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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]
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Facilitating Neurofeedback in Children with Autism and Intellectual Impairments Using TAGteach.

Tue, 2019-05-28 15:14
Related Articles

Facilitating Neurofeedback in Children with Autism and Intellectual Impairments Using TAGteach.

J Autism Dev Disord. 2018 06;48(6):2090-2100

Authors: LaMarca K, Gevirtz R, Lincoln AJ, Pineda JA

Abstract
Individuals with autism and intellectual impairments tend to be excluded from research due to their difficulties with methodological compliance. This study focuses on using Teaching with Acoustic Guidance-TAGteach-to behaviorally prepare children with autism and a IQ ≤ 80 to participate in a study on neurofeedback training (NFT). Seven children (ages 6-8) learned the prerequisite skills identified in a task analysis in an average of 5 h of TAGteach training, indicating that this is a feasible method of preparing intellectually-impaired children with autism to participate in NFT and task-dependent electroencephalography measures. TAGteach may thus have the potential to augment this population's ability to participate in less accessible treatments and behavioral neuroscientific studies.

PMID: 29380270 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Physical Activity-Based Interventions Using Electronic Feedback May Be Ineffective in Reducing Pain and Disability in Patients With Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis.

Tue, 2019-05-28 15:14
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Physical Activity-Based Interventions Using Electronic Feedback May Be Ineffective in Reducing Pain and Disability in Patients With Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2018 09;99(9):1900-1912

Authors: Oliveira CB, Franco MR, Maher CG, Ferreira PH, Morelhão PK, Damato TM, Gobbi C, Pinto RZ

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of physical activity-based interventions using electronic feedback in reducing pain and disability compared to minimal or no interventions in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.
DATA SOURCES: The following electronic databases were searched: EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and main clinical trial registers.
STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials investigating the effect of physical activity interventions using electronic feedback (eg, physical activity monitors) on pain and disability compared to minimal or no interventions in adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain were considered eligible.
DATA EXTRACTION: Pooled effects were calculated using the standardized mean difference (SMD), and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system was used to assess the overall quality of the evidence.
DATA SYNTHESIS: Four published randomized controlled trials and 4 registered unpublished randomized controlled trials were included. At short-term follow-up, pooled estimations showed no significant differences in pain (2 trials: n=116; SMD=-.50; 95% confidence interval, -1.91 to 0.91) and disability (2 trials: n=116; SMD=-.81; 95% confidence interval, -2.34 to 0.73) between physical activity-based interventions and minimal interventions. Similarly, nonsignificant results were found at intermediate-term follow-up. According to Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation, the overall quality of the evidence was considered to be of low quality.
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that physical activity-based interventions using electronic feedback may be ineffective in reducing pain and disability compared to minimal interventions in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Clinicians should be cautious when implementing this intervention in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

PMID: 29122581 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Therapeutic clowning in hospital settings: more than a play-fool proposal.

Tue, 2019-05-28 15:14
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Therapeutic clowning in hospital settings: more than a play-fool proposal.

Arch Dis Child. 2017 07;102(7):597-598

Authors: Finlay F, Baverstock A, Lenton S

PMID: 28465302 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Characteristics of adult smokers presenting to a mind-body medicine clinic.

Tue, 2019-05-28 15:14
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Characteristics of adult smokers presenting to a mind-body medicine clinic.

J Health Psychol. 2018 05;23(6):860-870

Authors: Luberto CM, Chad-Friedman E, Dossett ML, Perez GK, Park ER

Abstract
Mind-body interventions can improve vulnerabilities that underlie smoking behavior. The characteristics of smokers who use mind-body medicine have not been explored, preventing the development of targeted interventions. Patients ( N = 593) presenting to a mind-body medicine clinic completed self-report measures. Patients were 67 percent never smokers, 27 percent former smokers, and 6 percent current smokers. Current smokers were younger; more likely to be single, unemployed, or on disability; and report greater depression symptoms, greater pain, and lower social support ( ps < .05).Current smokers who use mind-body medicine have unique psychosocial needs that should be targeted in mind-body smoking cessation interventions.

PMID: 27688301 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[The impact of conversational hypnosis on the pre- and postoperative anxiety of patients in gynecological surgery versus ordinary practice: A comparative study].

Fri, 2019-05-24 06:01
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[The impact of conversational hypnosis on the pre- and postoperative anxiety of patients in gynecological surgery versus ordinary practice: A comparative study].

