Mind-Body Medicine | Page 3 | MUIH
Left Arrow
Right Arrow
MUIH
MUIH
Home / Feed aggregator / Sources / Mind-Body Medicine

.

Mind-Body Medicine

Subscribe to Mind-Body Medicine feed Mind-Body Medicine
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]
Updated: 11 min 27 sec ago

[The influence of types of living alone on 2-year health changes according to elderly adults' marital status: Based on the Comprehensive Regional Studies for Preventing Isolation of the Elderly Who Live in Metropolitan Area (CAPITAL Study)].

Tue, 2019-04-09 07:21
Related Articles

[The influence of types of living alone on 2-year health changes according to elderly adults' marital status: Based on the Comprehensive Regional Studies for Preventing Isolation of the Elderly Who Live in Metropolitan Area (CAPITAL Study)].

Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi. 2019;66(3):129-137

Authors: Hashimoto Y, Watanabe S, Nonaka K, Koike T, Hasebe M, Murayama Y, Suzuki H, Fukaya T, Kobayashi E, Fujiwara Y

Abstract
Objectives The aim of this research is to classify elderly adults who live alone by their marital status type and to clarify how those types affect their higher-level functional capacity and mental health with a 2-year follow-up survey.Methods This research is based on the results from a survey in 2013. The base-line scores were from 757 participants who completed a survey by mail, carried out in B area of A ward, Tokyo, within the jurisdiction of community general support centers, with people who were not at nursing care levels 4 or 5 and who were not residents of welfare facilities. This study analyzed data for 517 of 527 participants, who answered all questions in the 2015 survey and indicated their marital status. This research categorized the respondents into 4 types of marital status: separation, divorce, bereavement, and unmarried groups. This study adopted the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence (TMIG-IC) as the index of higher-level functional capacity, and the WHO-Five Well-Being Index (WHO-5-J) as the mental health index. In the analysis of the causes of 2-year variations in TMIG-IC total scores and WHO-5-J scores, the dependent variable was each variation. This study used an analysis of covariance in which the fixed factors were types of living alone, sex, annual income, and having children who lived separately in the 2013 survey, and the covariance comprised the base-line scores for the dependent variables, age, and chronic diseases in the 2013 survey.Results With regards to the variation in TMIG-IC total scores, main effects of the types of living alone were observed. The adjusted variation of covariance decreased most in the separation group (-0.95). For the variation in WHO-5-J scores, main effects of the types of living alone were indicated. In the divorce group, the adjusted variation of covariance was significantly higher than for the unmarried group (2.33 vs. -0.55).Conclusion The results revealed that the types of marital status: separated, divorced, bereaved, and unmarried, affect changes in the higher-level functional capacity and mental health status of elderly adults living alone, 2 years later. Thus, although previously regarded as a single category, types of marital status should be considered in the analysis of elderly adults who live alone.

PMID: 30918204 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

A randomized experimental evaluation of a yoga-based body image intervention.

Tue, 2019-04-09 07:21
Related Articles

A randomized experimental evaluation of a yoga-based body image intervention.

Body Image. 2019 Mar;28:119-127

Authors: Halliwell E, Dawson K, Burkey S

Abstract
Recent literature argues that body image interventions need to become more embodied. This paper evaluates a brief yoga-based body image intervention which incorporates themes specifically tailored to focus on positive body image. Young women (Mage = 20.21, SDage = 2.15) were randomly allocated to a four-session yoga intervention (n = 22) or a control condition (n = 22). Compared to controls, participants in the yoga condition reported significant increases in body appreciation, body connectedness, body satisfaction, and positive mood at posttest and at 4-week follow-up. There were no significant changes in negative mood or body surveillance. These findings add to existing evidence that yoga can improve women's body image and positive mood. In addition, they suggest that a strong thematic focus on positive body image can achieve benefits at relatively low yoga doses. These findings are important as intervention length impacts the potential for dissemination.

PMID: 30660059 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The Feasibility of Using the BrightHearts Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation Application for the Management of Pediatric Procedural Pain: A Pilot Study.

