7), usual care (n = 5), or both (n = 3). Duration of TCQ training ranged from 3 to 12 weeks. Methodological bias was low in 12 studies and high in 3 studies. TCQ was associated with significant improvement in fatigue (ES = - 0.53, p < 0.001), sleep difficulty (ES = - 0.49, p = 0.018), depression (ES = - 0.27, p = 0.001), and overall QOL (ES = 0.33, p = 0.004); a statistically non-significant trend was observed for pain (ES = - 0.38, p = 0.136). Random effects models were used for meta-analysis based on Q test and I 2 criteria. Funnel plots suggest some degree of publication bias. Findings in non-randomized studies largely paralleled meta-analysis results.
CONCLUSIONS: Larger and methodologically sound trials with longer follow-up periods and appropriate comparison groups are needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn, and cancer- and symptom-specific recommendations can be made.
IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: TCQ shows promise in addressing cancer-related symptoms and QOL in cancer survivors.

PMID: 29222705 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Non-pharmacological interventions for reducing mental distress in patients undergoing dental procedures: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

Tue, 2019-05-14 08:40
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Non-pharmacological interventions for reducing mental distress in patients undergoing dental procedures: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Dent. 2018 02;69:22-31

Authors: Burghardt S, Koranyi S, Magnucki G, Strauss B, Rosendahl J

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This meta-analysis investigates the efficacy of non-pharmacological interventions in adults undergoing dental procedures under regional or general anesthesia compared to standard care alone or an attention control group on the reduction of mental distress, pain, and analgesic use.
DATA SOURCES: To identify relevant papers a comprehensive literature search was carried out in MEDLINE, CENTRAL, Web of Science, and PsycINFO (last search August 2017). Additionally, lists of references of relevant articles and previous reviews were checked. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Full Text Database was screened to identify any unpublished material.
STUDY SELECTION: A total of 29 eligible randomized controlled trials were included, comprising a total of 2.886 patients. Included trials investigated the effects of hypnosis, enhanced information, relaxation, music, or cognitive-behavioral approaches including distraction.
RESULTS: Random effects meta-analyses revealed significant positive treatment effects on the reduction of mental distress (g = 0.58, CI 95% [0.39; 0.76]). Effects on pain relief (g = 0.00, CI 95% [-0.28; 0.28]) and the reduction of analgesic use (g = 0.26, CI 95% [-0.22; 0.73]) were not significant. Because effects on mental distress were substantially heterogeneous, subgroup analyses were run yielding significantly larger effects for studies with low risk of bias compared to studies with high or unclear risk of selection and attrition bias. No significant differences appeared between various types of non-pharmacological interventions.
CONCLUSIONS: In summary, benefits of non-pharmacological interventions on reducing mental distress were demonstrated with largest effects being shown for hypnosis. However, further high quality trials are needed to strengthen the promising evidence.
CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that non-pharmacological interventions may be beneficial for reducing mental distress in patients undergoing dental procedures and could thus be considered as valuable adjunct to standard care.

PMID: 29154798 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Perceived Exertion and Affect From Tai Chi, Yoga, and Stretching Classes for Elderly Women.

Sat, 2019-05-11 08:33
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Perceived Exertion and Affect From Tai Chi, Yoga, and Stretching Classes for Elderly Women.

Percept Mot Skills. 2019 Apr;126(2):223-240

Authors: Follador L, Alves RC, Ferreira SDS, Silva AC, Silva SGD

Abstract
Tai Chi, yoga, and stretching regimens are gaining popularity as alternatives to more traditional exercise, but there is scant research regarding participants' perceived exertion and affective responses to these practices. We compared experienced states of perceived exertion, feelings of pleasure/displeasure, and arousal in 70 elderly women enrolled in groups of Tai Chi ( n = 26), yoga ( n = 25), or stretching ( n = 19) classes. Mean rates of perceived exertion, feelings of pleasure, and arousal responses were significantly higher over the time course of all three groups, while the overall mean perceived exertion ( Somewhat Hard on the Borg CR-10 scale) and pleasure responses (∼ Very Good on the Feeling Scale) were similar between them. The circumplex model of affect showed that changes occurred in the high-activation pleasure quadrant (energy on the Felt Arousal Scale). From a practical perspective, the exercise intensity and affective responses elicited during these classes made participants feel good and infused with energy, likely creating a positive memory and reinforcing continued physical activity participation.

PMID: 30638426 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[HYPNOSIS AND SELF-HYPNOSIS IN THE PRACTICE OF GYNECOLOGY, OBSTETRICS AND FERTILITY].

Sat, 2019-05-11 08:33
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[HYPNOSIS AND SELF-HYPNOSIS IN THE PRACTICE OF GYNECOLOGY, OBSTETRICS AND FERTILITY].

