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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]
Updated: 36 min 20 sec ago

Startling Differences: Using the Acoustic Startle Response to Study Sex Differences and Neurosteroids in Affective Disorders.

Tue, 2019-06-04 06:31
Related Articles

Startling Differences: Using the Acoustic Startle Response to Study Sex Differences and Neurosteroids in Affective Disorders.

Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2018 05 18;20(6):40

Authors: Hantsoo L, Golden CEM, Kornfield S, Grillon C, Epperson CN

Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Neuroactive steroid hormones, such as estradiol and progesterone, likely play a role in the pathophysiology of female-specific psychiatric disorders such as premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and postpartum depression and may contribute to the marked sex differences observed in the incidence and presentation of affective disorders. However, few tools are available to study the precise contributions of these neuroactive steroids (NSs). In this review, we propose that the acoustic startle response (ASR), an objective measure of an organism's response to an emotional context or stressor, is sensitive to NSs. As such, the ASR represents a unique translational tool that may help to elucidate the contribution of NSs to sex differences in psychiatric disorders.
RECENT FINDINGS: Findings suggest that anxiety-potentiated startle (APS) and prepulse inhibition of startle (PPI) are the most robust ASR paradigms for assessing contribution of NSs to affective disorders, while affective startle response modulation (ASRM) appears less diagnostic of sex or menstrual cycle (MC) effects. However, few studies have appropriately used ASR to test a priori hypotheses about sex or MC differences. We recommend that ASR studies account for sex as a biological variable (SABV) and hormonal status to further knowledge of NS contribution to affective disorders.

PMID: 29777410 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Mind-Body Therapies for Late-Life Mental and Cognitive Health.

Tue, 2019-06-04 06:31
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Mind-Body Therapies for Late-Life Mental and Cognitive Health.

Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2018 01 25;20(1):2

Authors: Laird KT, Paholpak P, Roman M, Rahi B, Lavretsky H

Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: A growing body of research supports the use of mind-body therapies (MBTs) as minimally invasive and effective approaches for the management of late-life mood and cognitive disorders.
RECENT FINDINGS: Recent randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses indicate that MBTs are effective for enhancing well-being, mood, sleep, and cognition in older adults. Evidence suggests that mindful movement (e.g., yoga, tai chi, walking meditation) may even outperform conventional physical exercise with regard to effects on quality of life, mood, and cognitive functioning. Practitioners may recommend MBTs as holistic, effective approaches for the management of common late-life mood and cognitive disorders. Continued research on MBTs will inform the development of even more effective/targeted interventions and contribute to greater acceptance and integration of these therapies into geriatric medicine and psychiatry.

PMID: 29372339 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Burnout-There's an App for That: Helping Physicians Deal With Job-Related Stress.

Tue, 2019-06-04 06:31
Related Articles

Burnout-There's an App for That: Helping Physicians Deal With Job-Related Stress.

JAMA Cardiol. 2017 11 01;2(11):1185-1186

Authors: Holoshitz N, Wann S

PMID: 28614558 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Guided imagery relaxation therapy on preoperative anxiety: a randomized clinical trial.

Mon, 2019-06-03 12:27
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Guided imagery relaxation therapy on preoperative anxiety: a randomized clinical trial.

Rev Lat Am Enfermagem. 2018 Nov 29;26:e3101

Authors: Felix MMDS, Ferreira MBG, Oliveira LF, Barichello E, Pires PDS, Barbosa MH

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the effect of relaxation therapy with guided imagery on state anxiety and cortisol in the immediate preoperative period in patients submitted to bariatric surgery by videolaparoscopy.
METHOD: a randomized, triple-blind clinical trial in a large teaching hospital in the interior of Minas Gerais. Twenty-four patients who would undergo video-laparoscopic bariatric surgery were randomly allocated in two groups, namely 12 in the control group and 12 in the experimental group. State anxiety was assessed by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and blood cortisol levels were measured before and after the intervention or standard care. Descriptive analyzes were used for the quantitative variables and Student's t-test for independent samples, in the analysis of the differences between the state anxiety scores and cortisol levels.
RESULTS: the experimental group presented a statistically significant reduction of the state anxiety scores (p = 0.005) as well as of cortisol levels (p <0.001) after the intervention.
CONCLUSION: guided imagery relaxation therapy is an effective nursing intervention for the reduction of state anxiety and blood cortisol levels in the preoperative period in patients undergoing video-laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: RBR-5qywrf.

