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Mind Body Medicine

Integrated Cancer Treatment in the Course of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: Complete Resolution in 2 Cases.

Mind-Body Medicine - Sat, 2019-04-20 07:47
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Integrated Cancer Treatment in the Course of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: Complete Resolution in 2 Cases.

Integr Cancer Ther. 2018 09;17(3):994-999

Authors: Bonucci M, Pastore C, Ferrera V, Fiorentini C, Fabbri A

Abstract
Pancreatic cancer (PC) has a very low average survival, but its prognosis is further reduced in the case of metastatic spread. Medical therapy in these cases is the only applicable methodology in the international guidelines. During anticancer treatments, common side effects are nausea, vomiting, arthralgia, neuropathy, and alopecia as well as a myelosuppressive effect. The toxicity of various drugs not only affects the quality of life of the patient, but often its severity requires a reduction in if not the termination of drug administration. Scientific studies have shown that a combined use of chemotherapy and certain natural substances, in the form of standardized extracts, can lead to an enhancement of the action of the chemotherapy. Here, we describe 2 cases of metastatic PC. The first case concerns the integrated treatment of a patient with cancer of the pancreas tail with metastatic involvement ab initio of peripancreatic lymph nodes and liver parenchyma, with numerous secondary lesions greater than 9.5 cm. The second case concerns the integrated treatment of a patient with cancer of the pancreatic body with metastatic involvement of the liver parenchyma, with a small secondary lesion. In both cases, an integrated cancer treatment approach, combining chemotherapy with natural remedies, extracts, and hyperthermia, induced a notable remission of primary and metastatic lesions.

PMID: 29478350 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Use of Mindfulness or Self-Hypnosis Provides Immediate Pain Relief to Hospitalized Patients.

Mind-Body Medicine - Sat, 2019-04-20 07:47
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Use of Mindfulness or Self-Hypnosis Provides Immediate Pain Relief to Hospitalized Patients.

Am Fam Physician. 2017 Nov 15;96(10):Online

Authors: Shrikant Kulkarni N

PMID: 29431391 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Feedback on a complementary care program combining physical activity, mindfulness-based meditation and socio-aesthetic care].

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-04-19 07:45
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[Feedback on a complementary care program combining physical activity, mindfulness-based meditation and socio-aesthetic care].

Bull Cancer. 2019 Apr;106(4):304-315

Authors: Charles C, Boinon D, Renvoisé N, Pallubicki G, Borch-Jacobsen C, Laplanche O, Ginsbourger T, Dauchy S

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Increasing physical activity among cancer patients is one of the priority recommendations in tertiary prevention; the level of physical activity is one of the determining factors in reducing the risk of relapse and mortality. However, many barriers to initiation and maintenance of regular physical activity have been identified. A program combining bi-weekly adapted physical activity sessions, mindfulness-based meditation and socio-aesthetic care was put together in 2015, in a Cancer Center, in order to facilitate adherence and sustainable attendance.
METHODS: Data on patient participation of program components, patient satisfaction, and psycho-corporal changes, collected in ecological conditions between 2015 and 2017 from 144 participants, were retrospectively analyzed to provide a first assessment.
RESULTS: Nearly 60% of the patients were in treatment, 17% were metastatic. The average participation time was 9 months, with an average of one physical activity session per week. Changes were observed, both quantitatively and qualitatively, in terms of emotional state, sleep and body image. The overall satisfaction rate was 96%.
DISCUSSION: The conclusions of the study support the continuation of the program. The methodological limitations of this pilot format may be overtaken in future research, which will allow further in-depth investigations into the effects of combined approaches on sustainable physical activity.

PMID: 30777301 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Benefit of Gender-Affirming Medical Treatment for Transgender Elders: Later-Life Alignment of Mind and Body.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-04-19 07:45
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Benefit of Gender-Affirming Medical Treatment for Transgender Elders: Later-Life Alignment of Mind and Body.

LGBT Health. 2019 Jan;6(1):34-39

Authors: Cai X, Hughto JMW, Reisner SL, Pachankis JE, Levy BR

Abstract
PURPOSE: This study examined whether older age moderates the association between gender-affirming medical treatment and quality of life (QOL) among transgender individuals.
METHODS: Transgender men and women from the National Transgender Discrimination Survey who had either recently or never undergone medical treatment were included (n = 2420). A moderation analysis was utilized.
RESULTS: As predicted, participants who initiated medical treatment had higher QOL than those who did not. Age moderated this association. The QOL difference was greater for older than for younger transgender individuals.
CONCLUSION: Among all transgender men and women, gender-affirming medical treatment can be especially beneficial for elders.

PMID: 30562128 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Robust desynchronization of Parkinson's disease pathological oscillations by frequency modulation of delayed feedback deep brain stimulation.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-04-19 07:45
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Robust desynchronization of Parkinson's disease pathological oscillations by frequency modulation of delayed feedback deep brain stimulation.

