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Mind Body Medicine

Analyzing Social Media Imagery for Health Messages.

Mind-Body Medicine - Sat, 2019-06-15 07:03
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Analyzing Social Media Imagery for Health Messages.

J Nurs Educ. 2018 Mar 01;57(3):191-192

Authors: Groller KD

PMID: 29505083 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Culturally Competent Communication: Building a Culture of Safety Through Online Role-Playing.

Mind-Body Medicine - Sat, 2019-06-15 07:03
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Culturally Competent Communication: Building a Culture of Safety Through Online Role-Playing.

J Nurs Educ. 2018 Feb 01;57(2):128

Authors: Townsend BA

PMID: 29384578 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]; +40 new citations

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-06-14 10:01

40 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]

These pubmed results were generated on 2019/06/14

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Medical Professionals' Review of YouTube Videos Pertaining to Exercises for the Constipation Relief.

Mind-Body Medicine - Sat, 2019-06-08 06:43
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Medical Professionals' Review of YouTube Videos Pertaining to Exercises for the Constipation Relief.

Korean J Gastroenterol. 2018 Dec 25;72(6):295-303

Authors: Lee TH, Kim SE, Park KS, Shin JE, Park SY, Ryu HS, Kim JW, Lee YJ, Cho YS, Park S, Constipation Research Group of The Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility

Abstract
Background/Aims: The primary aims of this study were to evaluate the content quality of YouTube videos on exercises to help relieve constipation and to assess whether the video source, exercise types, and popularity affected their quality.
Methods: Eight gastroenterologists independently evaluated the exercises presented in the constipation YouTube videos for seven items: image quality, usefulness in relieving constipation (quality 1), usefulness for general physical health (quality 2), difficulty in following, activity intensity, fun, and overall quality. Raters were asked open-ended questions to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the videos. Five-point ordinal scales were used to score each item aforementioned, with the exception of image quality and overall quality that used a six-point Likert scale.
Results: The 20 videos had a mean length of 268 seconds and a mean viewership of 32,694. The most common video source was commercial (n=10), and the most common type of physical activity was yoga (n=11). The median values of image quality, quality 1, quality 2, difficulty in following, activity intensity, fun, and overall quality were 3, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, and 2, respectively. Yoga videos had significantly higher median quality 1 values (3) compared with massage videos (2, adjusted p=0.006) and 'others' videos (2, adjusted p<0.001). A lack of medical evidence was the most common answer to open-ended questions about the weaknesses of each video.
Conclusions: Overall, YouTube exercise videos presented a low-quality content. This study highlights the need for evidence-based comprehensive educational videos addressing exercises for treating constipation.

PMID: 30642148 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Shoe-mounted accelerometers should be used with caution in gait retraining.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-06-07 12:41
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Shoe-mounted accelerometers should be used with caution in gait retraining.

Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Jun;29(6):835-842

Authors: Cheung RTH, Zhang JH, Chan ZYS, An WW, Au IPH, MacPhail A, Davis IS

Abstract
Real-time biofeedback gait retraining has been reported to be an effective intervention to lower the impact loading during gait. While many of the previous gait retraining studies have utilized a laboratory-based setup, some studies used accelerometers affixed at the distal tibia to allow training outside the laboratory environment. However, many commercial sensors for gait modification are shoe-mounted. Hence, this study sought to compare impact loading parameters measured by shoe-mounted and tibia sensors in participants before and after a course of walking or running retraining using signal source from the shoe-mounted sensors. We also compared the correlations between peak positive acceleration measured at shoe (PPAS ) and tibia (PPAT ) and vertical loading rates, as these loading rates have been related to injury. Twenty-four and 14 participants underwent a 2-week visual biofeedback walking and running retraining, respectively. Participants in the walking retraining group experienced lower PPAS following the intervention (P < 0.005). However, they demonstrated no change in PPAT (P = 0.409) nor vertical loading rates (P > 0.098) following the walking retraining. In contrast, participants in the running retraining group experienced a reduction in the PPAT (P = 0.001) and vertical loading rates (P < 0.013) after running retraining. PPAS values were four times that of PPAT for both walking and running suggesting an uncoupling of the shoe with tibia. As such, PPAS was not correlated with vertical loading rates for either walking or running, while significant correlations between PPAT and vertical loading rates were noted. The present study suggests potential limitations of the existing commercial shoe-mounted sensors.