Harefuah. 2018 Nov;157(11):721-725

Authors: Sheldon SE

Abstract

PMID: 30457237 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Exploratory Study of Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) Real-Time Z-Score Feedback in the Treatment of Pain in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer.

Sat, 2019-05-11 08:33
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Exploratory Study of Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) Real-Time Z-Score Feedback in the Treatment of Pain in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer.

Brain Topogr. 2019 03;32(2):283-285

Authors: Prinsloo S, Rosenthal DI, Lyle R, Garcia SM, Gabel-Zepeda S, Cannon R, Bruera E, Cohen L

Abstract
Acute pain from mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing radiation therapy (RT) is common, and may not respond well to narcotics. We used low resolution electromagnetic tomography z-score neurofeedback (LFBz) to investigate whether patients could modify brain wave activity associated with acute pain and whether this would reduce the experience of pain. HNC patients scheduled for RT had baseline pre-pain onset measures (EEG and numeric rating scale) collected before RT and then at pain onset before using analgesics, after each LFBz session and at the end of RT. Up to six sessions of LFBz training were offered over the remaining RT. Up to six 20-min sessions of LFBz were offered over the remaining RT. Data were collected before and after each LFBz session and at the end of RT. Seventeen patients recruited; fourteen were treated and reported decreased pain perception. LFBz allowed patients to modify their brain activity in predesignated areas of the pain matrix toward the direction of their baseline, pre-pain condition (including Brodmann areas (BAs) 3, 4, 5, 13, 24, and 33). LFBz can modify brain regions relevant for pain and these changes were associated with self-reported decreases in pain perception.

PMID: 30426267 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[FMRI Neurofeedback and its Application to Psychiatric Disorders].

Sat, 2019-05-11 08:33
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[FMRI Neurofeedback and its Application to Psychiatric Disorders].

Brain Nerve. 2018 Nov;70(11):1209-1216

Authors: Tose K, Yoshihara Y, Takahashi H

Abstract
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neurofeedback can train subjects to control their brain activity with real-time processing and high spatial resolution, as many advances in MRI data acquisition methods, computer hardware, and processing algorithms have improved the sensitivity and speed of fMRI neurofeedback. FMRI neurofeedback has been applied to psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Some studies reported that fMRI neurofeedback improved the symptoms of patients with psychiatric disorders, although it remains unclear if the regulation of the targeted brain regions or the functional connectivities themselves improved the symptoms. It is necessary that researchers pay enough attention to their study's design, because many non-specific factors such as introduction, mental strategies, self-efficacy, attention, motivation, learning ability, and reward influence the results in fMRI neurofeedback studies. If the long-term effect of fMRI neurofeedback on the symptoms of psychiatric disorders are recognized, fMRI neurofeedback will be useful in treating heterogeneous patients with psychiatric disorders without side effects.

PMID: 30416114 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Identifying Potential Mechanisms of Action Underlying Neurofeedback Treatment Response in Depression.

Sat, 2019-05-11 08:33
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Identifying Potential Mechanisms of Action Underlying Neurofeedback Treatment Response in Depression.

Biol Psychiatry. 2017 10 15;82(8):547-548

Authors: Hampson M

PMID: 28935097 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The effect of yoga on stress level in infertile women.

Fri, 2019-05-10 08:31
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The effect of yoga on stress level in infertile women.

Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2019 Apr;55(2):319-327

Authors: Kirca N, Pasinlioglu T

Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of planned yoga practices on stress levels in infertile women.
DESIGN AND METHODS: This randomized controlled study included 128 volunteer women who were registered at a private in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinic and received infertility treatment. The patients in the experimental group took part in the yoga program twice a week for 6 weeks. A personal information form and The Copenhagen Multi-center Psychosocial Infertility (COMPI) Fertility Problem Stress Scale were used to collect data.
FINDINGS: The differences between the mean scores of the control and experimental groups on the COMPI Fertility Problem Stress Scale at pre- and posttests were statistically significant (P < 0.05).
PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Because yoga practices may be effective in reducing stress in infertile women, these applications can be performed before treatment. It may reduce patients' stress and increase the success of the treatment. These findings indicate that yoga could reduce stress levels in infertile women.

PMID: 30657179 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Current Concepts in Upper-Extremity Amputation.

Fri, 2019-05-10 08:31
Related Articles

Current Concepts in Upper-Extremity Amputation.

J Hand Surg Am. 2018 07;43(7):657-667

Authors: Pierrie SN, Gaston RG, Loeffler BJ

Abstract
Advances in motor vehicle safety, trauma care, combat body armor, and cancer treatment have enhanced the life expectancy and functional expectations of patients with upper-extremity amputations. Upper-extremity surgeons have multiple surgical options to optimize the potential of emerging prosthetic technologies for this diverse patient group. Targeted muscle reinnervation is an evolving technique that improves control of myoelectric prostheses and can prevent or treat symptomatic neuromas. This review addresses current strategies for the care of patients with amputations proximal to the wrist with an emphasis on recent advancements in surgical techniques and prostheses.