Tue, 2019-04-09 07:21
Related Articles

The Feasibility of Using the BrightHearts Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation Application for the Management of Pediatric Procedural Pain: A Pilot Study.

Pain Pract. 2018 11;18(8):979-987

Authors: Burton KLO, Morrow AM, Beswick BV, Khut GP

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this pilot study was to assess the acceptability and feasibility of using BrightHearts, a biofeedback-assisted relaxation application (app), in children undergoing painful procedures.
METHODS: Thirty children 7 to 18 years of age undergoing a medical procedure (peripheral blood collection, botulinum toxin injection, or intravenous cannula insertion) participated. Participants used BrightHearts, a heart rate-controlled biofeedback-assisted relaxation training app delivered via an iPad with heart rate measured through a pulse oximeter worn on the ear or thumb. Feasibility was assessed through observations and patient, parent/carer, and healthcare professional feedback. Patient, parent/carer, and healthcare professional satisfaction with BrightHearts was rated using investigator-developed surveys.
RESULTS: Eighty-three percent of child participants reported that they found BrightHearts helpful during the procedure and that they would use BrightHearts again. All parents and 96% of healthcare professionals indicated they would use BrightHearts again. Sixty-four percent of healthcare providers perceived that BrightHearts assisted with the ease of performing the procedure. Qualitative analyses found 2 themes: (1) BrightHearts calms through providing distraction and biofeedback and (2) the impact of BrightHearts on the procedure.
CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of using biofeedback-assisted relaxation delivered via the BrightHearts app in children undergoing peripheral blood collection and cannulation. Future studies are required to evaluate BrightHearts' efficacy in reducing pain and anxiety during painful procedures and distinguish the effects of a biofeedback-mediated app from distraction.

PMID: 29667301 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Neurofeedback in adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Tue, 2019-04-09 07:21
Related Articles

Neurofeedback in adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Lancet Psychiatry. 2017 09;4(9):650-651

Authors: Rief W

PMID: 28803031 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Assessment of yoga as an adjuvant treatment for combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

Tue, 2019-04-09 07:21
Related Articles

Assessment of yoga as an adjuvant treatment for combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

Australas Psychiatry. 2017 Aug;25(4):354-357

Authors: McCarthy L, Fuller J, Davidson G, Crump A, Positano S, Alderman C

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study assessed yoga as an adjuvant strategy for symptoms of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
METHODS: Subjects had significant, combat-related PTSD. Control data were collected during an eight-week waiting period. Trauma-sensitive yoga sessions of 90 minutes duration were provided every seven days for eight weeks. Assessments included the PTSD checklist (PCL); the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS); the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); the Adult/Adolescent Sensory Profile (AASP); the SF36 Quality of Life instrument; and a brief, structured pre-enrolment assessment of attitudes towards yoga. Biomarkers were also assessed.
RESULTS: Thirty participants were recruited, with 28 completing the protocol ( Mage=63.5 years). For most variables, there was no significant change in results after the waiting period. Comparing measurements obtained immediately prior to the commencement of the intervention to those taken after completion of eight yoga sessions, significant changes included an increase in the serum dehydroepiandrosterone concentration, decreased total PCL score (and all PCL sub-scales), decreases in all DASS sub-scale scores and significant improvements in PSQI and SF36 scores. No adverse events were reported.
CONCLUSIONS: A range of benefits were observed after yoga, consistent with the theoretical construct for the long history of yoga as a strategy to reduce stress and promote well-being.

PMID: 28747121 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Neurofeedback as an adjunct therapy for treatment of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder related to refugee trauma and torture experiences: two case studies.

Tue, 2019-04-09 07:21
Related Articles

Neurofeedback as an adjunct therapy for treatment of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder related to refugee trauma and torture experiences: two case studies.