PMID: 30693580 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Current state of the use of neuroimaging techniques to understand and alter appetite control in humans.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-06-07 12:41
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Current state of the use of neuroimaging techniques to understand and alter appetite control in humans.

Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2018 09;21(5):329-335

Authors: Spetter MS

Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: It is in the brain where the decision is made what and how much to eat. In the last decades neuroimaging research has contributed extensively to new knowledge about appetite control by revealing the underlying brain processes. Interestingly, there is the fast growing idea of using these methods to develop new treatments for obesity and eating disorders. In this review, we summarize the findings of the importance of the use of neuropharmacology and neuroimaging techniques in understanding and modifying appetite control.
RECENT FINDINGS: Appetite control is a complex interplay between homeostatic, hedonic, and cognitive processes. Administration of the neuropeptides insulin and oxytocin curb food intake and alter brain responses in reward and cognitive control areas. Additionally, these areas can be targeted for neuromodulation or neurofeedback to reduce food cravings and increase self-control to alter food intake.
SUMMARY: The recent findings reveal the potential of intranasal administration of hormones or modifying appetite control brain networks to reduce food consumption in volunteers with overweight and obesity or individuals with an eating disorder. Although long-term clinical studies are still needed.

PMID: 29927764 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Essentials of essential oils.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-06-07 12:41
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Essentials of essential oils.

Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2017 May 01;74(9):e153-e162

Authors: Manion CR, Widder RM

Abstract
PURPOSE: Information to guide clinicians in educating and advising patients using or intending to use essential oils for self-administered aromatherapy or other medicinal purposes is presented.
SUMMARY: The term essential oils refers to highly concentrated, aromatic oils extracted from plants by steam distillation, hydrodiffusion, or pressure. Market reports indicate strong growth in the use of essential oils in the United States in recent decades. Therapeutic claims made in the marketing of essential oils have led the Food and Drug Administration to caution a number of suppliers. Along with rapid growth in sales of essential oils to consumers there has been an increase in the amount of published evidence regarding aromatherapy and essential oils; the annual number of relevant articles indexed using Medical Subject Headings terminology has doubled since 2004. In order to help ensure proper application and safe use of essential oils as a self-care modality, healthcare professionals can benefit from a general knowledge of the terminology and foundational concepts of medicinal use of essential oils, as well as resources to facilitate evaluations of appropriateness of use.
CONCLUSION: Because of the increasing popularity of essential oils and the prevalence of essential oil-based self-care practices targeting a wide variety of ailments in the United States, healthcare professionals must be prepared to address concerns about the agents' safety and efficacy. Proper literature evaluation requires the ability to discern the quality of an oil, the safety of administration, and the validity of its use.

PMID: 28438819 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Using real-time fMRI neurofeedback to restore right occipital cortex activity in patients with left visuo-spatial neglect: proof-of-principle and preliminary results.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-06-07 12:41
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Using real-time fMRI neurofeedback to restore right occipital cortex activity in patients with left visuo-spatial neglect: proof-of-principle and preliminary results.