PMID: 30517586 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effects of stress management and relaxation training on the relationship between diabetes symptoms and affect among Latinos.

Mon, 2019-06-03 12:27
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Effects of stress management and relaxation training on the relationship between diabetes symptoms and affect among Latinos.

Psychol Health. 2018 09;33(9):1172-1190

Authors: Wagner J, Armeli S, Tennen H, Bermudez-Millan A, Pérez-Escamilla R

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Stress management and relaxation (SMR) interventions can reduce symptoms of chronic disease and associated distress. However, there is little evidence that such interventions disrupt associations between symptoms and affect. This study examined whether SMR dampened the link between symptoms of hyperglycemia and proximal levels of affect. We predicted that during periods of increased hyperglycemia, individuals receiving SMR training, relative to controls, would demonstrate smaller increases in negative affect.
DESIGN: Fifty-five adult Latinos with type 2 diabetes were randomised to either one group session of diabetes education (DE-only; N = 23) or diabetes education plus eight group sessions of SMR (DE + SMR; N = 32). After treatment, participants reported five diabetes symptoms and four affective states twice daily for seven days using a bilingual telephonic system.
RESULTS: Mean age = 57.8 years, mean A1c = 8.4%, and ¾ was female with less than a high school education. Individuals receiving DE + SMR, compared to DE-only, showed a weaker positive within-person association between daily diabetes symptoms and nervous affect. Groups also differed on the association between symptoms and enthusiasm. Age moderated these associations in most models with older individuals showing less affect reactivity to symptoms.
CONCLUSIONS: Findings provide partial support for theorised mechanisms of SMR.

PMID: 29857776 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Neurofeedback: the power of psychosocial therapeutics.

Mon, 2019-06-03 12:27
Related Articles

Neurofeedback: the power of psychosocial therapeutics.

Lancet Psychiatry. 2016 11;3(11):e18

Authors: Thibault RT, Raz A

PMID: 27794377 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The effect of Benson relaxation method on anxiety in the emergency care.

Fri, 2019-05-31 15:19
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The effect of Benson relaxation method on anxiety in the emergency care.

Medicine (Baltimore). 2019 May;98(21):e15452

Authors: Ibrahim A, Koyuncu G, Koyuncu N, Suzer NE, Cakir OD, Karcioglu O

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyze clinical and sociodemographic properties of the patients as measured by the "Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-HADS" including the subscale regarding anxiety (HAD-A) in emergency department (ED) and to detect the effect of a session of Benson relaxation method (BRM) on high anxiety level.
METHODS: Adult patients presented to the state hospital ED in seven days were recruited in this prospective study. Patients with high (≥8) scores were randomized to the treatment or control groups. They were asked to pursue BRM to alleviate anxiety.
RESULTS: Six hundred thirty-four patients were recruited (mean age 44.1 and 52% were female). Patients with acute exacerbation or with psychiatric illness, with a systemic disease and higher acuity level had higher HAD-A scores (P < .05). BRM group had a mean score change higher than controls (7.2 ± 2.9 vs 3.4 ± 2.6, t test, P = .026).
CONCLUSIONS: Patients who underwent BRM had larger decreases in HAD-A scores than others.

PMID: 31124928 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The effect of meditative movement for glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes: A protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trails.

Fri, 2019-05-31 15:19
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The effect of meditative movement for glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes: A protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trails.

Medicine (Baltimore). 2019 May;98(19):e15639

Authors: Xia T, Yang Y, Li W, Tang Z, Li Z, Guo Y

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common and complex chronic disease. A lot of clinical researches have focused on meditative movement for type 2 diabetes. However, there is no systematic review and meta-analysis has been conducted. We aim to systematically review the effect of meditative movement on the type 2 diabetes care.
METHODS: The databases including PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Web of Science, Ovid LWW, EMBASE will be searched. Studies published from the time when the database establishment to December 2018 will be retrieved. RCTs study on meditative movement for glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes will be included. The primary outcomes are HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and postprandial blood glucose (PPBG). RevMan V.5.3 software will be used to perform the analyses.
RESULTS: This study will provide high-quality synthesis of effectiveness and safety of meditation movement for type 2 diabetes.
CONCLUSION: This systematic review will provide high-quality evidence to judge whether the meditative movement is beneficial to glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes.PROSPERO registration number: CRD42019128495.

PMID: 31083263 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effects of electromyographic biofeedback as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of swallowing disorders: a systematic review of the literature.