Australas Psychiatry. 2017 Aug;25(4):358-363

Authors: Askovic M, Watters AJ, Aroche J, Harris AWF

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to describe the use of neurofeedback for refugee-related chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in two case studies.
METHODS: We describe the assessment and application of neurofeedback integrated into the treatment of two clients with chronic PTSD. We include details of our treatment schedule, symptoms and quantitative electrophysiological data for each case. Results All clients achieved significant reduction in symptoms of PTSD and improvement in daily functioning post-neurofeedback therapy. Quantitative electroencephalogric (EEG) measures indicate a normalisation of EEG markers relating to trauma, including overarousal at rest and working memory function. Conclusions Neurofeedback as an adjunct to trauma-informed therapy may help to remediate chronic PTSD relating to refugee experiences. If replicated then improvements demonstrated in this population would be generalisable to all chronic PTSD.

PMID: 28699778 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effect of a Yoga Based Meditation Technique on Emotional Regulation, Self-compassion and Mindfulness in College Students.

Sat, 2019-04-06 07:13
Related Articles

Effect of a Yoga Based Meditation Technique on Emotional Regulation, Self-compassion and Mindfulness in College Students.

Explore (NY). 2018 11;14(6):443-447

Authors: Patel NK, Nivethitha L, Mooventhan A

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Emotion regulation is often a challenge for the college students. Yoga practice has been shown to reduce stress and improve mindfulness that is related to emotion regulation. Mastering emotions technique (MEMT) is one of the yoga-based meditation techniques that are designed to control emotions among practitioners. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no known study reporting its scientific evidence-based effects on emotion and its related variables. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of MEMT on emotion regulation, self-compassion, and mindfulness in college students.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-two subjects with the age varied from 18 to 25 years were recruited from a residential college. All the subjects underwent MEMT for the duration of 45 min a day for a period of 2 weeks. Assessments such as Emotional Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ), The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) were taken before and after the intervention.
RESULTS: Results of this study showed a significant increase in the scores of cognitive reappraisal, positive affect, self-compassion, and MAAS along with a significant reduction in the scores of negative affect, and expressive suppression after the practice of MEMT compared to its respective baseline.
CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study suggest that practice of MEMT is effective in improving emotion regulation, positive affects, self-compassion, and mindfulness while in reducing negative affects among college students.

PMID: 30366832 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Juniper Subtle Energy Healing: A Case Study.

Sat, 2019-04-06 07:13
Related Articles

Juniper Subtle Energy Healing: A Case Study.

Explore (NY). 2018 11;14(6):424-429

Authors: Pascale CM, Schaeff CM

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This pilot case study sought to examine the efficacy of subtle energy treatments as conducted by Buddhist healing master Segyu Rinpoche at his Juniper Integrative Clinic in Northern California.
DESIGN: Over the course of a year, this study followed two patients with terminal diagnoses, their treating physicians, and Segyu Rinpoche as the patients underwent treatment at the Juniper Clinic. The patients entering the study had exhausted all known medical options. One patient suffered from chronic lymphocytic leukemia [CLL] and the other from bronchiolitis obliterans [BOS] brought about by graft versus host disease following a bone marrow transplant for leukemia. Their treating physicians are prominent members of two different teaching/research hospitals. This was an IRB approved study conducted in conformity with HIPAA standards.
SETTING: The patients participated in treatments with Segyu Rinpoche twice a month at his clinic and engaged in daily meditation as instructed by Rinpoche. The study followed both patients through in-depth, face-to-face interviews, wellness surveys, weekly journal entries, and medical records. The study also followed the physicians and Segyu Rinpoche through face-to-face interviews.
RESULTS: Both patients and physicians identified significant shifts in patient wellbeing, including less pain, greater happiness and more ease. In addition, both physicians and patients reported a reduced need for medication. Some aspects of the design were more or less successful in tracking patient experience (i.e., health and wellness survey vs. personal journals). The success of the pilot indicates that more qualitative case studies are needed.
CONCLUSIONS: Patients and physicians identified a significant increase in overall patient wellbeing. Hence, on an anecdotal level, the study demonstrated the usefulness of subtle energy healing as practiced by Segyu Rinpoche and the Juniper Clinic. The success of the pilot indicates the potential value of full qualitative studies for this modality.

