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Tai Chi for improving balance and reducing falls: A protocol of systematic review and meta-analysis.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Tai Chi for improving balance and reducing falls: A protocol of systematic review and meta-analysis.

Medicine (Baltimore). 2019 Apr;98(17):e15225

Authors: Zhong D, Xiao Q, He M, Li Y, Ye J, Zheng H, Xia L, Zhang C, Liang F, Li J, Jin R

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: To investigate the effectiveness and safety of Tai Chi for improving balance and reducing falls on people.
METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The following databases will be searched: China Biology Medicine (CBM), China National Knowledge infrastructure (CNKI), Wan Fang Data, the Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database (VIP), Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library from inception to March 2019. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) utilized Tai Chi to improve balance ability and reduce falls will be included. Primary outcomes are the fall-related indicators, including the number of falls, fall rate, and other fall-related outcomes. Additional outcomes include the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), standing-walk test, single-legged time, or other balance-related outcomes. Study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment will be performed independently by 2 reviewers. Assessment of risk of bias and data synthesis will be performed using Review Manager V5.3 software.
ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The findings of this systematic review will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publication or conference presentations.Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42019127810.

PMID: 31027069 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Yoga as part of a package of care versus non-standard care for schizophrenia.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Yoga as part of a package of care versus non-standard care for schizophrenia.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2019 04 16;4:CD012807

Authors: Broderick J, Vancampfort D

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Yoga is an ancient body-mind practice which originated in India and is popular in the Western world as a form of relaxation and exercise. It has been of interest for people with schizophrenia to determine the efficacy of yoga delivered as a package of care versus non-standard care.
OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of yoga as part of a package of care versus non-standard care for schizophrenia.
SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (latest 15 May 2018) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, BIOSS, AMED, PsychINFO, and registries of clinical trials. We searched the references of all included studies. There are no language, date, document type, or publication status limitations for inclusion of records in the register.
SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including people with schizophrenia comparing yoga as part of a package of care with non-standard care.
DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: There were no data to analyse as no studies met the inclusion criteria.
MAIN RESULTS: The searches identified 30 studies that could be relevant to this review. After careful inspection, 29 were excluded and one is awaiting classification. No data were available for analyses.
AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: In view of the lack of evidence from RCTs, it is currently not possible for us to comment on the use of yoga as part of a package of care versus non-standard care.

PMID: 30990224 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The role of wearables in spinal posture analysis: a systematic review.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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The role of wearables in spinal posture analysis: a systematic review.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 Feb 08;20(1):55

Authors: Simpson L, Maharaj MM, Mobbs RJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Wearables consist of numerous technologies that are worn on the body and measure parameters such as step count, distance travelled, heart rate and sleep quantity. Recently, various wearable systems have been designed capable of detecting spinal posture and providing live biofeedback when poor posture is sustained. It is hypothesised that long-term use of these wearables may improve spinal posture.
RESEARCH QUESTIONS: To (1) examine the capabilities of current devices assessing spine posture, (2) to identify studies implementing such devices in the clinical setting and (3) comment on the clinical practicality of integration of such devices into routine care where appropriate.
METHODS: A comprehensive systematic review was conducted in adherence to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Guidelines (PRISMA) across the following databases: PubMed; MEDLINE; EMBASE; Cochrane; and Scopus. Articles related to wearables systems able to measure spinal posture were selected amongst all published studies dated from 1980 onwards. Extracted data was collected as per a predetermined checklist including device types, study objectives, findings and limitations.
RESULTS: A total of 37 articles were extensively reviewed and analysed in the final review. The proposed wearables most commonly used Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) as the underlying technology. Wearables measuring spinal posture have been proposed to be used in the following settings: post-operative rehabilitation; treatment of musculoskeletal disorders; diagnosis of pathological spinal posture; monitoring of progression of Parkinson's Disease; detection of falls; workplace occupational health and safety; comparison of interventions.
CONCLUSIONS: This is the first and only study to specifically review wearable devices that monitor spinal posture. Our findings suggest that currently available devices are capable of assessing spinal posture with good accuracy in the clinical setting. However, further validation regarding the long-term use of these technologies and improvements regarding practicality is required for commercialisation.