Neuropsychol Rehabil. 2019 Apr;29(3):339-360

Authors: Robineau F, Saj A, Neveu R, Van De Ville D, Scharnowski F, Vuilleumier P

Abstract
Hemineglect is common after right parietal stroke, characterised by impaired awareness for stimuli in left visual space, with suppressed neural activity in the right visual cortex due to losses in top-down attention signals. Here we sought to assess whether hemineglect patients are able to up-regulate their right visual cortex activity using auditory real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback. We also examined any effect of this training procedure on neglect severity. Two different neurofeedback methods were used. A first group of six patients was trained to up-regulate their right visual cortex activity and a second group of three patients was trained to control interhemispheric balance between their right and left visual cortices. Over three sessions, we found that the first group successfully learned to control visual cortex activity and showed mild reduction in neglect severity, whereas the second group failed to control the feedback and showed no benefit. Whole brain analysis further indicated that successful up-regulation was associated with a recruitment of bilateral fronto-parietal areas. These findings provide a proof of concept that rt-fMRI neurofeedback may offer a new approach to the rehabilitation of hemineglect symptoms, but further studies are needed to identify effective regulation protocols and determine any reliable impact on clinical symptoms.

PMID: 28385053 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions-Reply.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
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Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions-Reply.

JAMA. 2019 05 21;321(19):1939

Authors: Wallis CJD, Detsky AS, Fan E

PMID: 31112256 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
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Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions.

JAMA. 2019 05 21;321(19):1938

Authors: Dewar B, Shamy M

PMID: 31112251 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
Related Articles

Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions.

JAMA. 2019 05 21;321(19):1937-1938

Authors: Sharma S, Traeger AC, Harris I

PMID: 31112250 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Psychological Treatments for IBS in Gastroenterology Settings: Promising but in Need of Further Study.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
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A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Psychological Treatments for IBS in Gastroenterology Settings: Promising but in Need of Further Study.

Dig Dis Sci. 2018 09;63(9):2189-2201

Authors: Thakur ER, Shapiro J, Chan J, Lumley MA, Cully JA, Bradford A, El-Serag HB

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Psychological treatments are efficacious for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in clinical trials; however, their effectiveness when conducted in gastroenterology practice settings is unclear.
AIM: To perform a systematic review of the types and effects of psychological treatments for IBS conducted in gastroenterology clinics.
METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane central register. Studies conducted in gastroenterology clinic settings with IBS patients who were clinically referred from gastroenterology were included.
RESULTS: We identified 3078 citations, of which only eight studies were eligible. Seven studies compared psychological treatments (average n = 25.7; range 12-43) to controls (average n = 25.4 patients; range 12-47), whereas one study compared two active "bonafide" interventions. Psychological treatments varied (cognitive-behavioral therapy, guided affective imagery, mindfulness, hypnosis, biofeedback, emotional awareness training). However, across approaches, short-term benefits were seen. IBS symptoms improved significantly among patients in cognitive and behavioral therapies, mindfulness-based stress reduction, guided affective imagery, and emotional awareness training compared with controls; there was a similar trend for gut-directed hypnotherapy. Similarly, IBS symptoms improved in a study of two active biofeedback and hypnosis treatments.
CONCLUSIONS: Evidence for the effectiveness of psychological treatment in gastroenterology practice is promising but limited. Study designs that involve a blending of efficacy and effectiveness components are needed.

PMID: 29744772 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Effects of appraisal training on responses to a distressing autobiographical event.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
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Effects of appraisal training on responses to a distressing autobiographical event.

J Anxiety Disord. 2018 05;56:26-34

Authors: Woud ML, Zlomuzica A, Cwik JC, Margraf J, Shkreli L, Blackwell SE, Gladwin TE, Ehring T