PMID: 30340994 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

A Randomized Trial of a Group-Based Integrative Medicine Approach Compared to Waitlist Control on Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms in Adults.

Sat, 2019-04-06 07:13
Related Articles

A Randomized Trial of a Group-Based Integrative Medicine Approach Compared to Waitlist Control on Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms in Adults.

Explore (NY). 2018 11;14(6):406-413

Authors: McDonald E, Teets R, Ortiz C, Gilchrist C, Waltermaurer E, Perez E, Kligler B

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic debilitating functional gastrointestinal disorder that affects a large proportion of the general population. Dietary and mind-body approaches have shown some effectiveness in reducing IBS symptoms.
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this project was to test the feasibility of a low cost, group-oriented integrative medicine approach to IBS, and to explore whether such an approach improves participant outcomes.
METHODS: This was a randomized-controlled trial involving a 4-week group-oriented treatment intervention combining dietary intervention and mind-body therapies followed by 8-weeks of telephonic health coaching. Differences between the intervention and control groups on IBS-specific measures were examined at baseline, 4, 8, and 12-week.
RESULTS: Fifty-two participants completed the study, 30 in the control group and 22 in the intervention group. On the IBS Symptom Severity Score, at 4 weeks the intervention group showed statistically significant improvement compared to the control group (p < .02), which was sustained at the 8 and 12-week data points as well, with the proportion of the intervention group experiencing moderate to severe symptoms decreasing from 81.3% at baseline to 45% at week 4 and 54.5% at week 12. A statistically significant improvement was also seen on the CES-D measure of depression between baseline and week 12 in the intervention group compared to controls. On the IBS Quality of Life measure we did not observe a statistically significant difference between the groups.
CONCLUSIONS: This low-cost, group-oriented intervention approach offers a strategy to address the challenge of access to this type of integrative approach for patients of low socioeconomic status or limited means.

PMID: 30243949 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Treatment of Stroke Patients with Shoulder-wrist Syndrome by Acupoint Catgut Embedding and Surface Electromyogram Biofeedback Therapy].

Sat, 2019-04-06 07:13
Related Articles

[Treatment of Stroke Patients with Shoulder-wrist Syndrome by Acupoint Catgut Embedding and Surface Electromyogram Biofeedback Therapy].

Zhen Ci Yan Jiu. 2018 Jun 25;43(6):380-3

Authors: Zhu RH, Yang M, Dai JL, Zhu XH, Bi H, Sun L, Dou ZC, Wu MM

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To observe the clinical effectiveness of acupoint catgut embedding and surface electromyogram biofeedback therapy (sEMGBF) in the treatment of stroke patients complicated with shoulder-hand syndrome (SHS).
METHODS: A total of 90 stroke patients with SHS were randomly divided into acupoint catgut embedment (ACE), sEMGBF and ACE+sEMGBF (combined treatment) groups (n=30 cases/group). The catgut embedment was performed at Jianliao (LI 14), Jianyu (LI 15), Quchi (LI 11), Waiguan (TE 5) on the affected side, once every 3 weeks, twice altogether. The electromyographic biofeedback therapy (30-50 Hz, pulse duration 200 µs, 6 s-on and 10 s-off, appropriate strength) was applied to the skin area co-vering the deltoid muscle, flexor muscle of wrist and wrist extensor for 20 min, once per day, 5 times/week, for 6 weeks. The total effective rate was assessed by using Liao's and Zhu's methods (1996), the pain severity assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS), and Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA, 66-points) scale and the patients' activities of daily living function (ADL, 100-points) were also scored.
RESULTS: Before treatment, the VAS, FMA and ADL points of the three groups were not significantly different (P>0.05). After the treatment, the total effective rate (93.33%), FMA and ADL scores of the combined treatment group were significantly higher than those of the ACE and sEMGBF groups (P<0.05), while the VAS score of the combined treatment group was significantly lower than those of the ACE and sEMGBF groups (P<0.05). The total effective rates, FMA and ADL scores of the ACE and sEMGBF groups were comparable (P>0.05). The VAS score of the ACE group was markedly lower than that of the sEMGBF group (P<0.05).
CONCLUSION: The combined administration of ACE and sEMGBF has a better therapeutic effect for stroke patients complicated with SHS relevant to simple ACE and simple sEMGBF therapy in improving the upper limb function, relieving pain, and enhancing the daily life quality.