PMID: 30736775 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Progressive Respiratory Muscle Training for Improving Trunk Stability in Chronic Stroke Survivors: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Progressive Respiratory Muscle Training for Improving Trunk Stability in Chronic Stroke Survivors: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2019 May;28(5):1200-1211

Authors: Lee K, Park D, Lee G

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Stroke weakens the respiratory muscles, which in turn may influence the trunk stability; it is unclear whether the progressive respiratory muscle training (RMT) is effective in improving the trunk stability. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of progressive RMT with trunk stabilization exercise (TSE) on respiratory muscles thickness, respiratory muscle functions, and trunk stability in chronic stroke survivors.
METHODS: This is a pilot randomized controlled trial. Chronic stroke survivors (n = 33) who were able to sit independently participated in the tstudy. The participants were allocated into the RMP with TSE group or the TSE group. The respiratory muscle thickness during resting and contraction were measured. Maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and forceful expiratory volume at 1 sec (FEV1) for forced expiratory muscle function and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), peak inspiratory flow (PIF), and vital capacity (VC) for inspiratory muscle function were examined. Trunk stability was estimated by maximal velocity and path length of the center of pressure (COP) by using a balance board with sitting posture.
RESULTS: The respiratory muscle thickness was significantly increased on the affected side in the RMT group than in the TSE group. The MEP, PEF, MIP, and PIF were significantly increased in the RMT group than in the TSE group; however, FEV1 and VC showed no significant differences between the 2 groups. Trunk stability for the maximal velocity of COP of extension and affected side bending was significantly increased in the RMT group than in the TSE group. In addition, the maximal path length of COP of flexion, extension, affected/less affected side bending was significantly increased in the RMT group than in the TSE group.
CONCLUSIONS: RMT combined with TSE can be suggested as an effective method to improve the respiratory muscle thickness, respiratory muscle functions, and trunk stability in chronic stroke survivors as opposed to TSE only.

PMID: 30712955 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Comparison of effects between SMR/delta-ratio and beta1/theta-ratio neurofeedback training for older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Comparison of effects between SMR/delta-ratio and beta1/theta-ratio neurofeedback training for older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Trials. 2019 Jan 29;20(1):88

Authors: Marlats F, Djabelkhir-Jemmi L, Azabou E, Boubaya M, Pouwels S, Rigaud AS

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) are at high risk of progressing to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Slowing down the effect of dementia by enhancing brain plasticity represents one of the most prominent challenges. Neurofeedback (NF) has shown promising results in improving working memory but has never been evaluated in people with MCI. We aim to examine whether NF training can decrease cognitive disorders, targeting memory, attention functions and brain electrical activity in elderly patients with MCI.
METHODS: In this single-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) protocol, we will investigate the effects of two NF training protocols on cognitive performances and on brain electrical activity. Sixty MCI patients will be assigned either to an intervention program or to psycho-pedagogical care as a control condition. Participants in the intervention group will attend 30 sessions of sensorimotor/delta-ratio NF training or beta1/theta-ratio NF training. Neuropsychological assessment, questionnaires and electroencephalography (EEG) assessment parameters will be used as dependent variables in three periods: at baseline (T0), immediately after the last NF training session at 4 months (T1) and at 3-month follow-up (T2). The primary outcome will be the change in attention measured with the Trail Making Test B. Secondary outcome will be the changes in cognitive performance and in EEG activities.
DISCUSSION: If the results of our study show improvement in cognitive performances of older adults with MCI, this non-invasive, low-cost technique may deserve better consideration as a therapeutic intervention to delay cognitive decline and dementia. Consequently, research in NF will need to review and develop the rigor of its application in gerontology.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT03526692 . Registered on 16 May 2018.

PMID: 30696475 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[The DISC tool improves communication and results in pulmonary rehabilitation].

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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[The DISC tool improves communication and results in pulmonary rehabilitation].