Abstract
Dysfunctional appraisals are a key factor suggested to be involved in the development and maintenance of PTSD. Research has shown that experimental induction of a positive or negative appraisal style following a laboratory stressor affects analogue posttraumatic stress symptoms. This supports a causal role of appraisal in the development of traumatic stress symptoms and the therapeutic promise of modifying appraisals to reduce PTSD symptoms. The present study aimed to extend previous findings by investigating the effects of experimentally induced appraisals on reactions to a naturally occurring analogue trauma and by examining effects on both explicit and implicit appraisals. Participants who had experienced a distressing life event were asked to imagine themselves in the most distressing moment of that event and then received either a positive or negative Cognitive Bias Modification training targeting appraisals (CBM-App). The CBM-App training induced training-congruent appraisals, but group differences in changes in appraisal over training were only seen for explicit and not implicit appraisals. However, participants trained positively reported less intrusion distress over the subsequent week than those trained negatively, and lower levels of overall posttraumatic stress symptoms. These data support the causal relationship between appraisals and trauma distress, and further illuminate the mechanisms linking the two.

PMID: 29699842 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Changing disgust through imagery rescripting and cognitive reappraisal in contamination-based obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
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Changing disgust through imagery rescripting and cognitive reappraisal in contamination-based obsessive-compulsive disorder.

J Anxiety Disord. 2018 03;54:36-48

Authors: Fink J, Pflugradt E, Stierle C, Exner C

Abstract
Contamination-related obsessive-compulsive disorder (C-OCD) is characterized by strongly experienced disgust and fear, in response to potentially contaminating stimuli. Both emotions differ in their susceptibility for change by habituation and extinction, which are important processes for the success of exposure therapy. Even though the response rates for exposure therapy for C-OCD are very good, it seems promising to test additional therapeutic techniques which target disgust more directly. Therefore, imagery rescripting and cognitive reappraisal were evaluated for their potential to change levels of disgust (within-subject), in the two-session laboratory study with 30 participants, with diagnosed C-OCD, and 30 matched, healthy controls (between-subject), presented. The results show that both emotion-regulation strategies reduced disgust better than a non-intervention control task (counting fishes), across all the participants. Therefore, both strategies seem to be applicable and effective for reducing disgust, in the short term, in participants with diagnosed C-OCD. The implications of these findings for the experimental approach and for the clinical treatment of C-OCD, are discussed.

PMID: 29421371 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Reduced age-associated brain changes in expert meditators: a multimodal neuroimaging pilot study.

Mind-Body Medicine - Wed, 2019-06-05 06:33
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Reduced age-associated brain changes in expert meditators: a multimodal neuroimaging pilot study.

Sci Rep. 2017 08 31;7(1):10160

Authors: Chételat G, Mézenge F, Tomadesso C, Landeau B, Arenaza-Urquijo E, Rauchs G, André C, de Flores R, Egret S, Gonneaud J, Poisnel G, Chocat A, Quillard A, Desgranges B, Bloch JG, Ricard M, Lutz A

Abstract
Aging is associated with progressive cerebral volume and glucose metabolism decreases. Conditions such as stress and sleep difficulties exacerbate these changes and are risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Meditation practice, aiming towards stress reduction and emotion regulation, can downregulate these adverse factors. In this pilot study, we explored the possibility that lifelong meditation practice might reduce age-related brain changes by comparing structural MRI and FDG-PET data in 6 elderly expert meditators versus 67 elderly controls. We found increased gray matter volume and/or FDG metabolism in elderly expert meditators compared to controls in the bilateral ventromedial prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex, insula, temporo-parietal junction, and posterior cingulate cortex /precuneus. Most of these regions were also those exhibiting the strongest effects of age when assessed in a cohort of 186 controls aged 20 to 87 years. Moreover, complementary analyses showed that these changes were still observed when adjusting for lifestyle factors or using a smaller group of controls matched for education. Pending replication in a larger cohort of elderly expert meditators and longitudinal studies, these findings suggest that meditation practice could reduce age-associated structural and functional brain changes.