Fri, 2019-05-31 15:19
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Effects of electromyographic biofeedback as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of swallowing disorders: a systematic review of the literature.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 Apr;276(4):927-938

Authors: Albuquerque LCA, Pernambuco L, da Silva CM, Chateaubriand MM, da Silva HJ

Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the primary effects of electromyographic biofeedback therapy on swallowing via a systematic review.
METHODS: A blind search was carried out by two researchers in the PubMed and Bireme platforms and in the Medline, Lilacs, SciELO, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Web of Science databases, and the journal articles identified therein were evaluated for inclusion in the study. Original articles associated with the theme were selected with no population-, region-, or language-associated limits. A protocol was created for this study with the following points: author, year, place, number and characteristics of participants, activities evaluated, instruments used, and main results. The PEDro scale was used to analyze the quality of the studies.
RESULTS: Among the 686 articles identified in the combined searches, 566 were duplicates. A total of 65 articles were discarded after the title and abstract were read, and a further 29 articles were discarded after the full text was read, yielding a total of six articles for inclusion. In summary, the results lead us to believe that positive effects on the laryngeal lifting capacity, improved swallowing functions, and increased excursion and maximal elevation of the hyoid bone, may be directly related to this method of therapy.
CONCLUSIONS: Adjunctive therapeutic protocols with biofeedback electromyography exert positive effects on swallowing function.

PMID: 30771061 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Film and television tell children who can be scientists.

Fri, 2019-05-31 15:19
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Film and television tell children who can be scientists.

Nature. 2019 01;565(7737):126

Authors: Gewin V

Abstract

PMID: 30568234 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Hypnosis and intensive care nursing, fusion or fiction?]

Fri, 2019-05-31 15:19
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[Hypnosis and intensive care nursing, fusion or fiction?]

Rev Infirm. 2018 Nov;67(245):23-24

Authors: Queralt M, Lamazere C

Abstract
For some time, hypnosis and physical therapy techniques have had the wind in their sails. Numerous media reports extol their benefits for patients. However, in concrete terms, how do these techniques impact on the everyday life of a team and can hypnosis find its place in nursing care in an intensive care unit? This article provides some answers through the experience of a nurse and the work of a whole team.

PMID: 30558775 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Advancing Psychologically Informed Practice for Patients With Persistent Musculoskeletal Pain: Promise, Pitfalls, and Solutions.

Fri, 2019-05-31 15:19
Related Articles

Advancing Psychologically Informed Practice for Patients With Persistent Musculoskeletal Pain: Promise, Pitfalls, and Solutions.

Phys Ther. 2018 05 01;98(5):398-407

Authors: Keefe FJ, Main CJ, George SZ

Abstract
There has been growing interest in psychologically oriented pain management over the past 3 to 4 decades, including a 2011 description of psychologically informed practice (PIP) for low back pain. PIP requires a broader focus than traditional biomechanical and pathology-based approaches that have been traditionally used to manage musculoskeletal pain. A major focus of PIP is addressing the behavioral aspects of pain (ie, peoples' responses to pain) by identifying individual expectations, beliefs, and feelings as prognostic factors for clinical and occupational outcomes indicating progression to chronicity. Since 2011, the interest in PIP seems to be growing, as evidenced by its use in large trials, inclusion in scientific conferences, increasing evidence base, and expansion to other musculoskeletal pain conditions. Primary care physicians and physical therapists have delivered PIP as part of a stratified care approach involving screening and targeting of treatment for people at high risk for continued pain-associated disability. Furthermore, PIP is consistent with recent national priorities emphasizing nonpharmacological pain management options. In this perspective, PIP techniques that range in complexity are described, considerations for implementation in clinical practice are offered, and future directions that will advance the understanding of PIP are outlined.

PMID: 29669084 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Principles behind variance misallocation in temporal exploratory factor analysis for ERP data: Insights from an inter-factor covariance decomposition.

Fri, 2019-05-31 15:19
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Principles behind variance misallocation in temporal exploratory factor analysis for ERP data: Insights from an inter-factor covariance decomposition.

