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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]
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A Comparison of the Efficacy of Acupuncture and Hypnotherapy in Patients With Migraine.

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:57
Related Articles

A Comparison of the Efficacy of Acupuncture and Hypnotherapy in Patients With Migraine.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2018 Oct-Dec;66(4):371-385

Authors: Tastan K, Ozer Disci O, Set T

Abstract
This study investigated the effect of acupuncture, hypnotherapy, and pharmacotherapy in migraine treatments among 90 patients. They were divided into 3 groups of 30 persons each. Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3 were treated with acupuncture, hypnotherapy, and pharmacotherapy, respectively. Changes in the visual analog scale (VAS) and Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) scores from baseline were monitored. Reductions in the percentages of the VAS and MIDAS scores at the end of the third month were significantly higher in the acupuncture and hypnotherapy groups than those of the pharmacotherapy group (p < .01). Acupuncture and hypnotherapy can be developed as treatment options alone as an equivalent to conventional treatment.

PMID: 30152732 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Efficacy of practising Tai Chi for older people with mild dementia: protocol for a randomised controlled study.

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:57
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Efficacy of practising Tai Chi for older people with mild dementia: protocol for a randomised controlled study.

BMJ Open. 2018 05 14;8(5):e019940

Authors: Lyu J, Li W, Rong X, Wei L, Huang N, Champ M, Xiong Q, Chen X, Li M, Li F

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Many studies suggest that Tai Chi exercise is a safe and appropriate mind-body exercise for older people and effectively slows down age-related cognitive decline. A set of bespoke Tai Chi exercise named 'Cognition Protecting Tai Chi' (CPT) has been created for older people with cognitive impairments by the research team of geriatricians, neurologists, rehabilitation specialists, experts of sports medicine and experienced practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine. This trial is designed to evaluate its effects on cognitive function, behaviour/moods, risk of falls and activities of daily living of the participants with mild dementia.
METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A randomised controlled study will be conducted. Eighty participants with mild dementia will be recruited and randomly allocated to an intervention group and a control group. The intervention group will practice the CPT exercise three times a week for 20 min each time under the guidance of professional therapists. The control group will continue receiving their routine treatments. The duration of this study will be 10 months. All participants will be assessed with a battery of neuropsychological and functional evaluations, which include Mini Mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, the WHO-University of California Los Angeles-Auditory Verbal Learning test (WHO-UCLA-AVLT), Trail Making Test (TMT), Geriatric Depression Scale, Neuropsychological Inventory and Barthel Index, at the baseline, 5 and 10 months during the study period. Fall incident will also be recorded. The primary outcome will be the WHO-UCLA-AVLT delayed recall score. The secondary outcome will be the TMT score.
ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has been approved by the ethical review committee of the Beijing Geriatric Hospital (protocol number: 2015-021). Informed consent will be obtained from all participants or their guardians. The authors intend to submit the findings of the study to peer-reviewed journals or academic conferences to be published.
TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ChiCTR-INR-16009872; Pre-results.

PMID: 29764877 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Insight meditation and telomere biology: The effects of intensive retreat and the moderating role of personality.

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:57
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Insight meditation and telomere biology: The effects of intensive retreat and the moderating role of personality.

Brain Behav Immun. 2018 05;70:233-245

Authors: Conklin QA, King BG, Zanesco AP, Lin J, Hamidi AB, Pokorny JJ, Álvarez-López MJ, Cosín-Tomás M, Huang C, Kaliman P, Epel ES, Saron CD

Abstract
A growing body of evidence suggests that meditation training may have a range of salubrious effects, including improved telomere regulation. Telomeres and the enzyme telomerase interact with a variety of molecular components to regulate cell-cycle signaling cascades, and are implicated in pathways linking psychological stress to disease. We investigated the effects of intensive meditation practice on these biomarkers by measuring changes in telomere length (TL), telomerase activity (TA), and telomere-related gene (TRG) expression during a 1-month residential Insight meditation retreat. Multilevel analyses revealed an apparent TL increase in the retreat group, compared to a group of experienced meditators, similarly comprised in age and gender, who were not on retreat. Moreover, personality traits predicted changes in TL, such that retreat participants highest in neuroticism and lowest in agreeableness demonstrated the greatest increases in TL. Changes observed in TRGs further suggest retreat-related improvements in telomere maintenance, including increases in Gar1 and HnRNPA1, which encode proteins that bind telomerase RNA and telomeric DNA. Although no group-level changes were observed in TA, retreat participants' TA levels at post-assessment were inversely related to several indices of retreat engagement and prior meditation experience. Neuroticism also predicted variation in TA across retreat. These findings suggest that meditation training in a retreat setting may have positive effects on telomere regulation, which are moderated by individual differences in personality and meditation experience. (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT03056105).