PMID: 30091545 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Music processing in preterm and full-term newborns: A psychophysiological interaction (PPI) approach in neonatal fMRI.

Sat, 2019-04-06 07:13
Related Articles

Music processing in preterm and full-term newborns: A psychophysiological interaction (PPI) approach in neonatal fMRI.

Neuroimage. 2019 01 15;185:857-864

Authors: Lordier L, Loukas S, Grouiller F, Vollenweider A, Vasung L, Meskaldij DE, Lejeune F, Pittet MP, Borradori-Tolsa C, Lazeyras F, Grandjean D, Van De Ville D, Hüppi PS

Abstract
Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) provide special equipment designed to give life support for the increasing number of prematurely born infants and assure their survival. More recently NICU's strive to include developmentally oriented care and modulate sensory input for preterm infants. Music, among other sensory stimuli, has been introduced into NICUs, but without knowledge on the basic music processing in the brain of preterm infants. In this study, we explored the cortico-subcortical music processing of different types of conditions (Original music, Tempo modification, Key transposition) in newborns shortly after birth to assess the effective connectivity of the primary auditory cortex with the entire newborn brain. Additionally, we investigated if early exposure during NICU stay modulates brain processing of music in preterm infants at term equivalent age. We approached these two questions using Psychophysiological Interaction (PPI) analyses. A group of preterm infants listened to music (Original music) starting from 33 weeks postconceptional age until term equivalent age and were compared to two additional groups without music intervention; preterm infants and full-term newborns. Auditory cortex functional connectivity with cerebral regions known to be implicated in tempo and familiarity processing were identified only for preterm infants with music training in the NICU. Increased connectivity between auditory cortices and thalamus and dorsal striatum may not only reflect their sensitivity to the known music and the processing of its tempo as familiar, but these results are also compatible with the hypothesis that the previously listened music induces a more arousing and pleasant state. Our results suggest that music exposure in NICU's environment can induce brain functional connectivity changes that are associated with music processing.

PMID: 29630995 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Treatment for Patients With a Functional Neurological Disorder (Conversion Disorder): An Integrated Approach.

Sat, 2019-04-06 07:13
Related Articles

Treatment for Patients With a Functional Neurological Disorder (Conversion Disorder): An Integrated Approach.

Am J Psychiatry. 2018 04 01;175(4):307-314

Authors: O'Neal MA, Baslet G

PMID: 29606068 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Vesical and Ureteral Damage from Voiding Dysfunction in Boys Without Neurologic or Obstructive Disease.

Sat, 2019-04-06 07:13
Related Articles

Vesical and Ureteral Damage from Voiding Dysfunction in Boys Without Neurologic or Obstructive Disease.

J Urol. 2017 02;197(2S):S127-S131

Authors: Hinman F, Baumann FW

PMID: 28012756 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Current and emerging therapies in premature ejaculation: Where we are coming from, where we are going.

Sat, 2019-04-06 07:13
Related Articles

Current and emerging therapies in premature ejaculation: Where we are coming from, where we are going.

Int J Urol. 2017 01;24(1):40-50

Authors: Martin C, Nolen H, Podolnick J, Wang R

Abstract
Premature ejaculation is the most common form of sexual dysfunction among men. The pathophysiology of premature ejaculation appears to be multifactorial, implicating the need for multimodal therapeutic regimens to successfully treat premature ejaculation. Multiple treatment regimens have been shown to be effective in extending the time between penetration and ejaculation. These treatment modalities include everything from behavioral modifications and medications to diet alterations and major surgery. The goal of the present article was to review the commonly used treatment regimens used in the treatment of premature ejaculation, as well as to introduce and discuss the newest treatment routines under study for the treatment of premature ejaculation.