PMID: 29871787 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effectiveness of super brain yoga for children with hyperactivity disorder.

Fri, 2019-05-10 08:31
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Effectiveness of super brain yoga for children with hyperactivity disorder.

Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2019 Apr;55(2):140-146

Authors: Farahani PV, Hekmatpou D, Khonsari AH, Gholami M

Abstract
PURPOSE: This study aimed at determining the effectiveness of super brain yoga for children with hyperactivity disorder.
DESIGN AND METHOD: This quasiexperimental and interventional research was conducted on 80 school-age children through a pretest-posttest design.
RESULTS: Results showed that there was a significant difference between the means of severity of hyperactivity disorder before (75.1) and after the intervention (63.5) (p < .001).
PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Practicing super brain yoga reduced the symptoms of hyperactivity disorder among the school-age children.

PMID: 29427513 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Combined Ayurveda and Yoga Practices for Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Controlled Trial.

Fri, 2019-05-10 08:31
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Combined Ayurveda and Yoga Practices for Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Controlled Trial.

Complement Med Res. 2018;25(1):16-23

Authors: Datey P, Hankey A, Nagendra HR

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes in India is a cause for national concern, particularly the spiraling cost burden to the country. As one approach to stop its increase, Yoga medicine has been widely implemented, finding popularity with all social strata. Here, we report a study suggesting that treatment with fresh herbal juices and Yoga can improve the levels of blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in people with pre-diabetes.
METHODS: Study design: 3-arm controlled trial 3 months in duration.
PARTICIPANTS: 157 male prisoners with newly diagnosed, high fasting blood sugar (FBS) and postprandial blood sugar (PPBS) levels. Group interventions: (1) Rasahara and Yoga, (2) Yoga, (3) no intervention.
ASSESSMENTS: FBS and PPBS levels were measured every 2 weeks; HbA1c and blood lipids were determined pre- and post-intervention.
RESULTS: Significant decreases occurred in the FBS (-21.13 ± 21.16 mg/dl) and PPBS levels (-15.02 ± 14.89 mg/dl) in group 1 (both p < 0.0001) and in the FBS level (20.62 ± 32.68 mg/dl) in group 2 (p = 0.0005), while the increases in group 3 attained significance only for the PPBS level (9.62 ± 21.83 mg/dl) (p = 0.0022). Observed changes in HbA1c were: group 1, -0.044 ± 0.059 mg/dl; group 2, +0.024 ± 0.456 mg/dl (not significant); and group 3, +0.365 ± 0.369 mg/dl (p < 0.0001).
CONCLUSIONS: This study of Yoga for the treatment of diabetes shows that all male prisoners could benefit from the Yoga prison programs. Addition of Yoga programs to state and federal activities at all levels is now national policy in India. Follow-up studies should be carried out to obtain more robust results.

PMID: 28957795 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Treatment of Chronic Lower Back Pain: Study Protocol of a Comparative Effectiveness Study on Yoga, Eurythmy Therapy, and Physiotherapeutic Exercises.

Fri, 2019-05-10 08:31
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Treatment of Chronic Lower Back Pain: Study Protocol of a Comparative Effectiveness Study on Yoga, Eurythmy Therapy, and Physiotherapeutic Exercises.

Complement Med Res. 2018;25(1):24-29

Authors: Büssing A, Poier D, Ostermann T, Kröz M, Michalsen A

Abstract
BACKGROUND: We aim to compare the effectiveness of 3 active interventions, i.e., yoga, eurythmy therapy, and physiotherapeutic exercise, on chronic lower back pain.
METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial over 16 weeks (8 weeks of intervention, 8 weeks of follow-up), data of individuals with chronic lower back pain will be analyzed. Interventions are implemented as group sessions (75 min) once per week. Participants receive a manual for home-based practice and are assessed before and at the end of the 8-week intervention period, and at the end of an 8-week follow-up period. Standardized questionnaires are: the Roland-Morris Disability Score, visual analog scales measuring intensity of pain, the Brief Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, the Inner Correspondence with the Practices questionnaire, the Freiburg Mindfulness Questionnaire, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, a self-regulation questionnaire, the Internal Coherence Scale, a pain diary (registering the need of analgesic medication), and a questionnaire on the patients' expectation that the interventions will be effective in reducing pain and how strong this reduction might be (2 single items), etc.
DISCUSSION: This large multicenter study will provide evidence on the effectiveness of 3 contrasting movement-orientated treatments that share some similarities but differ in essential details: yoga, eurythmy therapy, and physiotherapeutic exercises. It will provide important data on non-pharmacological options to treat lower back pain in a large group of affected individuals.

PMID: 28675892 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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