PMID: 29518528 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Assistance of Medical Clowns Improves the Physical Examinations of Children Aged 2-6 Years.

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:57
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Assistance of Medical Clowns Improves the Physical Examinations of Children Aged 2-6 Years.

Isr Med Assoc J. 2017 Dec;19(12):786-791

Authors: Meiri N, Ankri A, Ziadan F, Nahmias I, Konopnicki M, Schnapp Z, Itzhak Sagi O, Hamad Saied M, Pillar G

Abstract
BACKGROUND: A good physical exam is necessary to help pediatricians make the correct diagnosis and can save unnecessary imaging or invasive procedures. Distraction by medical clowns may create the optimal conditions for a proper physical examination.
METHODS: Children aged 2-6 years who required physical examination in the pediatric emergency department were recruited and randomly assigned to one of two groups: physical exam by a pediatrician in the presence of caregivers vs. physical exam with the assistance of a medical clown. Outcome measures consisted of the level of child's discomfort, anxiety, and the quality of the physical examination.
RESULTS: Ninety three children participated. Mean age was 3.3 ± 3.6 years (range 2-6). The duration of the physical exam was similar between the clown and control groups (4.6 ± 1.4 minutes vs. 4.5 ± 1.1 minutes (P = 0.64). The duration of discomfort was shorter in the clown group (0.2 ± 0.6 minutes) than the control group(1.6 ± 2.0 minutes, P = 0.001). In the medical clown group, 94% of pediatricians reported that the medical clown improved their ability to perform a complete physical examination. A trend of less hospitalization in the medical clown group was also noticed (11.3% in the medical clown group vs. 18.3% in the control group, P = 0.1); however, further study is required to verify this observation.
CONCLUSIONS: Integration of a medical clown in physical examination improves the overall experience of the child and the caregivers and helps the pediatrician to perform a complete physical examination.

PMID: 29235739 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]; +34 new citations

Tue, 2019-05-21 08:55

34 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]

These pubmed results were generated on 2019/05/21

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Physical and Psychological Health Outcomes of Qigong Exercise in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Sat, 2019-05-18 08:48
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Physical and Psychological Health Outcomes of Qigong Exercise in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Am J Chin Med. 2019;47(2):301-322

Authors: Chang PS, Knobf T, Oh B, Funk M

Abstract
Physical limitations, depression and anxiety are prevalent among older adults. Mild to moderate exercise can promote physical and psychological health and reduce the risk of chronic diseases. Qigong, a type of Chinese traditional medicine exercise, has demonstrated beneficial effects on physical ability and mental health in adults with chronic conditions. The purpose of this review was to systematically assess the effects of Qigong exercise on physical and psychological health outcomes in older adults. A total of 1282 older adults aged 62 to 83 years with depressive symptoms, frailty or chronic medical illnesses were included in this review. The meta-analysis showed that Qigong exercise resulted in significantly improved physical ability compared with active control or usual care (standardized mean difference [SMD]  =  1.00 and 1.20, respectively). The pooled effects of studies with thrice weekly Qigong sessions had the greatest effect ( SMD=1.65 ) on physical ability in older adults. Lower quality studies demonstrated larger effect sizes than those of higher quality. Although Qigong exercise showed favorable effects on depression, balance and functioning, the overall effects did not reach statistical significance. No significant adverse events were reported. The findings suggest that the Qigong exercise may be an option for older adults to improve physical ability, functional ability, balance and to lessen depression and anxiety. However, the number of RCTs that enroll older adults is limited. More methodologically sound RCTs are needed to confirm the efficacy of Qigong exercise on physical and psychological health in older adults with chronic illnesses.

PMID: 30827152 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Non-pharmacological therapies and neuropsychological disorders in institutions].

Sat, 2019-05-18 08:48
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[Non-pharmacological therapies and neuropsychological disorders in institutions].