PMID: 27704632 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

What Should Health Care Systems Consider When Implementing Complementary and Integrative Health: Lessons from Veterans Health Administration.

Fri, 2019-04-05 07:10
Related Articles

What Should Health Care Systems Consider When Implementing Complementary and Integrative Health: Lessons from Veterans Health Administration.

J Altern Complement Med. 2019 Mar;25(S1):S52-S60

Authors: Taylor SL, Bolton R, Huynh A, Dvorin K, Elwy AR, Bokhour BG, Whitehead A, Kligler B

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Health care systems are increasingly interested in becoming whole health systems that include complementary and integrative health (CIH) approaches. The nation's largest health care system, the Veterans Health Administration (VA), has been transforming to such a system. However, anecdotal evidence suggested that many VA medical centers have faced challenges in implementing CIH approaches, whereas others have flourished. We report on a large-scale, research-operations partnered effort to understand the challenges faced by VA sites and the strategies used to address these to better support VAs implementation of CIH nationally.
DESIGN: We conducted semi-structured, in-person qualitative interviews with 149 key stakeholders at 8 VA medical centers, with content based on Greenhalgh's implementation framework. For analysis, we identified a priori categories of content aligned with Greenhalgh's framework and then generated additional categories developed inductively, capturing additional implementation experiences. These categories formed a template to aid in coding data.
RESULTS: VA sites commonly reported that nine key factors facilitated CIH implementation: (1) organizing individual CIH approaches into one program instead of spreading across several departments; (2) having CIH strategic plans and steering committees; (3) strong, professional, and enthusiastic CIH program leads and practitioners; (4) leadership support; (5) providers' positive attitudes toward CIH; (6) perceptions of patients' attitudes; (7) demonstrating evidence of CIH effectiveness; (8) champions; and (9) effectively marketing. Common challenges included are: (1) difficulties in hiring; (2) insufficient/inconsistent CIH funding; (3) appropriate patient access to CIH approaches; (4) difficulties in coding/documenting CIH use; (5) insufficient/inappropriate space; (6) insufficient staff's and provider's time; and (7) the health care cultural and geographic environments. Sites also reported several successful strategies supporting CIH implementation.
CONCLUSIONS: VA sites experience both success and challenges with implementing CIH approaches and have developed a wide range of strategies to support their implementation efforts. This information is potentially useful to other health care organizations considering how best to support CIH provision.

PMID: 30870020 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Evaluation of an Integrative Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Treatment Program.

Fri, 2019-04-05 07:10
Related Articles

Evaluation of an Integrative Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Treatment Program.

J Altern Complement Med. 2019 Mar;25(S1):S147-S152

Authors: Hilton LG, Libretto S, Xenakis L, Elfenbaum P, Boyd C, Zhang W, Clark AA

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and combat-related stress can be refractory, pervasive, and have a devastating impact on those affected, their families, and society at large. Challenges dealing with symptoms may in turn make a servicemember more susceptible to problems, including alcohol abuse, interpersonal conflict, and occupational problems. An effective treatment strategy will address multifactorial issues by using a holistic multimodal approach. Back on Track is an intensive outpatient program utilizing a holistic philosophy and multimodal treatments to provide a whole systems approach for the treatment of combat-related stress reactions and PTSD in active duty servicemembers.
DESIGN/SETTING/SUBJECTS: An explanatory, sequential, mixed-methods program evaluation was conducted to assess the effectiveness of a PTSD and combat stress treatment program. Quantitative outcomes were collected and analyzed on 595 participants at pre- and postinterventions and 6-week follow-up and qualitative data were gathered through participant interviews.
INTERVENTION: The manualized program uses a multimodal, psychoeducational group therapy format with a holistic approach for treating combat stress, increasing resiliency, and assisting with reintegration. Rotating providers visit from other programs and services to deliver content in bio-psycho-social-spiritual domains, including didactic lectures on mindfulness and the relaxation response and daily sessions of yoga nidra and meditation.
OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was PTSD symptom severity assessed with the PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M). Secondary outcomes included self-efficacy, knowledge, use, and satisfaction. Quantitative data were contextualized with interview data.
RESULTS: Results demonstrated a highly statistically significant effect of the program when comparing within-subject PCL-M scores before and after program participation, signed rank S (N = 595) = -47,367, p < 0.001. This translates to a moderate effect size, Cohen's d (N = 595) = -0.55, 95% confidence interval = -0.62 to -0.47, and a mean decrease of 7 points on the PCL-M at postintervention, demonstrating response to treatment. There were significant increases in knowledge and self-efficacy and high levels of satisfaction with the program overall, content, materials, and delivery.
CONCLUSIONS: The treatment program has served ∼800 servicemembers since inception and has since expanded to five installations. The provision of whole systems care where the approach is holistic, multimodal, and multidisciplinary may be a way forward for the successful treatment of PTSD and other debilitating behavioral health conditions in military contexts and beyond.