PMID: 28860449 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Brain education-based meditation for patients with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

Mind-Body Medicine - Tue, 2019-06-04 06:31
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Brain education-based meditation for patients with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

Medicine (Baltimore). 2019 May;98(19):e15574

Authors: Lee SH, Hwang SM, Kang DH, Yang HJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hypertension and type 2 diabetes are chronic diseases, which generally require lifetime care. Meditation and yoga can be complementary to pharmacological therapies according to the scientific evidences so far. Brain education-based meditation (BEM) is a technique, which has been known to change brain structure, psychology, and physiology of healthy adult participants. This randomized, nonblinded pilot trial aimed to examine whether BEM affects the conditions of patients with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes compared with health education classes.
METHODS: We randomly allocated 48 patients with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes to BEM (n = 24) or health education (n = 24) classes in the Ulsan Junggu Public Health Center in Korea, where the classes were run during the same period and explored the impact of 8-week practice on the serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase, creatinine, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Total RNA was extracted to examine inflammatory gene expressions from the whole blood using PAXgene blood RNA System. In addition, self-reports on mental/physical health were evaluated. The Student's t test, chi-squared test, and analysis of covariance were used for statistical analysis.
RESULTS: The number of people who participated until the completion of the study was 14 in the control and 21 in the BEM group. After 8 weeks, LDL cholesterol level was significantly decreased in the BEM group after the intervention (13.82 mg/dL reduction, P < .05), while it was not significantly altered in the control group. The expression of inflammatory genes was significantly reduced after 8 weeks of the BEM training (0.3-, 0.5-, and 0.2-fold change for NFKB2, RELA, and IL1B, respectively, all P < .05). In the item analysis of mental/physical health self-reports, a significant improvement was confirmed as follows: increases in focus, confidence, relaxation, and happiness; decreases in fatigue, anger, and loneliness (all P < .05). There were no important adverse events or side-effects by BEM intervention.
CONCLUSION: Compared to health education, BEM helps lower LDL cholesterol level and the inflammatory gene expression in the patients with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes. Moreover, BEM induces positive effects on the self-reported mental/physical states, warranting further study.

PMID: 31083232 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Improving neuropsychiatric symptoms following stroke using virtual reality: A case report.

Mind-Body Medicine - Tue, 2019-06-04 06:31
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Improving neuropsychiatric symptoms following stroke using virtual reality: A case report.

Medicine (Baltimore). 2019 May;98(19):e15236

Authors: De Luca R, Manuli A, De Domenico C, Lo Voi E, Buda A, Maresca G, Bramanti A, Calabrò RS

Abstract
RATIONALE: Post-stroke cognitive impairment occurs frequently in patients with stroke, with a 20% to 80% prevalence. Anxiety is common after stroke, and is associated with a poorer quality of life. The use of standard relaxation techniques in treating anxiety in patients undergoing post-stroke rehabilitation have shown some positive effects, whereas virtual reality seems to have a role in the treatment of anxiety disorders, especially when associated to neurological damage.
PATIENTS CONCERNS: A 50-year-old woman, smokers, affected by hypertension and right ischemic stroke in the chronic phase (i.e., after 12 months by cerebrovascular event), came to our observation for a severe anxiety state and a mild cognitive deficit, mainly involving attention and visuo-executive processes, besides a mild left hemiparesis.
DIAGNOSIS: Anxiety in a patient with ischemic stroke.
INTERVENTIONS: Standard relaxation techniques alone in a common clinical setting or the same psychological approach in an immersive virtual environment (i.e., Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment - CAREN).
OUTCOMES: The patient's cognitive and psychological profile, with regard to attention processes, mood, anxiety, and coping strategies, were evaluated before and after the 2 different trainings. A significant improvement in the functional and behavioral outcomes were observed only at the end of the combined approach.
LESSONS: The immersive virtual reality environment CAREN might be useful to improve cognitive and psychological status, with regard to anxiety symptoms, in post-stroke individuals.

PMID: 31083155 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Guided imagery for treating hypertension in pregnancy.