Rech Soins Infirm. 2018 Dec;(135):83-90

Authors: Sourzac J, Berger V, Conri V

Abstract
Hysterectomies are often linked to benign pathologies, but they are nevertheless the cause of anxiety and lead to significant physiological and psychological changes for these women. The uterus, as a symbol of femininity for women, has a unique meaning in relation to its reproductive function and its role in sexuality. Given this fact, does conversational hypnosis-used when a patient arrives at the hospital-have an impact on the pre- and postoperative anxiety of patients hospitalized for gynecological surgery in the form of a hysterectomy? To answer this question, a pilot study of comparative monocentric feasibility was performed with two parallel groups of 10 patients in 2014. The first group was received using ordinary practices, while the second group was received using techniques of conversational hypnosis. The main objective of this study was to estimate the effect of the use of conversational hypnosis upon reception compared to the use of the ordinary care protocol on perioperative anxiety upon reception, measured on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) of anxiety for patients undergoing a hysterectomy associated with a benign pathology.The results show that patients who received the techniques of conversational hypnosis upon reception to the hospital had clearly lower pre- and postoperative anxiety.The results of this pilot feasibility study made it possible to perform follow-up research to confirm these first results in the context of a call for projects by SIRIC BRIO (Call for projects 2016: Site de Recherche Intégrée en Cancérologie - Bordeaux Recherche Intégrée en Oncologie). This research is currently underway to examine the impact of a formal preoperative hypnosis session on the perioperative anxiety of patients hospitalized for hysterectomy related to pelvic gynecologic cancer.

PMID: 30767472 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Exploring the feasibility of a mild and short 4-week combined upper limb and breathing exercise program as a possible home base program to decrease fatigue and improve quality of life in ambulatory and non-ambulatory multiple sclerosis individuals.

Fri, 2019-05-24 06:01
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Exploring the feasibility of a mild and short 4-week combined upper limb and breathing exercise program as a possible home base program to decrease fatigue and improve quality of life in ambulatory and non-ambulatory multiple sclerosis individuals.

Neurol Sci. 2019 Apr;40(4):733-743

Authors: Grubić Kezele T, Babić M, Štimac D

Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the feasibility of a combined upper limb and breathing exercise for a home-based program and to explore its effect on primary fatigue and quality of life in ambulatory and non-ambulatory individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) in a short time.
METHOD: Nineteen individuals with MS were assigned into semi-controlled pre-post feasibility study based on Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) status and divided into two groups: exercise (five ambulatory, five non-ambulatory; EDSS 1.0-8.0) and related control with no exercise (four ambulatory, five non-ambulatory; EDSS 1.0-7.5). Exercise group performed combined upper limb and breathing exercise in a controlled group (2 days/week, 60 min/session) accompanied by independent home exercise (3 days/week, ≥ 20 min/session). Participants underwent measures of fatigue impact (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) and quality of life (RAND Medical outcomes study 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36)) before and after a 4-week period.
RESULTS: The MFIS (physical, psychosocial, total) showed statistically significant group-by-time interaction in ambulatory (p = 0.033, d = 1.60; p = 0.039, d = 1.59; p = 0.033, d = 1.62) and non-ambulatory individuals (p = 0.009, d = 2.42; p = 0.018, d = 1.96; p = 0.0008, d = 3.92). Physical functioning (SF-36) showed statistically significant group-by-time interaction in ambulatory (p = 0.014, d = 2.14) but no significance in non-ambulatory (p = 0.368, d = 0.68) individuals. Despite the absent statistical significance, there were large intervention effects on MFIS cognitive scores for ambulatory (d = 1.28) and non-ambulatory (d = 1.47), and on other SF-36 scores for ambulatory (general health: d = 1.76 and pain: d = 1.02) and non-ambulatory (physical limitation: d = 1.03 and emotional well-being: d = 0.94) individuals.
CONCLUSION: Our 4-week program reduced some aspects of fatigue and improved some aspects of quality of life in a small group of ambulatory and non-ambulatory individuals with MS. Good feasibility and significant positive changes from baseline warrant further exploratory work.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: Name of the registry: The Impact of Exercise Training on Living Quality in Multiple Sclerosis. Registration: The study was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov on July 14, 2017. First participant enrollment: August 28, 2017. URL: 602-01/17-01-147; Trial registration ID: NTC03222596.

PMID: 30659416 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[An evaluation of hypnosis practices in palliative care.]

Fri, 2019-05-24 06:01
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[An evaluation of hypnosis practices in palliative care.]

