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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]
Updated: 1 hour 28 min ago

Prevalence, patterns, and predictors of meditation use among U.S. children: Results from the National Health Interview Survey.

Sat, 2019-07-20 07:30
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Prevalence, patterns, and predictors of meditation use among U.S. children: Results from the National Health Interview Survey.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Apr;43:271-276

Authors: Wang C, Li K, Gaylord S

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study is to examine the characteristics of various types of meditation use (i.e., mantra, mindful, and spiritual meditation) among U.S. children.
METHODS: Using 2017 National Health Interview Survey, we examined the prevalence, patterns, and potential predictors of meditation use among U.S. children aged 4 to 17 years. Descriptive statistics, Wald F chi-square test, and multivariable logistic regression were used for data analysis (n = 6925).
RESULTS: Overall meditation use has increased substantially from 1.6% in 2012 to 7.4% in 2017 among children in the US. Children with chronic medical conditions were more likely to use mindful meditation (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 1.9-3.6, 95% CI [1.0-7.4]). Regularly taking prescription medication had an inverse relation with mantra meditation use (AOR = 0.4, 95% CI [0.2-0.9]). Children with delayed medical care due to access difficulties were more likely to use spiritual meditation, compared to those who did not (AOR = 1.7, 95% CI [1.1-2.6]).
CONCLUSIONS: Meditation use has rapidly increased among U.S. children within the past few years. Future studies should explore the underlying reasons for this increase and its potential benefits for pediatric meditators.

PMID: 30935542 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Weekly assessment of number of yoga classes and amount of yoga home practice: Agreement with daily diaries.

Sat, 2019-07-20 07:30
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Weekly assessment of number of yoga classes and amount of yoga home practice: Agreement with daily diaries.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Apr;43:227-231

Authors: Uebelacker LA, Feltus S, Jones R, Tremont GN, Miller IW

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a weekly yoga practice assessment instrument designed to assess number of classes attended in the previous week, number of times engaged in formal home yoga practice, total number of minutes engaged in formal home yoga practice in the past week, and number of times engaged in informal home yoga practice. "Informal" practice was defined as "in the middle of other activities, you spent a few moments engaged in asanas/postures, focus on breath, body awareness, or very brief meditation, for less than 5 min at a time." We assessed agreement between this weekly assessment and a daily home practice log.
DESIGN AND SETTING: Seventy-two community yoga practitioners completed online daily yoga logs for 28 days as well as the weekly yoga practice assessment four times over the 28 day period.
RESULTS: We examined agreement between the two methods on the four indices of amount of weekly yoga practice. We found acceptable agreement between the two methods for number of classes, number of times engaged in formal home practice, and total number of minutes engaged in formal home practice. Agreement was lower for number of times engaged in informal practice.
CONCLUSIONS: These data provide support for use of a weekly yoga practice assessment to assess number of classes attended and amount of formal but not informal home practice.

PMID: 30935535 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The impact of yoga in medically underserved populations: A mixed-methods study.

Sat, 2019-07-20 07:30
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The impact of yoga in medically underserved populations: A mixed-methods study.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Apr;43:201-207

Authors: Moscoso DI, Goese D, Van Hyfte GJ, Mayer Z, Cain L, Kobiernicki F, Cano-Garcia A, Unzueta C, Ormaza LT, Jones K