Soins Gerontol. 2018 Nov - Dec;23(134):32-35

Authors: Hédont S, Le Guillou A, Letty A, Denormandie P, Sanchez S

Abstract
Non-pharmacological therapies are now used in many nursing homes often with residents presenting a risk of behavioural disorders. They include music therapy, animal-assisted therapy, physical activity as well as other approaches such as light therapy or aromatherapy. It requires rigorous assessment, the permanent involvement and engagement of residents as well as the staff as part of a compassionate and participative approach.

PMID: 30449368 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Humour therapy, laughter and the intervention of clowns in gerontology].

Sat, 2019-05-18 08:48
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[Humour therapy, laughter and the intervention of clowns in gerontology].

Soins Gerontol. 2018 Mar - Apr;23(130):37-43

Authors: Lelièvre A, Gérard S, Hermabessière S, Martinez M, Péran B, Rolland Y

Abstract
Confronted with the growing incidence of age-related pathologies and the limits of so-called traditional medicine oriented towards the prescribing of medicines, non-pharmacological approaches have grown considerably in the geriatric community. A literature review focused on the therapeutic benefit of humour, laughter and the use of clowns on the physical and psychological health of elderly people.

PMID: 29530289 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Reply to: Comment on Tai Chi for Risk of Falls. A Meta-analysis.

Sat, 2019-05-18 08:48
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Reply to: Comment on Tai Chi for Risk of Falls. A Meta-analysis.

J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 12;65(12):2748-2749

Authors: Lomas-Vega R, Obrero-Gaitán E, Molina-Ortega FJ, Del-Pino-Casado R

PMID: 29080349 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Comment on Tai Chi for Risk of Falls. A meta-analysis.

Sat, 2019-05-18 08:48
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Comment on Tai Chi for Risk of Falls. A meta-analysis.

J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 12;65(12):2746-2748

Authors: Schoene D, Kiesswetter E, Lord SR

PMID: 29080347 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Disordered eating and obesity: associations between binge-eating disorder, night-eating syndrome, and weight-related comorbidities.

Sat, 2019-05-18 08:48
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Disordered eating and obesity: associations between binge-eating disorder, night-eating syndrome, and weight-related comorbidities.

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2018 01;1411(1):96-105

Authors: McCuen-Wurst C, Ruggieri M, Allison KC

Abstract
Binge-eating disorder (BED) and night-eating syndrome (NES) are two forms of disordered eating associated with overweight and obesity. While these disorders also occur in nonobese persons, they seem to be associated with weight gain over time and higher risk of diabetes and other metabolic dysfunction. BED and NES are also associated with higher risk of psychopathology, including mood, anxiety, and sleep problems, than those of similar weight status without disordered eating. Treatments are available, including cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), interpersonal psychotherapy, lisdexamfetamine, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for BED; and CBT, SSRIs, progressive muscle relaxation, and bright light therapy for NES.

PMID: 29044551 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The efficacy of a brief app-based mindfulness intervention on psychosocial outcomes in healthy adults: A pilot randomised controlled trial.

Fri, 2019-05-17 08:46
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The efficacy of a brief app-based mindfulness intervention on psychosocial outcomes in healthy adults: A pilot randomised controlled trial.

PLoS One. 2018;13(12):e0209482

Authors: Champion L, Economides M, Chandler C

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous evidence suggests that mindfulness training may improve aspects of psychosocial well-being. Whilst mindfulness is traditionally taught in person, consumers are increasingly turning to mindfulness-based smartphone apps as an alternative delivery medium for training. Despite this growing trend, few studies have explored whether mindfulness delivered via a smartphone app can enhance psychosocial well-being within the general public.
METHODS: The present pilot randomised controlled trial compared the impact of engaging with the self-guided mindfulness meditation (MM) app 'Headspace' (n = 38) for a period of 10 or 30 days, to a wait-list (WL) control (n = 36), using a cohort of adults from the general population. The Satisfaction with Life Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, and Wagnild Resilience Scale were administered online at baseline and after 10 and 30 days of the intervention.
RESULTS: Twelve participants (MM n = 9, WL n = 3) were lost to follow-up for unknown reasons. Relative to the WL control, the MM app positively impacted self-reported satisfaction with life, stress, and resilience at day 10, with further improvements emerging at day 30 (Cohen's d = 0.57, 1.42, 0.63 respectively). The rate of improvement was largest at the 10-day assessment point, dropping moderately by day 30. Participants that rated the MM app as easy to engage with experienced the largest self-reported benefits. Moreover, the MM app was able to protect against an unexpected increase in perceived stress that emerged in the control group.
CONCLUSIONS: This pilot randomised controlled trial shows that self-reported improvements in psychosocial outcomes can be achieved at low cost through short-term engagement with a mindfulness-based smartphone app, and should be followed up with more substantive studies.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN ISRCTN34618894.