Mind-Body Medicine - Tue, 2019-06-04 06:31
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Guided imagery for treating hypertension in pregnancy.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2019 Apr 27;4:CD011337

Authors: Haruna M, Matsuzaki M, Ota E, Shiraishi M, Hanada N, Mori R

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hypertension (high blood pressure) in pregnancy carries a high risk of maternal morbidity and mortality. Although antihypertensive drugs are commonly used, they have adverse effects on mothers and fetuses. Guided imagery is a non-pharmacological technique that has the potential to lower blood pressure among pregnant women with hypertension. Guided imagery is a mind-body therapy that involves the visualisation of various mental images to facilitate relaxation and reduction in blood pressure.
OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of guided imagery as a non-pharmacological treatment of hypertension in pregnancy and its influence on perinatal outcomes.
SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register, and two trials registers (October 2018). We also searched relevant conference proceedings and journals, and scanned the reference lists of retrieved studies.
SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We would have included RCTs using a cluster-randomised design, but none were identified. We excluded quasi-RCTs and cross-over trials.We sought intervention studies of various guided imagery techniques performed during pregnancy in comparison with no intervention or other non-pharmacological treatments for hypertension (e.g. quiet rest, music therapy, aromatherapy, relaxation therapy, acupuncture, acupressure, massage, device-guided slow breathing, hypnosis, physical exercise, and yoga).
DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three review authors independently assessed the trials for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias for the included studies. We checked extracted data for accuracy, and resolved differences in assessments by discussion. We assessed the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach.
MAIN RESULTS: We included two small trials (involving a total of 99 pregnant women) that compared guided imagery with quiet rest. The trials were conducted in Canada and the USA. We assessed both trials as at high risk of performance bias, and low risk of attrition bias; one trial was at low risk for selection, detection, and reporting bias, while the other was at unclear risk for the same domains.We could not perform a meta-analysis because the two included studies reported different outcomes, and the frequency of the intervention was slightly different between the two studies. One study performed guided imagery for 15 minutes at least twice daily for four weeks, or until the baby was born (whichever came first). In the other study, the intervention included guided imagery, self-monitoring of blood pressure, and thermal biofeedback-assisted relaxation training for four total hours; the participants were instructed to practice the procedures twice daily and complete at least three relief relaxation breaks each day. The control groups were similar - one was quiet rest, and the other was quiet rest as bed rest.None of our primary outcomes were reported in the included trials: severe hypertension (either systolic blood pressure of 160 mmHg or higher, or diastolic blood pressure of 110 mmHg or higher); severe pre-eclampsia, or perinatal death (stillbirths plus deaths in the first week of life). Only one of the secondary outcomes was measured.Low-certainty evidence from one trial (69 women) suggests that guided imagery may make little or no difference in the use of antihypertensive drugs (risk ratio 1.27, 95% confidence interval 0.72 to 2.22).
AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to inform practice about the use of guided imagery for hypertension in pregnancy.The available evidence for this review topic is sparse, and the effect of guided imagery for treating hypertension during pregnancy (compared with quiet rest) remains unclear. There was low-certainty evidence that guided imagery made little or no difference to the use of antihypertensive drugs, downgraded because of imprecision.The two included trials did not report on any of the primary outcomes of this review. We did not identify any trials comparing guided imagery with no intervention, or with another non-pharmacological method for hypertension.Large and well-designed RCTs are needed to identify the effects of guided imagery on hypertension during pregnancy and on other relevant outcomes associated with short-term and long-term maternal and neonatal health. Trials could also consider utilisation and costs of health service.

PMID: 31032884 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[The effectiveness of autogenic training in the psycho-corrective treatment of the patients presenting with chronic somatic diseases].

Mind-Body Medicine - Tue, 2019-06-04 06:31
Related Articles

[The effectiveness of autogenic training in the psycho-corrective treatment of the patients presenting with chronic somatic diseases].

Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2018;95(3):11-15

Authors: Aivazyan TA, Zaitsev VP

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The autogenic training (AT) is one of the most widely used methods for psychotherapy of patients suffering from chronic somatic diseases (CSD). A number of studies have demonstrated the improvement of the psychological status in the patients under the influence of autogenic training. However, up to the present time, both the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effectiveness and the predictors of the AT effectiveness have remained to be poorly studied which hampers the development of differentiated indications for the application of this technique.
AIM: The objective of the present study was to estimate the effectiveness of AT and to identify the predictors of the outcomes of the treatment of patients presenting with chronic somatic diseases.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 325 patients with CSD who were examined with the use of the shortened multifactorial personality inventory (SMPI), the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Beck depression inventory (BDI) scales. The patients were randomized into two groups. Group 1 (main) was comprised of 163 patients who underwent AT-based psychotherapy, group 2 (control) consisted of 162 patients who did not receive the psychotherapy. In order to identify the predictors of AT effectiveness, the patients of the main group were subdivided into two subgroups at the end of the study period: (a) including 128 patients whose psychologic status was normalized under psychotherapy and (b) containing 35 patients showing the improvement of their health status. The comparative analysis of the baseline characteristics of the patients belonging to each group was performed.
RESULTS: The study has demonstrated that by the end of the observation period the patients of the main group showed a significantly more pronounced (compared with controls) decrease of scales 1, 2, and 7 indicators, an increase of the SMPI scale 9 indicators, and a decrease of STAI and BDI indicators. The positive impact of autogenic training on the psychological status of the patients was mostly attributable to the reduction of anxiety, tension, fixation on negative sensations, and sensitivity to the stress factors as well as to the increased activity and the improved mood. The study of AT predictors revealed that the increase of scales 4 and 6 of SMPI and BDI indicators fairly well predicts the lack of the effectiveness of the method under consideration.
CONCLUSIONS: The beneficial influence of the autogenic training on the psychological status of the patients presenting with chronic somatic diseases is mainly mediated through the decrease of anxiety, tension, fixation on negative feelings, sensitivity to stressful influences, increased activity, and improved mood of the patients. A study of AT effectiveness predictors revealed that an increased level of rigidity reduces the effectiveness of this method because of the tendency of the patients toward making excessive efforts to achieve the state of relaxation. The predictors of the high effectiveness of AT the development of which requires regular training proved to be a moderate decrease of the psychological adaptation level together with such characteristics as the ability of the patients to control their behavior, purposefulness, and perseverance in achieving the goal.

PMID: 29985375 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Mapping the Cortical Network Arising From Up-Regulated Amygdaloidal Activation Using -Louvain Algorithm.

Mind-Body Medicine - Tue, 2019-06-04 06:31
Related Articles

Mapping the Cortical Network Arising From Up-Regulated Amygdaloidal Activation Using -Louvain Algorithm.

IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng. 2018 06;26(6):1169-1177

Authors: Liu N, Yu X, Yao L, Zhao X

Abstract
The amygdala plays an important role in emotion processing. Several studies have proved that its activation can be regulated by real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI)-based neurofeedback training. However, although studies have found brain regions that are functionally closely connected to the amygdala in the cortex, it is not clear whether these brain regions and the amygdala are structurally closely connected, and if they show the same training effect as the amygdala in the process of emotional regulation. In this paper, we instructed subjects to up-regulate the activation of the left amygdala (LA) through rtfMRI-based neurofeedback training. In order to fuse multimodal imaging data, we introduced a network analysis method called the -Louvain clustering algorithm. This method was used to integrate multimodal data from the training experiment and construct an LA-cortical network. Correlation analysis and main-effect analysis were conducted to determine the signal covariance associated with the activation of the target area; ultimately, we identified the left temporal pole superior as the amygdaloidal-cortical network region. As a deep nucleus in the brain, the treatment and stimulation of the amygdala remains challenging. Our results provide new insights for the regulation of activation in a deep nucleus using more neurofeedback techniques.

PMID: 29877841 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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