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the acceptability, access, and impact of yoga among participants in yoga classes co-located in community health centers.
DESIGN: Participants were invited to complete a mixed-methods program evaluation consisting of a pre/post survey at their first class and structured interviews at 4 months.
SETTING: The study took place at two community health centers on the South Side of Chicago, IL, USA.
INTERVENTIONS: Four weekly 1-1.5 hour yoga classes were provided by four certified yoga instructors trained to teach to all ability levels.
MEASURES: Our primary outcome measures were pain and stress before and after the first class, and at 4-months. We gathered data about participant demographics, their health problems, how they accessed the classes, and motivations and barriers to attending. We also extracted themes from participants' qualitative feedback about their experiences.
RESULTS: Overall, 70 participants completed the initial surveys; 44 completed the 4-month interviews. A racially and ethnically diverse group of middle- and low-income adult patients and community members attended, with flyers and word of mouth the major routes to the class. A single yoga class provided statistically significant decreases in pain and stress, but these benefits were not demonstrated at the 4-month follow-up. The primary motivators for yoga class attendance were stress relief, exercise, and overall health improvement. Primary barriers included family issues, schedule, illness, and work conflicts. Primary benefits included physical benefits, relaxation, emotional benefits, and community connectedness.
CONCLUSIONS: Co-locating yoga classes in community health centers provides a variety of benefits and is a viable pathway to addressing disparities in yoga access.

PMID: 30935532 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The effect of exercise, yoga and physiotherapy on the quality of life of people with multiple sclerosis: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

Sat, 2019-07-20 07:30
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The effect of exercise, yoga and physiotherapy on the quality of life of people with multiple sclerosis: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Apr;43:188-195

Authors: Alphonsus KB, Su Y, D'Arcy C

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease affecting the myelinated axons of the central nervous system causing neurological deterioration. People living with MS have a poor quality of life (QOL) because of the symptoms caused by the disease and there are various types of treatments to manage the symptoms aside from medication.
OBJECTIVE: This meta-analysis examines the effect of exercise, yoga and physiotherapy on the physical, mental and social QOL among individuals living with MS.
SETTING: A systematic review with meta-analysis was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Scopus from 1990 to 2017. The standard mean difference scores were computed in each study for the domains of physical, mental and social functioning.
RESULTS: Eighteen studies met the inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis. Aerobic exercise was effective in improving satisfaction with physical functioning,d = 0.35 (95% CI = 0.08 to 0.62), mental functioning d = 0.42 (95% CI = 0.11 to 0.72), and social functioning d = 0.42 (95% CI = 0.15 to 0.69). Physiotherapy was also found to be effective for physical functioning d = 0.50 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.80), mental functioning d = 0.44 (95% CI 0.14 to 0.75) and social functioning d = 0.60 (95% CI 0.21 to 0.90). However yoga and combination of exercises did not have a significant effect on any of the QOL domains.
CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that aerobic exercise and physiotherapy improves the satisfaction of MS patients with their physical, mental and social functioning and may be included as normal practice in the treatment of MS.

PMID: 30935529 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The perceived therapeutic benefits of complementary medicine in eating disorders.

Sat, 2019-07-20 07:30
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The perceived therapeutic benefits of complementary medicine in eating disorders.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Apr;43:176-180

Authors: Foroughi N, Zhu KCY, Smith C, Hay P

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the perception of Complementary Medicines (CMs) in community women; to identify which CM approaches people perceived as the most beneficial; and the impact of Eating Disorder (ED) symptoms on one's perception of treatment.
DESIGN & SETTING: Electronic and paper-based surveys were distributed to a pre-existing cohort of community women (n = 100) aged 18 years and over. The survey included questions about the perception of CMs' benefits in EDs regarding a vignette of a women with Anorexia Nervosa (AN), and whether CMs helped the participant's own personal health.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The mental health literacy of women with regards to the recognition, evidence-based and CM treatment, and outcomes of a fictional person with AN.
RESULTS: Exercise, yoga, meditation, relaxation, vitamins and minerals, massage and creative therapy were perceived as very helpful for someone with AN and for general health. Excluding meditation, there was no significant relationship between the levels of ED symptoms and perceived helpfulness of the therapies. Positive benefits were perceived for the use of CMs for AN.
CONCLUSION: Considering the positive regard for these approaches, empirical studies are required to test their efficacy in the treatment of EDs.

PMID: 30935527 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

How does yoga reduce stress? Embodied cognition and emotion highlight the influence of the musculoskeletal system.