Rech Soins Infirm. 2018 Jun;(133):85-91

Authors: Quintini D, Fichaux M, Surdej F, Espanet N, Salas S

Abstract
There are very few studies in existence today that look at the value of hypnosis in palliative care.The aim of our study was to measure the impact of hypnosis on managing symptoms in palliative care. This quantitative retrospective monocentric observational study evaluated pain and patient satisfaction using monitoring and evaluation sheets, which included a rating scale before and after hypnosis sessions in a palliative care unit.For two years, thirty-seven patients participated in hypnosis sessions mostly for pain (41%) and anxiety (27%). 51% reported a decrease in symptoms, with 35% even reporting that the intensity of their symptoms vanished. Most of the patients were satisfied with the approach and at the end of the study some of them were able to recreate its effects by using self-hypnosis.Despite the small sample, the results confirm those found in the few palliative studies that do exist, particularly relating to the improvement of symptoms such as pain, anxiety, nausea, and respiratory disorders.

PMID: 30066511 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Electrodermal reactivity to emotional stimuli in healthy subjects and patients with disorders of consciousness.

Fri, 2019-05-24 06:01
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Electrodermal reactivity to emotional stimuli in healthy subjects and patients with disorders of consciousness.

Ann Phys Rehabil Med. 2018 Nov;61(6):401-406

Authors: Luauté J, Dubois A, Heine L, Guironnet C, Juliat A, Gaveau V, Tillmann B, Perrin F

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: After a coma, one major challenge is the detection of awareness in patients with disorders of consciousness. In some patients, the only manifestation indicative of awareness is an appropriate emotional response. Preferred music is a powerful medium to elicit emotions and autobiographical memory. Furthermore, music has been shown to improve cognitive functions both in healthy subjects and patients with neurological impairment. We hypothesized that signs of awareness could be enhanced in some patients with disorders of consciousness under appropriate emotional stimulation such as preferred music and also probably preferred odors.
METHODS: To investigate an objective, easily recordable marker of emotions at the patients' bedside, electrodermal activity (skin conductance level, SCL) was assessed with stimulations in auditory and olfactory modalities, notably with preferred music, neutral sound, preferred odors, and neutral odors. The study was conducted in 11 patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) and 7 healthy participants.
RESULTS: In healthy subjects, the mean amplitude of the SCL was increased during exposure to preferred music as compared to neutral sounds (respectively: 0.00037±0.0004 vs. - 0.00004±0.00019μS). No significant difference between conditions was detected in patients.
CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that electrodermal activity could be a useful marker of emotions induced by music in healthy controls. However, it failed to show any significant difference between conditions in patients with DOC.

PMID: 29782953 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effectiveness of complex regional pain syndrome treatment: A systematic review.

Fri, 2019-05-24 06:01
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Effectiveness of complex regional pain syndrome treatment: A systematic review.

Neurol Neurochir Pol. 2018 May - Jun;52(3):326-333

Authors: Żyluk A, Puchalski P

Abstract
Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a descriptive term for a complex of symptoms and signs typically occurring following trauma of the extremity. Typical symptomatology includes severe pain, swelling, vasomotor instability and functional impairment of the affected limb. At present there is no one, effective method of treatment of the condition. A large number of treatments have been investigated but major multicentre randomized controlled trials are lacking. This study presents the results of a systematic review of the evidence on effectiveness of treatment methods in CRPS. It is a follow-up to earlier reviews of randomized controlled trials on CRPS treatment published between 1966 and 2016.
RESULTS: The review of randomized controlled trials showed that only bisphosphonates were found to give uniformly positive effects, statistically significantly better than placebo. Improvement has been reported with topical dimethyl sulfoxide, systemic steroids, spinal cord stimulation and graded motor imagery/mirror therapy programmes. The available evidence does not support the use of other treatments in CRPS, however they are frequently used in clinical practice.
CONCLUSION: Available evidence, although numerous, does not necessarily reflect what is truly effective and what is sham in the management of CRPS.

PMID: 29559178 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Evidence-based psychotherapy of addictive disorders].

Fri, 2019-05-24 06:01
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[Evidence-based psychotherapy of addictive disorders].