Rev Mal Respir. 2019 Jan;36(1):39-48

Authors: Grosbois JM, Valentin ML, Valentin V, Wallaert B, Le Rouzic O

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Competence in personal relationships is essential for a caregiver, especially in pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Considering the behavioral profile of patients might help to optimize their management and the results of PR.
METHODS: We evaluated eight hundred and thirty-two consecutive patients with chronic respiratory disease who received eight weeks of home-based PR. Their exercise tolerance (six-minute stepper test, 6MST), mood (HAD), and quality of life (VSRQ, MRF28) were evaluated at the beginning and end of PR. For six hundred and ninety patients, a behavioral approach was implemented at the beginning of PR by using the DISC tool to identify four behavioral profiles: dominance, influence, steadiness, conscientiousness. The remaining 142 patients served as the control group.
RESULTS: Subjectively, the therapeutic alliance was more easily established with the behavioral approach. Compared with the control group, patients with the "steadiness" profile were younger (60.7±12 years) and mostly female (52.8%), whereas patients with the "conscientiousness" profile were older (67.5±10.6 years) and mostly male (85.5%). The four behaviorally profiled groups showed no differences in exercise tolerance, mood, or quality of life scores at baseline. Globally, all patients improved their exercise tolerance, mood and quality of life. The percentage of responders to 6MST and VSRQ (>MCID) was 7.5% and 5.3% higher with the behavioral approach. For non-responders to 6MST and VSRQ (<MCID), only patients benefiting from the behavioral approach improved the other parameters studied, patients from control group having exhibited no improvement at all.
CONCLUSIONS: The DISC-guided behavioral approach improves the patient-caregiver relationship and achieves better results at the end of PR.

PMID: 30630645 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Current Status of Pulmonary Rehabilitation: Introductory Remarks on Pulmonary Rehabilitation, the Importance and the Practice.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Current Status of Pulmonary Rehabilitation: Introductory Remarks on Pulmonary Rehabilitation, the Importance and the Practice.

COPD. 2018 06;15(3):215-218

Authors: Porszasz J, Brusasco V

PMID: 30388908 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Differing Approaches to Managing the Chronic Breathlessness Syndrome in Advanced COPD: A Multi-National Survey of Specialists.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Differing Approaches to Managing the Chronic Breathlessness Syndrome in Advanced COPD: A Multi-National Survey of Specialists.

COPD. 2018 06;15(3):294-302

Authors: Smallwood N, Currow D, Booth S, Spathis A, Irving L, Philip J

Abstract
This study explored the approaches of respiratory and palliative medicine specialists to managing the chronic breathlessness syndrome in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A voluntary, online survey was emailed to all specialists and trainees in respiratory medicine in Australia and New Zealand (ANZ), and to all palliative medicine specialists and trainees in ANZ and the United Kingdom (UK). Five hundred and seventy-seven (33.0%) responses were received from 1,749 specialists, with 440 (25.2%) complete questionnaires included from 177 respiratory and 263 palliative medicine doctors. Palliative medicine doctors in ANZ and the UK had similar approaches to managing chronic breathlessness, whereas respiratory and palliative medicine doctors had significantly different approaches (p < 0.0001). Both specialties most commonly recommended a combination of non-pharmacological and pharmacological breathlessness management strategies. Respiratory doctors focussed more on pulmonary rehabilitation, whereas palliative medicine doctors recommended breathing techniques, anxiety management and the handheld fan. Palliative medicine doctors (197 (74.9%)) recommended short acting oral morphine for breathlessness, as compared with 73 (41.2%) respiratory doctors (p < 0.0001). Respiratory doctors cited opioid concerns related to respiratory depression and lack of knowledge. Nineteen (10.7%) respiratory doctors made no specific recommendations for managing chronic breathlessness. Both specialties reported actively managing chronic breathlessness, albeit with differing approaches. Integrated services, which combine the complementary knowledge and approaches of both specialities, may overcome current gaps in care and improve the management of distressing, chronic breathlessness.

PMID: 30204492 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Directional brain networks underlying OM chanting.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Directional brain networks underlying OM chanting.