Sat, 2019-07-20 07:30
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How does yoga reduce stress? Embodied cognition and emotion highlight the influence of the musculoskeletal system.

Complement Ther Med. 2019 Apr;43:170-175

Authors: Francis AL, Beemer RC

Abstract
Yoga is an increasingly popular activity, perhaps because of its association with stress reduction and relaxation - an association that is generally supported by empirical evidence. Understanding of the mediating variables is, however, limited. Given that, the purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical perspective that encourages systematic research regarding the relationship between yoga, stress, and musculoskeletal activity. This embodied perspective parallels popular interest in the mind-body connection and emphasizes the influence of body position on thinking as well as emotion. Those influences take on added meaning in the context of the Cognitive Appraisal Theory and the Biopsychosocial Model of Challenge and Threat. Investigations of embodied cognition suggest that yoga may reduce stress by affecting the way individuals appraise stressors. The combination of body position and common components of yoga practice may also contribute to that effect, particularly when considering thoughts about the self and feelings of confidence. Findings regarding embodied emotion make a similar contribution to understanding the implications of previous research findings and common yoga practices. Considering yoga and stress from an embodied perspective also highlights the role of the musculoskeletal system in the stress process, leading to the question of whether yoga influences stress by directly influencing the musculoskeletal system, indirectly by influencing awareness of that system, or through a combination of the two. Those questions, in turn, highlight the importance of expanding investigations of psychological processes, body position, musculoskeletal activity during yoga, and the interactions between those variables.

PMID: 30935526 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Current Approaches for Management of Music Performance Anxiety: An Introductory Overview.

Sat, 2019-07-20 07:30
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Current Approaches for Management of Music Performance Anxiety: An Introductory Overview.

Med Probl Perform Art. 2019 Mar;34(1):53-60

Authors: Zhukov K

Abstract
Music performance anxiety (MPA) is a complex area with many individual factors contributing to the level of anxiety experienced by musicians during live performances. This paper provides an overview of research literature on performance anxiety, intended for music teachers, students, and professional musicians, to highlight strategies that have been suggested to manage the accompanying physical and cognitive symptoms. Treatment of MPA includes mindfulness-based approaches, physiological/physically-based therapies, cognitive/behavioural therapies, prescribed medication, music therapy, and psychotherapy. The most popular approaches for managing the physical symptoms are relaxation techniques, in particular, deep breathing exercises, yoga, and meditation. Other strategies include Alexander technique, bio- and neuro-feedback, healthy lifestyle, and prescription drugs. Self-handicapping and perfectionism are some of the examples of negative behaviours in musicians. Management of cognitive symptoms of MPA includes cognitive restructuring, realistic goal-setting, systematic desensitisation, music therapy, and/or psychotherapy. Combining behavioural techniques with cognitive therapy strategies appears to be the most promising approach among interventions aimed at reducing MPA and improving the quality of music performance. Cautious interpretation of the efficacy of interventions is needed due to methodological weaknesses of some research, and this overview of current approaches is intended to facilitate understanding for those less familiar with this topic.

PMID: 30826822 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Increasing the learning Capacity of BCI Systems via CNN-HMM models.

Sat, 2019-07-20 07:30
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Increasing the learning Capacity of BCI Systems via CNN-HMM models.

Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2018 07;2018:1-4

Authors: Saidutta YM, Zou J, Fekri F

Abstract
Despite all the work in the Brain Computer Interface (BCI) community, one of the main issues that prevents it from becoming pervasive is the limitation on the number of commands with a satisfactory accuracy of detection. In this paper, we propose a solution to increase the number of commands while maintaining a satisfactory accuracy performance via a hybrid Convolutional Neural Network (CNN)- Hidden Markov Model (HMM). The setup makes use of a classifier (a CNN) that works over a small alphabet of established mental tasks like the motor imagery task and detects sequences comprised of these tasks using HMMs. To optimize the learning capacity, we select a subset of sequences by measuring the distance between HMM models. This system, based on the experiments we have conducted, shows a 14% gain in accuracy over the non-sequenced classifier. Alternatively, it can be used to increase the command set size by 4 times when using all the channels or by 1.5 times when using only 1/3 of the EEG channels and have the same performance as a non-sequenced classifier that uses all available channels. This shows that the CNN-HMM hybrid model is a viable approach to increase the capacity of learning in BCI.