Int J Psychophysiol. 2018 06;128:119-136

Authors: Scharf F, Nestler S

Abstract
Temporal exploratory factor analysis (EFA) is commonly applied to ERP data sets to reduce their dimensionality and the ambiguity with respect to the underlying components. However, the risk of variance misallocation (i.e., the incorrect allocation of condition effects) has raised concerns with regard to EFA usage. Here, we show that variance misallocation occurs because of biased factor covariance estimates and the temporal overlap between the underlying components. We also highlight the consequences of our findings for the analysis of ERP data with EFA. For example, a direct consequence of our expositions is that researchers should use oblique rather than orthogonal rotations, especially when the factors have a substantial topographic overlap. A Monte Carlo simulation confirms our results by showing, for instance, that characteristic biases occur only for orthogonal Varimax rotation but not for oblique rotation methods such as Geomin or Promax. We discuss the practical implications of our results and outline some questions for future research.

PMID: 29621554 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The climate of neurofeedback: scientific rigour and the perils of ideology.

Fri, 2019-05-31 15:19
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The climate of neurofeedback: scientific rigour and the perils of ideology.

Brain. 2018 02 01;141(2):e11

Authors: Thibault RT, Lifshitz M, Raz A

PMID: 29220482 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Neurofeedback: time needed for a promising non-pharmacological therapeutic method.

Fri, 2019-05-31 15:19
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Neurofeedback: time needed for a promising non-pharmacological therapeutic method.

Lancet Psychiatry. 2016 09;3(9):e16

Authors: Micoulaud-Franchi JA, Fovet T

PMID: 27568274 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Rib Fractures.

Thu, 2019-05-30 06:17
Related Articles

Rib Fractures.

JAMA. 2019 05 14;321(18):1836

Authors: Baiu I, Spain D

PMID: 31087024 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Dynamics of fMRI and EEG Parameters in a Stroke Patient Assessed during a Neurofeedback Course Focused on Brodmann Area 4 (M1).

Thu, 2019-05-30 06:17
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Dynamics of fMRI and EEG Parameters in a Stroke Patient Assessed during a Neurofeedback Course Focused on Brodmann Area 4 (M1).

Bull Exp Biol Med. 2019 Jan;166(3):394-398

Authors: Savelov AA, Shtark MB, Mel'nikov ME, Kozlova LI, Bezmaternykh DD, Verevkin EG, Petrovskii ED, Pokrovskii MA, Tsirkin GM, Rudych PD

Abstract
A course of interactive stimulation of primary motor cortex (Brodmann area 4) in the brain of a stroke patient resulted in recovery of locomotion volume in the paretic extremities and in improvement of general health accompanied with diverse changes in cerebral activity. During the training course, the magnitude of response in the visual fields of Brodmann areas 17 and 18 decreased; in parallel, the motor areas were supplemented with other ones such as area 24 (the ventral surface of anterior cingulate gyrus responsible for self-regulation of human brain activity and implicated into synthesis of tactile and special information) in company with Brodmann areas 40, 41, 43, 44, and 45. EEG data showed that neurofeedback sessions persistently increased the θ rhythm power in Brodmann areas 7, 39, 40, and 47, while the corresponding powers progressively decreased during a real motion. Both real motion and its virtual sibling constructed by interactive stimulation via neurofeedback were characterized with decreasing powers of the EEG β rhythm in Brodmann areas 6 and 8. The neurofeedback course decreased the coherence between the left Brodmann area 6 and some other ones examined in α and θ ranges. In the context of real motions, the coherence assessed in the EEG β range generally increased. Overall, the EEG and fMRI parameters attest to growing similarity between the moieties of functional communications effected in real and imaginary movements during neurofeedback course. The data open the vista for interactive stimulation to rehabilitate stroke patients; they highlight the important role of Brodmann areas in rearrangement of the brain in such patients; finally, the present results revealed the "common nervous pathway" that can be used to restore the capability for imaginary and real movements by a neurofeedback course after stroke.

PMID: 30627901 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Prospects of Synchronous fMRI-EEG Recording as the Basis for Neurofeedback (Exemplified on Patient with Stroke Sequelae).

Thu, 2019-05-30 06:17
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Prospects of Synchronous fMRI-EEG Recording as the Basis for Neurofeedback (Exemplified on Patient with Stroke Sequelae).