Nervenarzt. 2018 Mar;89(3):283-289

Authors: Block I, Loeber S

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Addictive disorders form the group of the most common mental disorders. A wide range of psychotherapeutic treatment interventions exists; however, the proportion of patients receiving evidence-based interventions or psychotherapeutic treatment in outpatient care is very low.
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present review was a systematic reassessment of the empirical evidence for the efficacy of the different forms of psychotherapeutic treatment, identification of new effective interventions and derivation of recommendations for treatment practitioners.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: A comprehensive literature search in a multistage method in the relevant national and international data banks was conducted. Subsequent analysis of topical guidelines, systematic reviews and original studies about addictions and therapy was performed.
RESULTS: A total of 3 topical national guidelines, 2 reviews and 16 original studies could be identified. In particular, cognitive behavioral therapy, behavioral interventions and motivational interventions could be identified as evidence-based interventions for the treatment of addictive disorders. Hypnotherapy can be recommended alternatively for patients dependent on tobacco. Also interesting for practitioners could be new treatment methods, such as neurocognitive training and mindfulness-based interventions.
CONCLUSION: At present, although of high quality, results from existing studies are sometimes inconsistent or are numerically insufficient with respect to special treatment options. Future studies are warranted with respect to different substance use disorders and further patient groups.

PMID: 29368015 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Does a hypnosis session reduce the required propofol dose during closed-loop anaesthesia induction?: A randomised controlled trial.

Fri, 2019-05-24 06:01
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Does a hypnosis session reduce the required propofol dose during closed-loop anaesthesia induction?: A randomised controlled trial.

Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2018 09;35(9):675-681

Authors: Bataille A, Guirimand A, Szekely B, Michel-Cherqui M, Dumans V, Liu N, Chazot T, Fischler M, Le Guen M

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hypnosis has a positive effect on peri-operative anxiety and pain.
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a formal deep hypnosis session on the consumption of propofol for anaesthetic induction using automated administration of propofol guided by the bispectral index (BIS) in a closed loop.
DESIGN: A 1 : 1 randomised, usual-care-controlled, single-centre trial.
SETTING: Tertiary care centre in France from April 2014 to December 2015.
PATIENTS: Female adult patients scheduled for outpatient gynaecological surgery under general anaesthesia.
INTERVENTION: Before surgery, patients were randomised to receive either a deep hypnosis session or routine care. Anaesthetic induction was performed automatically by propofol without opioids and was assisted by the BIS in a closed loop.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary endpoint was the propofol dose required for anaesthesia induction, defined as a BIS less than 60 for at least 30 s.
RESULTS: Data for 31 patients in the hypnosis group and 35 in the control group were analysed. There was no evidence of a difference in the mean required propofol dose for anaesthetic induction between the hypnosis and the control groups (2.06 mg kg (95% confidence interval [1.68 to 2.43]) versus 1.79 mg kg (95% CI [1.54 to 2.03]), P = 0.25, respectively).
CONCLUSION: The current study, which was designed to determine the effect of a deep hypnosis session on anaesthesia induction using an automated tool for propofol administration, failed to detect a difference in the required dose of propofol.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02249364.

PMID: 29210845 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Pushing, pulling and manoeuvring an industrial cart: a psychophysiological study.

Fri, 2019-05-24 06:01
Related Articles

Pushing, pulling and manoeuvring an industrial cart: a psychophysiological study.

Int J Occup Saf Ergon. 2019 Jun;25(2):296-304

Authors: Giagloglou E, Radenkovic M, Brankovic S, Antoniou P, Zivanovic-Macuzic I

Abstract
One of the most frequent manual occupational tasks involves the pushing and pulling of a cart. Although several studies have associated health risks with pushing and pulling, the effects are not clear since occupational tasks have social, cognitive and physical components. The present work investigates a real case of a pushing and pulling occupational task from a manufacturing company. The study initially characterizes the case in accordance with Standard No. ISO 11228-2:2007 as low risk. An experiment with 14 individuals during three modalities of pushing and pulling was performed in order to further investigate the task with the application of electrophysiology. At the end, a simple questionnaire was given. The results show electrophysiological differences among the three modalities of pushing and pulling, with a major difference between action with no load and fully loaded with a full range of motions on the cart to handle.

PMID: 28849989 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effects of a Progressive Stabilization Exercise Program Using Respiratory Resistance for Patients with Lumbar Instability: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Thu, 2019-05-23 09:00
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Effects of a Progressive Stabilization Exercise Program Using Respiratory Resistance for Patients with Lumbar Instability: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Med Sci Monit. 2019 Mar 07;25:1740-1748