PMID: 30440266 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Multifractal Analysis of Speech Imagery of IPA Vowels.

Sat, 2019-07-20 07:30
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Multifractal Analysis of Speech Imagery of IPA Vowels.

Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2018 07;2018:1-4

Authors: Sikdar D, Roy R, Bakshi K, Mahadevappa M

Abstract
In Brain Computer Interfacing (BCI), speech imagery is still at nascent stage of development. There are few studies reported considering mostly vowels or monosyllabic words. However, language specific vowels or words made it harder to standardise the whole analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) while distinguishing between them. Through this study, we have explored significance of multifractal parameters for different imagined vowels chosen from International Phonetic Alphabets (IPA). The vowels were categorised into two categories, namely, soft vowels and diphthongs. Multifractal analysis at EEG subband levels were evaluated. We have also reported significant contrasts between spatiotemporal distributions with fractal analysis for activation of different brain regions in imagining vowels.

PMID: 30440262 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The impact of successful learning of self-regulation on reward processing in children with ADHD using fMRI.

Sat, 2019-07-20 07:30
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The impact of successful learning of self-regulation on reward processing in children with ADHD using fMRI.

Atten Defic Hyperact Disord. 2019 Mar;11(1):31-45

Authors: Baumeister S, Wolf I, Hohmann S, Holz N, Boecker-Schlier R, Banaschewski T, Brandeis D

Abstract
Neurofeedback (NF) is a non-pharmacological treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that is targeting self-regulation, is efficacious when standard protocols are used and induces partly specific neurophysiological changes in the inhibitory network. However, its effects on reward processing, which is also considered an important aspect of ADHD and has been linked to neurophysiological deficits, remain unknown. Children with ADHD (N = 15, mean age 11.8, SD 1.52) were randomly assigned to either slow cortical potential NF (n = 8) or EMG biofeedback control training (n = 7) and received 20 sessions of training under comparable conditions. Learning was defined as the slope of successful training runs across all transfer sessions. Whole brain analysis, region-of-interest analysis of anticipatory ventral striatal (VS) activation, and analysis of behavioral data were performed. Clinically, the NF group improved more than the EMG group. Whole brain analysis indicated increased activation in the left superior frontal gyrus in the control group only, and in medial prefrontal cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal gyrus (DLPFC) after treatment across all groups. Only successful learners of self-regulation (n = 8) showed increased left inferior frontal gyrus and DLPFC activation after treatment. Left VS activation was increased after treatment and showed a significant time*medication-status interaction. Specific treatment effects were found in left frontal regions for the control treatment and successful learners. Also, unmedicated participants, irrespective of treatment type or successful learning, showed treatment-induced improvement in reward processing. The results suggest no prominent specific effect of NF on reward processing. However, cautious interpretation is warranted due to the small sample.

PMID: 30225805 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Evaluation of a communication skills training course for medical students using peer role-play.

Sat, 2019-07-20 07:30
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Evaluation of a communication skills training course for medical students using peer role-play.

J Pak Med Assoc. 2017 May;67(5):745-751

Authors: Ayuob NN, Qadi MA, El Deek BS, Boker AM

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of using peer role-playing in learning the communication skills as a step in the development of the communication skills training course delivered to pre-clinical medical students.
METHODS: This study was conducted at the King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between September 2014 and February 2015 and comprised medical students. Mixed methods design was used to evaluate the developed communication skills training course. Tests were conducted before and after the communication skills training course to assess the students' self-reported communication. After the course, the students completed a satisfaction survey. Focus groups were conducted to assess the behavioural and organisational changes induced by the course. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis..
RESULTS: Of the293 respondents, 246(84%) were satisfied with the course. Overall, 169(58%) subjects chose the lectures as the most helpful methods for learning the communication skills while 124(42%) considered practical sessions as the most helpful method. Besides, 237(81%) respondents reported that the role-play was beneficial for their learning, while 219(75%) perceived the video-taped role-play as an appropriate method for assessing the communication skills.
CONCLUSIONS: Peer role-play was found to be a feasible and well-perceived alternative method in facilitating the acquisition of communication skills..