Asian J Psychiatr. 2018 Oct;37:20-25

Authors: Rao NP, Deshpande G, Gangadhar KB, Arasappa R, Varambally S, Venkatasubramanian G, Ganagadhar BN

Abstract
OM chanting is an ancient technique of Indian meditation. OM chanting is associated with an experience of relaxation, changes in autonomic balance and deactivation of limbic brain regions. While functional localization is important, how brain regions interact with each other has been shown to underlie various brain functions. Therefore, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that there is reduced communication between deactivated regions during OM chanting. In order to do so, we employed multivariate autoregressive model (MVAR) based Granger causality to obtain directional connectivity between deactivated regions. fMRI scans of 12 right handed healthy volunteers (9 Men) from a previously published study was used in which participants performed OM chanting and a control condition in a block design. We found that outputs from insula, anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortices were significantly reduced in OM condition. Of interest is the reduction of outputs from these regions to limbic area amygdala. Modulation of brain regions involved in emotion processing and implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD) raises a potential possibility of OM chanting in the treatment of MDD.

PMID: 30099280 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

For Distinguished Contributions to Psychophysiology: Robert W. Levenson.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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For Distinguished Contributions to Psychophysiology: Robert W. Levenson.

Psychophysiology. 2018 09;55(9):e13204

Authors: Miller GA

PMID: 30059148 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Walking with controlled breathing improves exercise tolerance, anxiety, and quality of life in heart failure patients: A randomized controlled trial.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Walking with controlled breathing improves exercise tolerance, anxiety, and quality of life in heart failure patients: A randomized controlled trial.

Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2018 12;17(8):717-727

Authors: Teng HC, Yeh ML, Wang MH

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients with heart failure experience not only impaired physical condition, but also their physical activity, moods, and quality of life may be diminished.
AIMS: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 12-week walking with breathing program on physical activity tolerance considering time-dependent physiological factors and time-independent interoceptive awareness, as well as psychosocial factors.
METHODS: This randomized controlled trial recruited 90 heart failure patients and randomly assigned them. The walking with breathing group received the walking and breathing intervention for 12 weeks but the control group did not. Outcomes included activity tolerance measured by 6-minute walk distance, moods assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, quality of life determined by the EuroQol 5-Dimensions, oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry, and interoceptive awareness by the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness scale. Data were collected before the intervention at baseline and at Weeks 2, 4 and 12.
RESULTS: The results of the generalized estimating equation showed the 6-minute walk distance in the walking with breathing group was significantly different across time ( p<0.001) compared with the control group at baseline. Oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry ( p=0.04) and Trusting on the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness scale ( p=0.001) significantly and positively correlated with results of the 6-minute walk distance. There were significant between-group differences at Week 12 in anxiety ( p=0.03) and quality of life ( p=0.02) but not depression ( p=0.06).
CONCLUSIONS: Walking with breathing improved heart failure patients' tolerance of physical activity, probably because of improved oxygen saturation and trusting interoceptive awareness. Walking with breathing also improved patients' anxiety and quality of life.

PMID: 29775076 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Coupling of respiration and attention via the locus coeruleus: Effects of meditation and pranayama.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Coupling of respiration and attention via the locus coeruleus: Effects of meditation and pranayama.

Psychophysiology. 2018 09;55(9):e13091

Authors: Melnychuk MC, Dockree PM, O'Connell RG, Murphy PR, Balsters JH, Robertson IH

Abstract
The locus coeruleus (LC) has established functions in both attention and respiration. Good attentional performance requires optimal levels of tonic LC activity, and must be matched to task consistently. LC neurons are chemosensitive, causing respiratory phrenic nerve firing to increase frequency with higher CO2 levels, and as CO2 level varies with the phase of respiration, tonic LC activity should exhibit fluctuations at respiratory frequency. Top-down modulation of tonic LC activity from brain areas involved in attentional regulation, intended to optimize LC firing to suit task requirements, may have respiratory consequences as well, as increases in LC activity influence phrenic nerve firing. We hypothesize that, due to the physiological and functional overlaps of attentional and respiratory functions of the LC, this small neuromodulatory nucleus is ideally situated to act as a mechanism of synchronization between respiratory and attentional systems, giving rise to a low-amplitude oscillation that enables attentional flexibility, but may also contribute to unintended destabilization of attention. Meditative and pranayama practices result in attentional, emotional, and physiological enhancements that may be partially due to the LC's pivotal role as the nexus in this coupled system. We present original findings of synchronization between respiration and LC activity (via fMRI and pupil dilation) and provide evidence of a relationship between respiratory phase modulation and attentional performance. We also present a mathematical dynamical systems model of respiratory-LC-attentional coupling, review candidate neurophysiological mechanisms of changes in coupling dynamics, and discuss implications for attentional theory, meditation, and pranayama, and possible therapeutic applications.