PMID: 30596696 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Vertebral compression fractures associated with yoga: a case series.

Fri, 2019-05-17 08:46
Related Articles

Vertebral compression fractures associated with yoga: a case series.

Eur J Phys Rehabil Med. 2018 Dec;54(6):947-951

Authors: Sfeir JG, Drake MT, Sonawane VJ, Sinaki M

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The importance of exercise in skeletal health is increasingly recognized by both patients and providers. However, the safety of prescribed or recreational exercise in at-risk populations remains under-reported and under-publicized. Yoga has gained widespread popularity due to its physical and psychological benefits. When practiced in a population at increased fracture risk, however, some yoga poses may increase fracture risk, particularly at the spine, rather than increasing BMD as noted in recent popular press reports.
CASE REPORT: Nine subjects (8 women) with a median age of 66 years (range 53-87), developed vertebral compression fracture (VCF) one month to six years after initiating yoga-associated spinal flexion exercises (SFE). VCF presented with back pain and occurred in the thoracicspine (N.=6), lumbar-spine (N.=4) and cervical-spine (N.=1). Four patients had osteoporosis by BMD criteria prior to VCF and 2 had osteopenia (median T-score -2.35; range -3.3 to +2.0). Interestingly, all patients had their lowest T-scores at the spine. Three patients had a history of fragility fracture prior to the index VCF. While one patient had primary hyperparathyroidism and another was treated with high dose prednisone, no other risk factors for bone loss including medications or secondary osteoporosis causes were identified in the other patients.
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: This study identified patients in whom increased torsional and compressive mechanical loading pressures occurring during yoga SFE resulted in de novo VCF. Despite the need for selectivity in yoga poses in populations at increased fracture risk, both scientific and media reports continue to advertise yoga as a bone protective activity. Accordingly, yoga is misconceived as a 'onesize-fits-all' prescription. Instead, the appropriate selection of patients likely to benefit from yoga must be a cornerstone of fracture prevention.

PMID: 29687967 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Reply: On assessing neurofeedback effects: should double-blind replace neurophysiological mechanisms?

Fri, 2019-05-17 08:46
Related Articles

Reply: On assessing neurofeedback effects: should double-blind replace neurophysiological mechanisms?

Brain. 2017 10 01;140(10):e64

Authors: Schabus M

PMID: 28969379 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

On assessing neurofeedback effects: should double-blind replace neurophysiological mechanisms?

Fri, 2019-05-17 08:46
Related Articles

On assessing neurofeedback effects: should double-blind replace neurophysiological mechanisms?

Brain. 2017 10 01;140(10):e63

Authors: Fovet T, Micoulaud-Franchi JA, Vialatte FB, Lotte F, Daudet C, Batail JM, Mattout J, Wood G, Jardri R, Enriquez-Geppert S, Ros T

PMID: 28969378 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure: A new challenge for Cardiac Rehabilitation Community.

Thu, 2019-05-16 08:44
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Exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure: A new challenge for Cardiac Rehabilitation Community.

Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 2018 09 06;88(3):987

Authors: Giallauria F, Piccioli L, Vitale G, Sarullo FM

Abstract
Exercise training (ET) is strongly recommended in patients with chronic stable heart failure (HF). Moderate-intensity aerobic continuous ET is the best established training modality in HF patients. In the last decade, however, high-intensity interval exercise training (HIIT) has aroused considerable interest in cardiac rehabilitation community. In HF patients, HIIT exerts larger improvements in exercise  capacity compared to moderate-continuous ET. Since better functional capacity translates into symptoms relief and improvement in quality of life in patients with HF, this training modality is collecting growing interest and consensus, not revealing major safety issues. HIIT should not replace other training modalities in HF but should rather complement them. Inspiratory muscle training, another promising training modality in patients with HF, exerts beneficial effect on inspiratory muscle strength and inspiratory endurance, on exercise capacity and quality of life. In conclusion, taking into consideration the complecity of HF syndrome, combining and tailoring different ET modalities according to each patient's baseline clinical characteristics (i.e. exercise capacity, comorbidity, frailty status, personal needs, preferences and goals) seem the most wily approach for exercise prescription.