PMID: 28507364 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Eye-gaze contingent attention training (ECAT): Examining the causal role of attention regulation in reappraisal and rumination.

Fri, 2019-07-19 07:29
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Eye-gaze contingent attention training (ECAT): Examining the causal role of attention regulation in reappraisal and rumination.

Biol Psychol. 2019 03;142:116-125

Authors: Sanchez-Lopez A, Everaert J, Van Put J, De Raedt R, Koster EHW

Abstract
This study used a novel eye-gaze contingent attention training (ECAT) to test the prediction that attention regulation is involved in reappraisal and rumination. Sixty-six undergraduates were randomly assigned to either the control or the active training condition of the ECAT. Active ECAT comprised training in allocating attention toward positive words to efficiently create positive interpretations while receiving gaze-contingent feedback. Participants in the control condition freely generated interpretations without receiving gaze-contingent feedback. Active ECAT resulted in: 1) more sustained attention on positive information, in turn predicting greater reappraisal success to down-regulate negative emotions, and 2) larger reductions in state rumination after viewing negative scenes. Our results highlight the importance of considering attention mechanisms in understanding (and treating impaired) emotion regulation processes. These findings provide an important step towards the use of personalized attention training to build resources of resilience.

PMID: 30735680 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Effect of modified Buzhong Yiqi decoction combined with pelvic floor muscle exercise-biofeedback-electrical stimulation on early stage postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction].

Fri, 2019-07-19 07:29
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[Effect of modified Buzhong Yiqi decoction combined with pelvic floor muscle exercise-biofeedback-electrical stimulation on early stage postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction].

Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi. 2018 Jun;43(11):2391-2395

Authors: Chen Z, Huang H, Chen QY

Abstract
To investigate the curative effect of modified Buzhong Yiqi decoction combined with pelvic floor muscle exercise-biofeedback-electrostimulation on early postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction disease (PFD) and its effect on the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF-β1), matrix metalloprotein (MMP-2), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-2). A total of 186 PFD patients admitted to our hospital from March 2014 to December 2016 were selected in the study and were randomly divided into test group (n=93) and control group (n=93). The control group received pelvic floor muscle exercises-biofeedback-electrostimulation, while the test group was additionally treated with modified Buzhong Yiqi decoction based on the treatment in control group. Then the clinical efficacy was compared between two groups. The results showed that vaginal contractile electromyography (EMG), duration of vaginal constriction, dynamic vaginal pressure and pelvic floor myoelectric activity in the test group at 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment were significantly higher than those before treatment and the control group (P<0.05). The effective rate for urinary incontinence was 97.14% in test group, significantly higher than 75.68% in the control group (P<0.05). The effective rate for improvement of sexual life quality was 96.43% in test group, significantly higher than 74.07% in control group (P<0.05). 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment, the uterine prolapse, posterior wall prolapse and anterior wall prolapse grade in test group was slightly lower than that in the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant. After treatment, the levels of TGF-β1 and TIMP-2 in the test group were higher than those in the control group, while the levels of MMP-2 were lower than those in the control group (P<0.05). The results showed that modified Buzhong Yiqi decoction combined with pelvic floor muscle exercise-biofeedback-electrostimulation can effectively relieve the clinical symptoms, promote the body recovery and improve the quality of sexual life in PFD patients, with remarkable advantages, so it is worthy of popularizing.