PMID: 29682753 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

MRI scout images can detect the acute intracerebral hemorrhage on CT.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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MRI scout images can detect the acute intracerebral hemorrhage on CT.

J Neurol Sci. 2018 04 15;387:147-149

Authors: Hayashi T, Aoki J, Suzuki K, Sakamoto Y, Suda S, Okubo S, Mishina M, Kimura K

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently emerged as a first-line tool for investigating acute stroke. However, MRI requires long scan times, which could be detrimental for severe stroke patients with a large intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). MRI scout images, which are taken prior to a study to determine the range of subsequent images, can be used to rapidly screen the whole brain. We examined whether MRI scout imaging can detect ICHs observed by computed tomography (CT).
METHODS: Between September 2014 and March 2016, consecutive acute ICH patients who underwent both MRI scout and CT imaging in the acute setting were studied. ICHs on MRI scout images were defined as space-occupying lesions. Two neurologists independently assessed the scout images. We investigated whether ICHs on CT scans can be detected on MRI scout images and the characteristics of ICHs not detected by MRI scout images.
RESULTS: One hundred and forty-eight ICH patients (median age, 68 [interquartile range, 59-77] years; 99 [67%] males; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, 11 [4-17]) were enrolled. Among these, 138 (93%) patients were diagnosed as having ICH by MRI scout imaging (positive group), and 10 (7%) patients were not (negative group). The bleeding volume was 9.3 [4.5-22.4] ml in the positive group and 1.0 [0.4-2.0] ml in the negative group (p < .001). The cut-off value of bleeding volume calculated from the receiver operating characteristic curve was 2.0 ml. Regarding ICH lesions, 4 (44%) of the 9 pontine hemorrhages were detected on MRI scout images, whereas 134 (96%) of the 139 other hemorrhages were diagnosed (p < .001).
CONCLUSIONS: We diagnosed >90% of ICHs using MRI scout images. Low levels of ICH and pontine hemorrhaging might be difficult to detect using MRI scout imaging.

PMID: 29571852 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Clinical and cognitive aspects of functional (psychogenic) tremor].

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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[Clinical and cognitive aspects of functional (psychogenic) tremor].

Nervenarzt. 2018 Apr;89(4):400-407

Authors: Zeuner KE, Schmidt R, Schwingenschuh P

Abstract
Functional (psychogenic) tremor is the most common functional movement disorder. Characteristic clinical features, so called red flags, can help to make the clinical distinction of this type from other tremor disorders. The most common features include the variability of frequency and amplitude. Clinical examination should include different types of distraction including motor or cognitive tasks or testing the influence of suggestibility on tremor amplitude, frequency or direction. Patients often report sudden onset and remissions that may last for months or even years. In some cases, the tremor is only present in highly specific situations. Although functional tremor shares characteristics with voluntary actions, patients experience their abnormal movements as involuntary. Recent experimental approaches have revealed an impairment in sense of agency. The diagnosis can be supported by neurophysiological measurements including accelerometry, which achieved a sensitivity of 89.5% and a specificity of 95.9% in a validated test battery, thus providing a useful additional diagnostic tool. Psychotherapeutic treatment is indicated in patients with and without evident psychological symptoms. A specific physiotherapeutic approach for functional tremor is re-trainment.

PMID: 29327097 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Tai Chi Chuan in postsurgical non-small cell lung cancer patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Tai Chi Chuan in postsurgical non-small cell lung cancer patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Trials. 2018 Jan 04;19(1):2