PMID: 30189716 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

A mind-brain-body dataset of MRI, EEG, cognition, emotion, and peripheral physiology in young and old adults.

Wed, 2019-05-15 08:42
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A mind-brain-body dataset of MRI, EEG, cognition, emotion, and peripheral physiology in young and old adults.

Sci Data. 2019 02 12;6:180308

Authors: Babayan A, Erbey M, Kumral D, Reinelt JD, Reiter AMF, Röbbig J, Schaare HL, Uhlig M, Anwander A, Bazin PL, Horstmann A, Lampe L, Nikulin VV, Okon-Singer H, Preusser S, Pampel A, Rohr CS, Sacher J, Thöne-Otto A, Trapp S, Nierhaus T, Altmann D, Arelin K, Blöchl M, Bongartz E, Breig P, Cesnaite E, Chen S, Cozatl R, Czerwonatis S, Dambrauskaite G, Dreyer M, Enders J, Engelhardt M, Fischer MM, Forschack N, Golchert J, Golz L, Guran CA, Hedrich S, Hentschel N, Hoffmann DI, Huntenburg JM, Jost R, Kosatschek A, Kunzendorf S, Lammers H, Lauckner ME, Mahjoory K, Kanaan AS, Mendes N, Menger R, Morino E, Näthe K, Neubauer J, Noyan H, Oligschläger S, Panczyszyn-Trzewik P, Poehlchen D, Putzke N, Roski S, Schaller MC, Schieferbein A, Schlaak B, Schmidt R, Gorgolewski KJ, Schmidt HM, Schrimpf A, Stasch S, Voss M, Wiedemann A, Margulies DS, Gaebler M, Villringer A

Abstract
We present a publicly available dataset of 227 healthy participants comprising a young (N=153, 25.1±3.1 years, range 20-35 years, 45 female) and an elderly group (N=74, 67.6±4.7 years, range 59-77 years, 37 female) acquired cross-sectionally in Leipzig, Germany, between 2013 and 2015 to study mind-body-emotion interactions. During a two-day assessment, participants completed MRI at 3 Tesla (resting-state fMRI, quantitative T1 (MP2RAGE), T2-weighted, FLAIR, SWI/QSM, DWI) and a 62-channel EEG experiment at rest. During task-free resting-state fMRI, cardiovascular measures (blood pressure, heart rate, pulse, respiration) were continuously acquired. Anthropometrics, blood samples, and urine drug tests were obtained. Psychiatric symptoms were identified with Standardized Clinical Interview for DSM IV (SCID-I), Hamilton Depression Scale, and Borderline Symptoms List. Psychological assessment comprised 6 cognitive tests as well as 21 questionnaires related to emotional behavior, personality traits and tendencies, eating behavior, and addictive behavior. We provide information on study design, methods, and details of the data. This dataset is part of the larger MPI Leipzig Mind-Brain-Body database.

PMID: 30747911 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Mind-Body Exercise (Wuqinxi) for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Wed, 2019-05-15 08:42
Related Articles

Mind-Body Exercise (Wuqinxi) for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 12 28;16(1):

Authors: Wang K, Liu S, Kong Z, Zhang Y, Liu J

Abstract
Objective: This study is the first meta-analysis investigating the rehabilitative effects of Wuqinxi for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: Five electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, CNKI, and Wanfang) from inception until early November 2018 were searched. All randomized controlled trials (RCT) using Wuqinxi as the main intervention component were included for meta-analysis. The pooled effect sizes (Standardized mean difference, SMD) were calculated to determine the magnitude of the Wuqinxi intervention effect. Moderator analysis was only conducted for total training time. Results: Overall results of the meta-analysis indicated that Wuqinxi exercise significantly improved exercise capability (SMD = 1.18, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.84, e < 0.001, I² = 84.97%), FEV1 (SMD = 0.44, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.77, e < 0.001, I² = 33.77%), FEV1% (SMD = 0.59, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.93, e < 0.001, I² = 63.79%), FEV1/FVC (SMD = 0.65, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.93, e = 0.006, I² = 44.32%) and CCQ (SMD = 1.23, 95% CI 0.31 to 2.14, e = 0.01, I² = 93.32%). Conclusions: With no occurrence of adverse event, clinicians could try to incorporate Wuqinxi exercise into their first-line rehabilitation regime for COPD patients.