Bull Exp Biol Med. 2019 Jan;166(3):390-393

Authors: Savelov AA, Shtark MB, Mel'nikov ME, Kozlova LI, Bezmaternykh DD, Verevkin EG, Petrovskii ED, Pokrovskii MA, Tsirkin GM, Rudych PD

Abstract
Synchronous fMRI-EEG mapping of cerebral activity in stroke patients made it possible to implement neurofeedback, a novel and promising therapeutic technology. This method integrates a real-time monitoring of cerebral activity by EEG and fMRI signals and training of the patients to control this activity simultaneously or alternatively via neurofeedback. The targets of such cerebral stimulation are cortical regions controlling arbitrary movements (Brodmann area 4), whereas its aim is optimization of activity in these regions in order to achieve better rehabilitation of stroke patients. The paper discusses the methodical details, advantages, and promise of bimodal neurofeedback treatment.

PMID: 30627899 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Rapid acquisition of dynamic control over DLPFC using real-time fMRI feedback.

Thu, 2019-05-30 06:17
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Rapid acquisition of dynamic control over DLPFC using real-time fMRI feedback.

Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2018 11;28(11):1194-1205

Authors: Van den Boom MA, Jansma JM, Ramsey NF

Abstract
It has been postulated that gaining control over activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), a key region of the working memory brain network, may be beneficial for cognitive performance and treatment of certain psychiatric disorders. Several studies have reported that, with neurofeedback training, subjects can learn to increase DLPFC activity. However, improvement of dynamic control in terms of switching between low and high activity in DLPFC brain states may potentially constitute more effective self-regulation. Here, we report on feasibility of obtaining dynamic control over DLPFC, meaning the ability to both in- and decrease activity at will, within a single functional MRI scan session. Two groups of healthy volunteers (N = 24) were asked to increase and decrease activity in the left DLPFC as often as possible during fMRI scans (at 7 Tesla), while receiving real-time visual feedback. The experimental group practiced with real-time feedback, whereas the control group received sham feedback. The experimental group significantly increased the speed of intentionally alternating DLPFC activity, while performance of the control group did not change. Analysis of the characteristics of the BOLD signal during successful trials revealed that training with neurofeedback predominantly reduced the time for the DLPFC to return to baseline after activation. These results provide a preliminary indication that people may be able to learn to dynamically down-regulate the level of physiological activity in the DLPFC, and may have implications for psychiatric disorders where DLPFC plays a role.

PMID: 30217551 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effects of Sprint-Interval and Endurance Respiratory Muscle Training Regimens.

Thu, 2019-05-30 06:17
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Effects of Sprint-Interval and Endurance Respiratory Muscle Training Regimens.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2019 02;51(2):361-371

Authors: Schaer CE, Wüthrich TU, Beltrami FG, Spengler CM

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Recently a novel, time-saving respiratory muscle sprint-interval training (RMSIT) was developed. To test the extent to which RMSIT improves respiratory muscle performance compared with a conventional respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET), a novel incremental respiratory muscle test (IncRMT), loading inspiratory and expiratory muscles, was designed to assess performance changes associated with respiratory muscle training (RMT).
METHODS: Healthy, moderately trained males and females (age: 26 ± 5 yr, V˙O2peak: 47 ± 12 mL·min·kg) were randomized and balanced to three groups (RMSIT 5m/5f; RMET 6m/6f; PLAT 5m/6f). Lung function, respiratory muscle strength, and IncRMT performance were tested before and after 1 month of RMT. During the IncRMT, muscle activity and muscle deoxygenation were assessed via surface EMG and near-infrared spectroscopy of sternocleidomastoid (STERNO), intercostal (INTER), and abdominal (ABDO) muscles.
RESULTS: Two-way ANOVA revealed a main effect of training for increased maximal voluntary ventilation (P = 0.001) and maximal inspiratory pressure (P = 0.017). Both RMT groups increased work of breathing during training sessions to the same extent (RMSIT: +17.4 ± 8.9 kJ; RMET: +26.2 ± 16.1 kJ; P = 0.143) with a larger increase in average mouth pressure in RMSIT (RMSIT: +20.0 ± 15.0 cm H2O; RMET: +3.3 ± 1.5 cm H2O; P = 0.001). After training, IncRMT duration increased in both RMT groups compared with PLAT (RMSIT: +5.6 ± 2.1 min, P = 0.0006 vs PLAT; RMET: +3.8 ± 4.2 min, P = 0.020 vs PLAT). At similar work, only INTER activity during inspiration increased after RMET. Higher performance after RMSIT was associated with higher activity in STERNO and ABDO, but after RMET, STERNO, INTER, and ABDO showed higher activity.
CONCLUSION: One month of RMSIT and RMET shows similar improvements in respiratory muscle performance despite different duration of training sessions. Also, muscular adaptations might differ.

PMID: 30216239 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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