Authors: Pan H, Pei Y, Li B, Wang Y, Liu J, Lin H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Impairment of exercise capacity remains a common adverse effect of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) survivors after surgery. Previous research has suggested that Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) offers an exercise capacity benefit in several types of cancers. This is a randomized trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of TCC in postoperative NSCLC patients over an observation period of 3 months and a 9-month follow-up.
METHODS/DESIGN: Using a prospective, one center and randomized design, 120 subjects with histologically confirmed stage I-IIIA NSCLC following complete surgical resection will potentially be eligible for this trial. Following baseline assessments, eligible participants will be randomly assigned to one of two conditions: (1) TCC training, or (2) placebo control. The training sessions for both groups will last 60 min and take place three times a week for 3 months. The sessions will be supervised with target intensity of 60-80% of work capacity, dyspnea, and heart rate management. The primary study endpoint is peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak), and the secondary endpoints include: 6-min walk distance (6MWD), health-related quality of life (HRQoL), lung function, immunity function, and the state of depression and anxiety. All endpoints will be assessed at the baseline and postintervention (3 months). A follow-up period of 9 months will be included. The main time points for the evaluation of clinical efficacy and safety will be months 3, 6, 9, and 12 after enrollment.
DISCUSSION: This study will assess the effect of group TCC in postsurgery NSCLC survivors on VO2peak, lung function, and other aspects. The results of this study will eventually provide clinical proof of the application of TCC as one kind of exercise training for patients across the entire NSCLC continuum, as well as information on the safety and feasibility of exercise.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-IOR-15006548 . Registered on 12 June 2015.

PMID: 29301544 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Outcome Measures Used in Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients With Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Outcome Measures Used in Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients With Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review.

Phys Ther. 2018 03 01;98(3):191-204

Authors: Oliveira AL, Marques AS

Abstract
Background: Conflicting results about the effects of community-based pulmonary rehabilitation in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) exist, possibly because the variety of outcome measures used and the lack of appropriate measurement properties hinder the development of pulmonary rehabilitation guidelines.
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify and review the measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and clinical outcome measures of AECOPD that are used in pulmonary rehabilitation and that can be easily applied in a community setting.
Data Sources: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and CINAHL were searched up to July 1, 2016.
Study Selection: Phase 1 identified outcome measures used in pulmonary rehabilitation for AECOPD. Phase 2 reviewed the measurement properties of the identified outcome measures.
Data Extraction: One reviewer extracted the data and 2 reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of the studies and the measurement properties of the outcome measures by using the Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Status Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) recommendations.
Data Synthesis: Twenty-three PROMs and 18 clinical outcome measures were found. The outcome measures most used were the St George Respiratory Questionnaire (n = 15/37 studies) and the 6-minute walk test (n = 21/37 studies). Thirty-two studies described the measurement properties of 22 PROMs and 7 clinical outcome measures. The methodological quality of the studies was mostly poor, and the measurement properties were mostly indeterminate. The outcome measure exhibiting more robust properties was the COPD Assessment Test.
Limitations: A Number of studies were not found with the validated search strategy used and were included a posteriori; the fact that 3 studies presented combined results- for patients who were stable and patients with exacerbation-affected the conclusions that can be drawn.
Conclusions: A Large variety of outcome measures have been used; however, studies on their measurement properties are needed to enhance the understanding of community pulmonary rehabilitation for AECOPD.

PMID: 29228288 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Brief compassion focused imagery for treatment of severe head injury.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Brief compassion focused imagery for treatment of severe head injury.

Neuropsychol Rehabil. 2019 Jul;29(6):917-927

Authors: Campbell IN, Gallagher M, McLeod HJ, O'Neill B, McMillan TM

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether participants with severe head injury (SHI) allocated to a brief compassion focused imagery (CFI) intervention show greater change in compassion than those exposed to relaxation imagery (RI).
METHOD: Participants were exposed to a preparatory video to promote engagement and then randomly allocated to intervention. Pre- and post-preparatory measures were Motivation for Intervention and Fears of Compassion Scales, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and PANAS. Pre- and post-intervention self-report measures were the Empathy Quotient, Self-Compassion Scale, STAI and Relaxation Scale. Heart rate variability (HRV) was monitored throughout.
RESULTS: Motivation for therapy increased after the preparatory video (z = 3.44, p = 0.001). Across the intervention, group differences were not found on self-report measures or HRV changes. When CFI and RI groups were pooled, improvement in relaxation (r = .41, p < 0.01) and state anxiety (r = .29, p < 0.05) were found across the intervention; these outcomes were not associated with changes in self-compassion or HRV.
CONCLUSION: Brief CFI, a central aspect of compassion focused therapy, did not produce a reliable change in people with SHI. Enhanced motivation for psychological therapy after a brief preparatory video is relevant and underlines the need to understand mechanisms of action rather than the pursuing whole protocol approaches to therapy.