PLoS One. 2018;13(11):e0207761

Authors: Daneshzand M, Faezipour M, Barkana BD

Abstract
The hyperkinetic symptoms of Parkinson's Disease (PD) are associated with the ensembles of interacting oscillators that cause excess or abnormal synchronous behavior within the Basal Ganglia (BG) circuitry. Delayed feedback stimulation is a closed loop technique shown to suppress this synchronous oscillatory activity. Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) via delayed feedback is known to destabilize the complex intermittent synchronous states. Computational models of the BG network are often introduced to investigate the effect of delayed feedback high frequency stimulation on partially synchronized dynamics. In this study, we develop a reduced order model of four interacting nuclei of the BG as well as considering the Thalamo-Cortical local effects on the oscillatory dynamics. This model is able to capture the emergence of 34 Hz beta band oscillations seen in the Local Field Potential (LFP) recordings of the PD state. Train of high frequency pulses in a delayed feedback stimulation has shown deficiencies such as strengthening the synchronization in case of highly fluctuating neuronal activities, increasing the energy consumed as well as the incapability of activating all neurons in a large-scale network. To overcome these drawbacks, we propose a new feedback control variable based on the filtered and linearly delayed LFP recordings. The proposed control variable is then used to modulate the frequency of the stimulation signal rather than its amplitude. In strongly coupled networks, oscillations reoccur as soon as the amplitude of the stimulus signal declines. Therefore, we show that maintaining a fixed amplitude and modulating the frequency might ameliorate the desynchronization process, increase the battery lifespan and activate substantial regions of the administered DBS electrode. The charge balanced stimulus pulse itself is embedded with a delay period between its charges to grant robust desynchronization with lower amplitudes needed. The efficiency of the proposed Frequency Adjustment Stimulation (FAS) protocol in a delayed feedback method might contribute to further investigation of DBS modulations aspired to address a wide range of abnormal oscillatory behavior observed in neurological disorders.

PMID: 30458039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part XLVI: Mindfulness, Meditation, and Burnout.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-04-19 07:45
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Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part XLVI: Mindfulness, Meditation, and Burnout.

Clin Nucl Med. 2019 Apr;44(4):289-291

Authors: Harolds JA

Abstract
Some of the approaches to prevent and recover from burnout focus on the individual, and others focus on organizational initiatives. A common recommendation for the individual with burnout is to practice meditation and mindfulness. Mindfulness may be defined as focused awareness without judgment regarding the current instance in time. The practice of mindfulness and the outcome of various mindfulness courses will be discussed in this article. Other approaches on the subject of burnout regarding individual efforts and organizational changes will be discussed in subsequent articles in this series.

PMID: 30273202 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Differential Experimental Effects of a Short Bout of Walking, Meditation, or Combination of Walking and Meditation on State Anxiety Among Young Adults.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-04-19 07:45
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Differential Experimental Effects of a Short Bout of Walking, Meditation, or Combination of Walking and Meditation on State Anxiety Among Young Adults.

Am J Health Promot. 2018 05;32(4):949-958

Authors: Edwards MK, Rosenbaum S, Loprinzi PD

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Single bouts of aerobic exercise and meditation have been shown to improve anxiety states. Yet to be evaluated in the literature, we sought to examine the effects of a single, short bout of aerobic exercise or meditation, as well as exercise and meditation combined on state anxiety among young adults.
DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.
SETTING: University.
SUBJECTS: Participants (N = 110, mean age = 21.4 years) were randomly assigned to walk, meditate, walk then meditate, meditate then walk, or to sit (inactive control).
MEASURES: All walking and meditation bouts were 10 minutes in duration. Participants' state anxiety was monitored before and after the intervention using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire.
RESULTS: Significant group × time interaction effects were observed ( P = .01). Post hoc paired t tests revealed that state anxiety significantly decreased from baseline to postintervention in the meditation ( P = .002), meditation then walk ( P = .002), and walk then meditation ( P = .03) groups but not the walk ( P = .75) or control ( P = .45) groups.
CONCLUSION: Meditation (vs a brisk walk) may be a preferred method of attenuating anxiety symptomology. Individuals desiring the health benefits associated with aerobic exercise may achieve additional anxiolytic benefits if they employ a brief meditation session before or after exercising.