PMID: 30597878 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effects of hypnosis on the relative parasympathetic tone assessed by ANI (Analgesia/Nociception Index) in healthy volunteers: a prospective observational study.

Wed, 2019-05-15 08:42
Related Articles

Effects of hypnosis on the relative parasympathetic tone assessed by ANI (Analgesia/Nociception Index) in healthy volunteers: a prospective observational study.

J Clin Monit Comput. 2018 Jun;32(3):487-492

Authors: Boselli E, Musellec H, Martin L, Bernard F, Fusco N, Guillou N, Hugot P, Paqueron X, Yven T, Virot C

Abstract
Hypnosis has shown an effect on the regulation of the autonomic nervous system by increasing parasympathetic activity. The Analgesia/Nociception Index (ANI) is derived from heart rate variability and represents the relative parasympathetic tone. We investigated the effects of hypnosis on ANI in healthy volunteers. Participants to the 2016 International Hypnosis congress, Saint Malo, France were recruited in this prospective observational study. After comfortable positioning of the subject in the sitting position (T0), the hypnotic trance was induced (T1) then conducted with suggestions of comfort (T2) before return to normal consciousness (T3). The ANI, heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) were recorded at the different time-points. Forty subjects were enrolled (31 women, 9 men). The mean ± SD ANI at T2 (84 ± 12) was significantly greater than at T0 (60 ± 10), T1 (62 ± 9) and T3 (59 ± 11). The median [25th-75th percentile] ANI values at T2 were significantly greater in women (90 [83-95]) than in men (74 [68-83]). There were no significant variations of HR during time. The median [25th-75th percentile] RR at T1 (16 [14-18] breaths/min) and T2 (14 [12-16] breaths/min) were significantly smaller than at T0 (18 [16-20] breaths/min) and T3 (18 [16-20] breaths/min). This study shows that hypnosis induces an increase in the relative parasympathetic tone assessed by ANI in healthy volunteers, with greater ANI values observed in women. These results suggest that ANI monitoring may provide an objective tool for the measurement of the intensity of the hypnotic process, although this should be confirmed by further studies.

PMID: 28825157 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Reporting of Protocol Rationale and Content Validity in Randomized Clinical Trials of T'ai Chi: A Systematic Evaluation.

Tue, 2019-05-14 08:40
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Reporting of Protocol Rationale and Content Validity in Randomized Clinical Trials of T'ai Chi: A Systematic Evaluation.

J Altern Complement Med. 2019 Apr;25(4):370-376

Authors: Litrownik D, Gilliam E, Berkowitz D, Yeh GY, Wayne PM

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mind-body exercise interventions are typically multimodal, complex, and pluralistic, and few have been developed with the goal of therapeutically targeting a specific medical population. It is thus important that clinical trials evaluating mind-body interventions provide some justification for the use of the specific protocol being evaluated.
OBJECTIVES: This article reports the results of a systematic review of the quality of reporting of protocol rationale and content validity for using a specific t'ai chi protocol in a randomized controlled trial (RCT).
METHODS: Electronic literature searches were conducted using PubMed/MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, and the Cochrane Library from inception through June 2015. Search terms were Tai Chi, Taiji, Tai Chi Chuan; searches were limited to English-language RCTs. Inclusion and exclusion of trials were reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The authors assessed the level of reporting with respect to t'ai chi protocol validation using a 5-point grading system based on whether (1) a specific protocol was mentioned, (2) rationale for the specific protocol was stated and supported, and (3) formal evaluation for content validity was conducted.
RESULTS: There was significant heterogeneity in the quality of reporting related to protocol rationale and content validity. A total of 171 publications were identified. Studies met between 0 and 4 validity criteria (of possible 5, more indicating better quality), with a mean of 2.52 (±SD 1.2) and median of 3. Twenty (12%) trials did not mention a specific t'ai chi protocol, 10 (6%) trials met 0 of 5 criteria, and 47 (31%) studies met 4 of 5 criteria. Formal validity assessments were employed in only one trial.
CONCLUSIONS: The poor quality of protocol rationale and content validity reporting limits our ability to accurately evaluate the evidence of t'ai chi as a therapeutic intervention. The development of formal guidelines for developing and reporting intervention validity for multimodal mind-body exercises like t'ai chi may improve the quality and interpretability of research.

PMID: 30835135 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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