PMID: 28664763 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Routine Yoga Practice Impacts Whole Body Protein Utilization in Healthy Women.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Routine Yoga Practice Impacts Whole Body Protein Utilization in Healthy Women.

J Aging Phys Act. 2018 01 01;26(1):68-74

Authors: Colletto M, Rodriguez N

Abstract
Whole body protein utilization (WBPU), which includes flux (Q), protein synthesis (PS), protein breakdown (PB), and whole body protein balance (WBPB), provides insight regarding muscle mass, a criterion for sarcopenia. To characterize yoga's impact on WBPU, body composition and functional measures in healthy (50-65 years) women. WBPU and functional measures were compared between women who routinely practiced yoga (YOGA; n = 7) and nonactive counterparts (CON; n = 8). Q (0.61 ± 0.06 vs. 0.78 ± 0.07, p = .04), PS (3.07 ± 0.37 vs. 4.17 ± 0.40, p = .03), PB (2.59 ± 0.48 vs. 3.80 ± 0.48, p = .05) were lower, and lean body mass higher (64 ± 1 vs. 58 ± 2%, p ≤ .01) for YOGA vs. CON, respectively. WBPB and functional measures were similar. Routine yoga practice influenced WBPU in healthy older women. Study findings are novel and provide a basis for future investigations evaluating long-term benefits of yoga as an alternative mode of exercise for maintaining muscle mass in support of active aging.

PMID: 28422542 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Self-Regulatory Imagery and Physical Activity in Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Social-Cognitive Perspective.

Wed, 2019-05-29 06:15
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Self-Regulatory Imagery and Physical Activity in Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Social-Cognitive Perspective.

J Aging Phys Act. 2018 01 01;26(1):14-24

Authors: Kosteli MC, Cumming J, Williams SE

Abstract
Limited research has investigated exercise imagery use in middle-aged and older adults and its relationship with affective and behavioral correlates. The study examined the association between self-regulatory imagery and physical activity (PA) through key social cognitive variables. Middle-aged and older adults (N = 299; M age = 59.73 years, SD = 7.73, range = 50 to 80) completed self-report measures assessing self-regulatory imagery use, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, perceived barriers, self-regulatory behavior, enjoyment, and PA levels. Path analysis supported a model (χ² [14] = 21.76, p = .08, CFI = .99, TLI = .97, SRMR = .03, RMSEA = .04) whereby self-regulatory imagery positively predicted self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and self-regulatory behaviors. Furthermore, self-regulatory imagery indirectly predicted barriers, outcome expectations, self-regulation, enjoyment, and PA. This research highlights self-regulatory imagery as an effective strategy in modifying exercise-related cognitions and behaviors. Incorporating social cognitive constructs into the design of imagery interventions may increase PA engagement.

PMID: 28338385 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The vagus neurometabolic interface and clinical disease.

Tue, 2019-05-28 15:14
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The vagus neurometabolic interface and clinical disease.

Int J Obes (Lond). 2018 06;42(6):1101-1111

Authors: Masi EB, Valdés-Ferrer SI, Steinberg BE

Abstract
The nervous system both monitors and modulates body metabolism to maintain homoeostasis. In disease states such as obesity and diabetes, the neurometabolic interface is dysfunctional and contributes to clinical illness. The vagus nerve, in particular, with both sensory and motor fibres, provides an anatomical substrate for this interface. Its sensory fibres contain receptors for important circulating metabolic mediators, including leptin and cholecystokinin, and provide real-time information about these mediators to the central nervous system. In turn, efferent fibres within the vagus nerve participate in a brain-gut axis to regulate metabolism. In this review, we describe these vagus nerve-mediated metabolic pathways and recent clinical trials of vagus nerve stimulation for the management of obesity. These early studies suggest that neuromodulation approaches that employ electricity to tune neurometabolic circuits may represent a new tool in the clinical armamentarium directed against obesity.

PMID: 29795463 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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