Authors: Park SH, Lee MM

Abstract
BACKGROUND This study investigated the effects of progressive stabilization exercise program carried out with respiratory resistance in patients with lumbar instability. MATERIAL AND METHODS Forty-three patients with lumbar instability were randomly assigned to experimental (n=20) and control groups (n=23). The experimental group performed progressive lumbar stabilization exercises along with respiratory resistance, and the control group only performed progressive lumbar stabilization exercises, for 40 min per session, 3 sessions a week, for 4 weeks. Numeric rating scale (NRS), Korean-Oswestry disability index (K-ODI), static balance ability, Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), and pulmonary function test (PFT) were performed before and after the intervention program for comparison. RESULTS The 2 groups showed significant differences in NRS, K-ODI, balance ability, and FABQ after the interventions (p<0.05), but greater improvements were shown by the experimental group in balance ability and FABQ values. PFT results in the experimental group showed a significant increase (p<0.05) in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV). The experimental group showed a greater improvement (p<0.05) in FVC and MVV compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS Progressive stabilization exercise program with respiratory resistance is an effective method with clinical significance in pain reduction, psychosocial stability, and enhancement of motor and respiratory functions.

PMID: 30842392 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Using EEG-based brain computer interface and neurofeedback targeting sensorimotor rhythms to improve motor skills: Theoretical background, applications and prospects.

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:57
Related Articles

Using EEG-based brain computer interface and neurofeedback targeting sensorimotor rhythms to improve motor skills: Theoretical background, applications and prospects.

Neurophysiol Clin. 2019 Apr;49(2):125-136

Authors: Jeunet C, Glize B, McGonigal A, Batail JM, Micoulaud-Franchi JA

Abstract
Many Brain Computer Interface (BCI) and neurofeedback studies have investigated the impact of sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) self-regulation training procedures on motor skills enhancement in healthy subjects and patients with motor disabilities. This critical review aims first to introduce the different definitions of SMR EEG target in BCI/Neurofeedback studies and to summarize the background from neurophysiological and neuroplasticity studies that led to SMR being considered as reliable and valid EEG targets to improve motor skills through BCI/neurofeedback procedures. The second objective of this review is to introduce the main findings regarding SMR BCI/neurofeedback in healthy subjects. Third, the main findings regarding BCI/neurofeedback efficiency in patients with hypokinetic activities (in particular, motor deficit following stroke) as well as in patients with hyperkinetic activities (in particular, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, ADHD) will be introduced. Due to a range of limitations, a clear association between SMR BCI/neurofeedback training and enhanced motor skills has yet to be established. However, SMR BCI/neurofeedback appears promising, and highlights many important challenges for clinical neurophysiology with regards to therapeutic approaches using BCI/neurofeedback.

PMID: 30414824 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Chan-Chuang Qigong Improves Exercise Capacity, Depression, and Quality of Life in Patients With Heart Failure].

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:57
Related Articles

[Chan-Chuang Qigong Improves Exercise Capacity, Depression, and Quality of Life in Patients With Heart Failure].

Hu Li Za Zhi. 2018 Oct;65(5):34-44

Authors: Cheng JH, Wang YJ, Chou SS, Yeh ML

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Evidence-based research has shown the effects of traditional Chinese exercise on exercise capacity, depression, and quality of life in patients with cardiovascular disease. However, the effects of Chan-Chuang qigong on the physical and psychological status and on the quality of life of these patients are unknown.
PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of Chan-Chuang qigong on exercise capacity, depression, and quality of life in patients with heart failure.
METHODS: A randomized controlled study with repeated measures was conducted. One hundred participants with heart failure were recruited from a teaching medical center in Taiwan. Permuted block randomization was used to randomly assign the participants to either the Chan-Chuang qigong group, which received Chan-Chuang qigong intervention for three-months, or the control group. The outcome variables included six-minute walk distance, depression, and quality of life.
RESULTS: Generalized estimating equation analyses showed that the Chan-Chuang qigong group achieved significantly greater improvements than the control group in terms of six-minute walk distance (p = .001, p < .001, p < .001, respectively) and quality of life (p = .016, p < .001, p < .001, respectively) at 2, 4, and 12 weeks after the intervention and depression at 12 weeks after the intervention (p = .016).
CONCLUSIONS / IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The results of this study indicate that Chan-Chuang qigong improves exercise capacity, depression, and quality of life in patients with heart failure without imposing harmful side effects.