PMID: 30870017 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Outcomes from a Whole-Systems Ayurvedic Medicine and Yoga Therapy Treatment for Obesity Pilot Study.

Fri, 2019-04-05 07:10
Related Articles

Outcomes from a Whole-Systems Ayurvedic Medicine and Yoga Therapy Treatment for Obesity Pilot Study.

J Altern Complement Med. 2019 Mar;25(S1):S124-S137

Authors: Rioux J, Howerter A

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine the feasibility and acceptability of an Ayurveda/Yoga intervention for weight loss, using dual-diagnosis inclusion criteria, dual-paradigm outcomes, and a semistandardized protocol with tailoring according to the Ayurvedic constitution/imbalance profile of each participant.
DESIGN: Seventeen participants enrolled in a weekly intervention for 3 months. Outcome measurements were performed at baseline, postintervention, and 3 and 6 months follow-up.
SETTING: The intervention was conducted through the University of Arizona, Department of Family and Community Medicine from April through December 2012.
SUBJECTS: Participants included 2 men and 15 women recruited from the community of Tucson, AZ using flyers and hospital message boards. Seventeen enrolled and 12 participants provided complete follow-up data.
INTERVENTION: Participants met with an Ayurvedic practitioner twice monthly (six times) and followed semistandardized dietary guidelines with individual tailoring to address relevant psychophysiological imbalances obstructing weight loss and a standardized protocol of therapeutic yoga classes three times weekly with recommended home practice of two to four additional sessions.
OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was weight loss. Other biomedical outcomes included body mass index, body fat percentage, waist and hip circumference, waist to hip ratio, and blood pressure. Unique instruments were designed to collect data on outcomes associated with the Ayurvedic medical paradigm, including dietary changes by food qualities, mood/affect, relationships, and changes in Ayurvedic imbalance profiles.
RESULTS: Participants lost an average of 3.5 kg during the 3-month intervention. Weight loss at 3 and 6 months postintervention increased to an average of 5.6 kg and 5.9 kg, respectively. Participants who lost 3% of their body weight during the 12 week intervention, lost on average an additional 3% during the follow-up period. Psychosocial outcomes also improved. No additional services were provided to participants during the follow-up period.
CONCLUSIONS: A whole-systems Ayurvedic medicine and Yoga therapy approach provides a feasible promising noninvasive low-cost alternative to traditional weight loss interventions with potential added benefits associated with sustainable holistic lifestyle modification and positive psychosocial changes.

PMID: 30870013 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Psychophysiological Indicators for Modeling User Experience in Interactive Digital Entertainment.

Fri, 2019-04-05 07:10
Related Articles

Psychophysiological Indicators for Modeling User Experience in Interactive Digital Entertainment.