PMID: 29945396 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Cerebrovascular Hemodynamics During the Practice of Bhramari Pranayama, Kapalbhati and Bahir-Kumbhaka: An Exploratory Study.

Fri, 2019-07-19 07:29
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Cerebrovascular Hemodynamics During the Practice of Bhramari Pranayama, Kapalbhati and Bahir-Kumbhaka: An Exploratory Study.

Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback. 2018 03;43(1):87-92

Authors: Nivethitha L, Mooventhan A, Manjunath NK, Bathala L, Sharma VK

Abstract
Various pranayama techniques are known to produce different physiological effects. We evaluated the effect of three-different pranayama techniques on cerebrovascular hemodynamics. Eighteen healthy volunteers with the mean ± standard deviation age of 23.78 ± 2.96 years were performed three-different pranayama techniques: (1) Bhramari, (2) Kapalbhati and (3) Bahir-Kumbhaka in three-different orders. Continuous transcranial Doppler (TCD) monitoring was performed before, during and after the pranayama techniques. TCD parameters such as peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity (EDV), mean flow velocity (MFV) and pulsatility index (PI) of right middle cerebral artery were recorded. Practice of Kapalbhati showed significant reductions in EDV and MFV with significant increase in PI while, Bahir-Kumbhaka showed significant increase in EDV and MFV with significant reduction in PI. However, no such significant changes were observed in Bhramari pranayama. Various types of pranayama techniques produce different cerebrovascular hemodynamic changes in healthy volunteers.

PMID: 29188396 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Does Not Substitute for Asthma Steroid Controller Medication.

Fri, 2019-07-19 07:29
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Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Does Not Substitute for Asthma Steroid Controller Medication.

Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback. 2018 03;43(1):57-73

Authors: Lehrer PM, Irvin CG, Lu SE, Scardella A, Roehmheld-Hamm B, Aviles-Velez M, Graves J, Vaschillo EG, Vaschillo B, Hoyte F, Nelson H, Wamboldt FS

Abstract
Despite previous findings of therapeutic effects for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) on asthma, it is not known whether HRVB can substitute either for controller or rescue medication, or whether it affects airway inflammation. Sixty-eight paid volunteer steroid naïve study participants with mild or moderate asthma were given 3 months of HRVB or a comparison condition consisting of EEG alpha biofeedback with relaxing music and relaxed paced breathing (EEG+), in a two-center trial. All participants received a month of intensive asthma education prior to randomization. Both treatment conditions produced similar significant improvements on the methacholine challenge test (MCT), asthma symptoms, and asthma quality of life (AQOL). MCT effects were of similar size to those of enhanced placebo procedures reported elsewhere, and were 65% of those of a course of a high-potency inhaled steroid budesonide given to a sub-group of participants following biofeedback training. Exhaled nitric oxide decreased significantly only in the HRVB group, 81% of the budesonide effect, but with no significant differences between groups. Participants reported becoming more relaxed during practice of both techniques. Administration of albuterol after biofeedback sessions produced a large improvement in pulmonary function test results, indicating that neither treatment normalized pulmonary function as a potent controller medication would have done. Impulse oscillometry showed increased upper airway (vocal cord) resistance during biofeedback periods in both groups. These data suggest that HRVB should not be considered an alternative to asthma controller medications (e.g., inhaled steroids), although both biofeedback conditions produced some beneficial effects, warranting further research, and suggesting potential complementary effects. Various hypotheses are presented to explain why HRVB effects on asthma appeared smaller in this study than in earlier studies. Clinical Trial Registration NCT02766374.

PMID: 29124506 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

No Effects of Successful Bidirectional SMR Feedback Training on Objective and Subjective Sleep in Healthy Subjects.

Fri, 2019-07-19 07:29
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No Effects of Successful Bidirectional SMR Feedback Training on Objective and Subjective Sleep in Healthy Subjects.

Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback. 2018 03;43(1):37-47

Authors: Binsch O, Wilschut ES, Arns M, Bottenheft C, Valk PJL, Vermetten EHGJM

Abstract
There is a growing interest in the application of psychophysiological signals in more applied settings. Unidirectional sensory motor rhythm-training (SMR) has demonstrated consistent effects on sleep. In this study the main aim was to analyze to what extent participants could gain voluntary control over sleep-related parameters and secondarily to assess possible influences of this training on sleep metrics. Bidirectional training of SMR as well as heart rate variability (HRV) was used to assess the feasibility of training these parameters as possible brain computer interfaces (BCI) signals, and assess effects normally associated with unidirectional SMR training such as the influence on objective and subjective sleep parameters. Participants (n = 26) received between 11 and 21 training sessions during 7 weeks in which they received feedback on their personalized threshold for either SMR or HRV activity, for both up- and down regulation. During a pre- and post-test a sleep log was kept and participants used a wrist actigraph. Participants were asked to take an afternoon nap on the first day at the testing facility. During napping, sleep spindles were assessed as well as self-reported sleep measures of the nap. Although the training demonstrated successful learning to increase and decrease SMR and HRV activity, no effects were found of bidirectional training on sleep spindles, actigraphy, sleep diaries, and self-reported sleep quality. As such it is concluded that bidirectional SMR and HRV training can be safely used as a BCI and participants were able to improve their control over physiological signals with bidirectional training, whereas the application of bidirectional SMR and HRV training did not lead to significant changes of sleep quality in this healthy population.

PMID: 29090400 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The Impact of Different Visual Feedbacks in User Training on Motor Imagery Control in BCI.

Fri, 2019-07-19 07:29
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The Impact of Different Visual Feedbacks in User Training on Motor Imagery Control in BCI.

Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback. 2018 03;43(1):23-35

Authors: Zapała D, Francuz P, Zapała E, Kopiś N, Wierzgała P, Augustynowicz P, Majkowski A, Kołodziej M

Abstract
The challenges of research into brain-computer interfaces (BCI) include significant individual differences in learning pace and in the effective operation of BCI devices. The use of neurofeedback training is a popular method of improving the effectiveness BCI operation. The purpose of the present study was to determine to what extent it is possible to improve the effectiveness of operation of sensorimotor rhythm-based brain-computer interfaces (SMR-BCI) by supplementing user training with elements modifying the characteristics of visual feedback. Four experimental groups had training designed to reinforce BCI control by: visual feedback in the form of dummy faces expressing emotions (Group 1); flashing the principal elements of visual feedback (Group 2) and giving both visual feedbacks in one condition (Group 3). The fourth group participated in training with no modifications (Group 4). Training consisted of a series of trials where the subjects directed a ball into a basket located to the right or left side of the screen. In Group 1 a schematic image a face, placed on the controlled object, showed various emotions, depending on the accuracy of control. In Group 2, the cue and targets were flashed with different frequency (4 Hz) than the remaining elements visible on the monitor. Both modifications were also used simultaneously in Group 3. SMR activity during the task was recorded before and after the training. In Group 3 there was a significant improvement in SMR control, compared to subjects in Group 2 and 4 (control). Differences between subjects in Groups 1, 2 and 4 (control) were insignificant. This means that relatively small changes in the training procedure may significantly impact the effectiveness of BCI control. Analysis of behavioural data acquired from all participants at training showed greater effectiveness in directing the object towards the right side of the screen. Subjects with the greatest improvement in SMR control showed a significantly lower difference in the accuracy of rightward and leftward movement than others.

PMID: 29075937 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Using EEG Frontal Asymmetry to Predict IT User's Perceptions Regarding Usefulness, Ease of Use and Playfulness.

Fri, 2019-07-19 07:29
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Using EEG Frontal Asymmetry to Predict IT User's Perceptions Regarding Usefulness, Ease of Use and Playfulness.

Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback. 2018 03;43(1):1-11

Authors: Moridis CN, Terzis V, Economides AA, Karlovasitou A, Karabatakis VE

Abstract
Information systems (IS) community is increasingly interested in employing neuroscience tools and methods in order to develop new theories concerning Human-computer interaction (HCI) and further understand IS acceptance models. The new field of NeuroIS has been introduced to address these issues. NeuroIS researchers have proposed encephalography (EEG), among other neuroscience instruments, as a valuable usability metric, when used effectively in appropriately designed experiments. Moreover, numerous researchers have suggested that EEG frontal asymmetry may serve as an important metric of user experience. Based on the aforementioned evidence, this study aims to integrate frontal asymmetry with Technology acceptance model (TAM). Particularly, we assumed that frontal asymmetry might predict users' perceptions regarding Usefulness and Ease of Use. Furthermore, we hypothesized that frontal asymmetry might also affect (influence) users' Perceived Playfulness. Specifically, 82 (43 females and 39 males) undergraduate students were chosen to use a Computer-Based Assessment (while being connected to the EEG) in the context of an introductory informatics course. Results confirmed our hypothesis as well as points of theory about Information technology (IT) acceptance variables. This is one of the first studies to suggest that frontal asymmetry could serve as a valuable tool for examining IT acceptance constructs and better understanding HCI.

PMID: 28871504 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The Effect of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Training on Mental Health of Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Thu, 2019-07-18 07:26
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The Effect of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Training on Mental Health of Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 03 23;16(6):

Authors: van der Zwan JE, Huizink AC, Lehrer PM, Koot HM, de Vente W

Abstract
In this study, we examined the efficacy of heart rate variability (HRV)-biofeedback on stress and stress-related mental health problems in women. Furthermore, we examined whether the efficacy differed between pregnant and non-pregnant women. Fifty women (20 pregnant, 30 non-pregnant; mean age 31.6, SD = 5.9) were randomized into an intervention (n = 29) or a waitlist condition (n = 21). All participants completed questionnaires on stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, sleep, and psychological well-being on three occasions with 6-week intervals. Women in the intervention condition received HRV-biofeedback training between assessment 1 and 2, and women in the waitlist condition received the intervention between assessment 2 and 3. The intervention consisted of a 5-week HRV-biofeedback training program with weekly 60⁻90 min. sessions and daily exercises at home. Results indicated a statistically significant beneficial effect of HRV-biofeedback on psychological well-being for all women, and an additional statistically significant beneficial effect on anxiety complaints for pregnant women. No significant effect was found for the other stress-related complaints. These findings support the use of HRV-biofeedback as a stress-reducing technique among women reporting stress and related complaints in clinical practice to improve their well-being. Furthermore, it supports the use of this technique for reducing anxiety during pregnancy.

PMID: 30909539 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

WaveCSP: a robust motor imagery classifier for consumer EEG devices.

Thu, 2019-07-18 07:26
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WaveCSP: a robust motor imagery classifier for consumer EEG devices.

Australas Phys Eng Sci Med. 2019 Mar;42(1):159-168

Authors: Athif M, Ren H

Abstract
There is an increasing demand for reliable motor imagery (MI) classification algorithms for applications in consumer level brain-computer interfacing (BCI). For the practical use, such algorithms must be robust to both device limitations and subject variability, which make MI classification a challenging task. This study proposes methods to study the effect of limitations including a limited number of electrodes, limited spatial distribution of electrodes, lower signal quality, subject variabilities and BCI literacy, on the performance of MI classification. To mitigate these limitations, we propose a machine learning approach, WaveCSP that uses 24 features extracted from EEG signals using wavelet transform and common spatial pattern (CSP) filtering techniques. The algorithm shows better performance in terms of subject variability compared to existing work. The application of WaveCSP to Physionet MI database shows more than 50% of the 109 subjects achieving accuracy higher than 64%. The data obtained from a commercial EEG headset using the same experimental protocol result in up to four out of five subjects who had prior BCI experience (out of a total of 25 subjects) performing with accuracy higher than 64%.

PMID: 30671723 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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