PMID: 30276771 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

RAPID INDUCTION ANALGESIA FOR CAPSAICIN-INDUCED PAIN IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:57
Related Articles

RAPID INDUCTION ANALGESIA FOR CAPSAICIN-INDUCED PAIN IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2018 Oct-Dec;66(4):428-450

Authors: James K, Drummond PD

Abstract
The effect of rapid-induction analgesia (RIA) hypnosis on capsaicin-induced pain was tested in 60 healthy volunteers allocated randomly to 1 of 3 conditions: listening to an RIA recording several times before and then during the session, only the in-session RIA intervention, or listening to relaxing music (the control condition). Participants who had listened to the RIA recording beforehand were significantly more relaxed than controls when differences between the groups were identified for pain intensity. These findings suggest that relaxation induced by RIA recordings can alleviate the affective component of pain. In addition, benefits of RIA may strengthen with practice.

PMID: 30152737 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The Roots and Evolution of Ego-State Theory and Therapy.

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:57
Related Articles

The Roots and Evolution of Ego-State Theory and Therapy.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2018 Oct-Dec;66(4):353-370

Authors: Abramowitz EG, Torem MS

Abstract
The purpose of this article is to elucidate the origins of ego-state theory and therapy and to discuss the concept of human personality as a structure comprising numerous ego states. The historical roots of ego-state theory and therapy are reviewed. Also, the evolution of ego-state therapy from classic hypnotherapy to modern methods is identified. The article notes that these methods of ego-state therapy have been described by different authors and under different names. It is suggested that core concepts related to ego-state theory and therapy of guided hypnotic dissociation may underlie the core of clinical effectiveness in many contemporary psychotherapeutic methods.

PMID: 30152736 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

CHANGES IN OXYTOCIN AND CORTISOL IN ACTIVE-ALERT HYPNOSIS: Hormonal Changes Benefiting Low Hypnotizable Participants.

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:57
Related Articles

CHANGES IN OXYTOCIN AND CORTISOL IN ACTIVE-ALERT HYPNOSIS: Hormonal Changes Benefiting Low Hypnotizable Participants.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2018 Oct-Dec;66(4):404-427

Authors: Kasos E, Kasos K, Pusztai F, Polyák Á, Kovács KJ, Varga K

Abstract
It is increasingly clear that oxytocin and cortisol play an intricate role in the regulation of behavior and emotions impacting health, relationships, and well-being. Their long-term, cross-generational effect makes them an important focus of the present study. This exploratory research examined changes in oxytocin and cortisol levels and their correlations with different phenomenological measures in both hypnotist and subject during active-alert hypnosis. The level of oxytocin increased whereas the level of cortisol decreased in the hypnotist. When comparing the oxytocin changes of subjects with their hypnotizability, those with low hypnotizability scores experienced an increase in oxytocin, and those with medium and high hypnotizability scores showed no change or decrease. This could explain why clients' hypnotizability is not considered an important factor during hypnotherapy.

PMID: 30152735 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effects of a Brief Hypnosis Relaxation Induction on Subjective Psychological States, Cardiac Vagal Activity, and Breathing Frequency.

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:57
Related Articles

Effects of a Brief Hypnosis Relaxation Induction on Subjective Psychological States, Cardiac Vagal Activity, and Breathing Frequency.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2018 Oct-Dec;66(4):386-403

Authors: Laborde S, Heuer S, Mosley E

Abstract
This study investigated the effects of a brief hypnosis including relaxation suggestions on physiological markers of relaxation, cardiac vagal activity, and breathing frequency. Forty participants were tested in a within-subjects design. Participants listened to a recorded hypnosis session and to a nonhypnotic recording. No differences were found regarding cardiac vagal activity. Participants breathed significantly faster during the audio conditions (hypnosis and nonhypnotic recording) in comparison to resting measures. After hypnosis, subjective arousal was significantly lower and emotional valence was significantly more positive than after the nonhypnotic recording condition. The relaxing effects of hypnosis that includes relaxation suggestions appear to be located at the subjective level but not at the peripheral physiological level.

PMID: 30152734 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Hypnosis for the Management of Headache.

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:57
Related Articles

Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Hypnosis for the Management of Headache.

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2018 Oct-Dec;66(4):343-352

Authors: Flynn N

Abstract
Migraine is a complex neurological condition that causes a range of symptoms, the most common of which is a severe headache. The aim of this systematic review of the literature is to determine the efficacy of hypnosis in the treatment of migraine. A systematic search of 4 scientific databases was conducted using the primary search terms migraine, headache, hypnosis, and hypnotherapy. A total of 8 studies were identified that examined hypnotic techniques either alone or in combination with other nonpharmaceutical techniques, such as visual imagery, relaxation, and pain-displacement techniques. This study demonstrates that hypnotherapy and relaxation techniques are effective in reducing short- and long-term headache activity in migraine sufferers.

PMID: 30152733 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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