Sensors (Basel). 2019 Feb 26;19(5):

Authors: Čertický M, Čertický M, Sinčák P, Magyar G, Vaščák J, Cavallo F

Abstract
Analyses of user experience in the electronic entertainment industry currently rely on self-reporting methods, such as surveys, ratings, focus group interviews, etc. We argue that self-reporting alone carries inherent problems-mainly the misinterpretation and temporal delay during longer experiments-and therefore, should not be used as a sole metric. To tackle this problem, we propose the possibility of modeling consumer experience using psychophysiological measures and demonstrate how such models can be trained using machine learning methods. We use a machine learning approach to model user experience using real-time data produced by the autonomic nervous system and involuntary psychophysiological responses. Multiple psychophysiological measures, such as heart rate, electrodermal activity, and respiratory activity, have been used in combination with self-reporting to prepare training sets for machine learning algorithms. The training data was collected from 31 participants during hour-long experiment sessions, where they played multiple video-games. Afterwards, we trained and compared the results of four different machine learning models, out of which the best one produced ∼96% accuracy. The results suggest that psychophysiological measures can indeed be used to assess the enjoyment of digital entertainment consumers.

PMID: 30813552 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Sustained maximal inspiration has similar effects compared to incentive spirometers.

Fri, 2019-04-05 07:10
Related Articles

Sustained maximal inspiration has similar effects compared to incentive spirometers.

Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2019 03;261:67-74

Authors: Mendes LPS, Teixeira LS, da Cruz LJ, Vieira DSR, Parreira VF

Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the effects of flow incentive spirometer (FIS), volume incentive spirometer (VIS), and sustained maximal inspiration exercise (SMI) on breathing pattern, chest wall motion, and thoracoabdominal asynchrony.
METHODS: Sixteen healthy adults aged 27.63 ± 5.26 years were evaluated by optoelectronic plethysmography in the supine position with trunk inclination of 45° during quiet breathing and during exercise performance.
RESULTS: In the comparisons among exercises, VIS promoted a significantly higher inspiratory time and lower mean inspiratory flow compared with FIS. The rating of perceived exertion according to the Borg Scale was significantly higher after the performance of FIS compared with VIS. Regarding asynchrony, none of the exercises caused changes in thoracoabdominal synchrony between the rib cage and abdomen. However, both devices significantly reduced the asynchrony between the pulmonary and abdominal rib cage compared with quiet breathing.
CONCLUSION: SMI exercise was equivalent to incentive spirometers and may be an interesting alternative for clinical use in cases in which it is not possible to acquire the devices.

PMID: 30654164 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Clinical effect of psychological and behavioral intervention combined with biofeedback in the treatment of preschool children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

Thu, 2019-04-04 07:43
Related Articles

[Clinical effect of psychological and behavioral intervention combined with biofeedback in the treatment of preschool children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi. 2019 Mar;21(3):229-233

Authors: Huang XX, Ou P, Qian QF, Huang Y, Yang SW, Wang YX, Huang S, Wang ZQ, Xie YQ

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical effect of psychological and behavioral intervention combined with biofeedback in the treatment of preschool children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
METHODS: Sixty children each with inattentive, hyperactive/impulsive or combined type ADHD were enrolled. According to the intervention measure, they were randomly divided into 4 groups: control, psychological and behavioral intervention, biofeedback treatment and comprehensive treatment (psychological and behavioral intervention + biofeedback). Attention concentration time and impulse/hyperactivity and hyperactivity index scores of the Conners Parent Symptom Questionnaire (PSQ) were evaluated after 4 months of treatment.
RESULTS: The attention concentration time increased in all types children with ADHD after psychological and behavioral intervention, biofeedback treatment or comprehensive treatment (P<0.05). In children with inattentive ADHD, hyperactive/impulsive ADHD or combined-type ADHD, biofeedback or comprehensive treatment reduced the impulse/hyperactivity index score (P<0.05). In children with inattentive or combined-type ADHD, psychological and behavioral intervention or comprehensive treatment reduced the hyperactivity index score (P<0.05). In children with hyperactive/impulsive ADHD, biofeedback treatment, psychological and behavioral intervention or comprehensive treatment reduced the hyperactivity index score (P<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: In children with ADHD, psychological and behavioral intervention combined with biofeedback treatment can improve the attention concentration and impulsive/hyperactive and hyperactive symptoms. The treatment strategies are slightly different for children with different types of ADHD.

PMID: 30907345 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Pages