PMID: 29216745 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The Effects of Mind-Body Exercise on Cognitive Performance in Elderly: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-04-18 07:44
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The Effects of Mind-Body Exercise on Cognitive Performance in Elderly: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 12 09;15(12):

Authors: Zhang Y, Li C, Zou L, Liu X, Song W

Abstract
Background: As the situation of cognitive aging is getting worse, preventing or treating cognitive decline through effective strategies is highly important. This systematic review aims to investigate whether mind-body exercise is an effective approach for treating cognition decline. Methods: Searches for the potential studies were performed on the eight electronic databases (MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, PsycArtilces, CNKI, and Wanfang). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effect of mind-body exercise on cognitive performance in older adults were included. Data were extracted and effect sizes were pooled with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) using random-effects models. The Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale was employed to examine the study quality. Results: Nineteen RCTs including 2539 elders (67.3% female) with fair to good study quality were identified. Mind-body exercise, relative to control intervention, showed significant benefits on cognitive performance, global cognition (Hedges'g = 0.23), executive functions (Hedges'g = 0.25 to 0.65), learning and memory (Hedges'g = 0.37 to 0.49), and language (Hedges'g = 0.35). In addition, no significant adverse events were reported. Conclusion: Mind-body exercise may be a safe and effective intervention for enhancing cognitive function among people aged 60 years or older. Further research evidence is still needed to make a more conclusive statement.

PMID: 30544873 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Teaching stress management in undergraduate dental education: are we doing enough?

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-04-18 07:44
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Teaching stress management in undergraduate dental education: are we doing enough?

Br Dent J. 2018 03 23;224(6):405-407

Authors: Colley JM, Harris M, Hellyer P, Radford DR

Abstract
Dentistry is recognised as a stressful profession. A number of studies focusing on undergraduate education have shown high levels of stress in dental students. However, despite calls to do so, little has been published on methods to teach future dental professionals about stress and how to manage it on a personal level. Psychological stress which is uncontrolled may have an effect on general health. It is recognised, however, that stress can be beneficial if channelled appropriately. Techniques and ways to teach management of potential stresses of a career in dentistry have still not been widely reported in either dental undergraduate or postgraduate education. An intervention used with final year dental students at the University of Portsmouth for the last four years has highlighted some of the problems raised by students coping with a stressful programme of study. Students' comments indicated the need for an educational intervention on recognising and reducing stress to be introduced earlier on in their curriculum and that it should be universally taught.

PMID: 29545543 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Using Feedback Control to Reduce Limb Impedance during Forceful Contractions.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-04-18 07:44
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Using Feedback Control to Reduce Limb Impedance during Forceful Contractions.

Sci Rep. 2017 08 24;7(1):9317

Authors: Hu X, Ludvig D, Murray WM, Perreault EJ

Abstract
Little is known about the ability to precisely regulate forces or torques during unexpected disturbances, as required during numerous tasks. Effective force regulation implies small changes in force responding to externally imposed displacements, a behavior characterized by low limb impedance. This task can be challenging, since the intrinsic impedance of muscles increases when generating volitional forces. The purpose of this study was to examine the ability to voluntarily reduce limb impedance during force regulation, and the neural mechanisms associated with that ability. Small displacement perturbations were used to quantify elbow impedance during the exertion of volitional elbow torques from 0% to 20% of maximum voluntary contraction. Subjects were instructed either to not intervene with the imposed perturbations or to explicitly intervene so as to minimize the influence of the perturbations on the elbow torque. Our results demonstrated that individuals can reduce the low frequency components of elbow impedance by 35%. Electromyographic analysis suggested that this behavior is mediated by volitional and possibly long-latency reflex pathways with delays of at least 120 ms. These results provide a context for understanding how feedback altered by aging or injuries may influence the ability to regulate forces precisely.

PMID: 28839242 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Provision of somatosensory inputs during motor imagery enhances learning-induced plasticity in human motor cortex.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-04-18 07:44
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Provision of somatosensory inputs during motor imagery enhances learning-induced plasticity in human motor cortex.

Sci Rep. 2017 08 24;7(1):9300

Authors: Bonassi G, Biggio M, Bisio A, Ruggeri P, Bove M, Avanzino L

Abstract
Motor learning via physical practice leads to long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in motor cortex (M1) and temporary occlusion of additional LTP-like plasticity. Motor learning can be achieved through simulation of movement, namely motor imagery (MI). When combined with electrical stimulation, MI influenced M1 excitability to a larger extent than MI itself. We explored whether a training based on the combination of MI and peripheral nerve stimulation (ESMI) modulates M1 LTP-like plasticity inducing retention of a new acquired skill. Twelve subjects mentally performed thumb-index movements, with synchronous electrical nerve stimulation, following an acoustic cue, in order to increase movement speed. Two control groups physically performed or imagined the same number of finger movements following the acoustic cue. After each training session, M1 LTP-like plasticity was assessed by using PAS25 (paired associative stimulation) technique. Performance was tested before and after training and 24 hours after training. Results showed that physical practice and ESMI training similarly increased movement speed, prevented the subsequent PAS25-induced LTP-like plasticity, and induced retention of motor skill the following day. Training with MI had significant, but minor effects. These findings suggest that a training combining MI with somatosensory input influences motor performance through M1 plasticity similarly to motor execution.

PMID: 28839226 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Biomedical risk assessment as an aid for smoking cessation.

Mind-Body Medicine - Wed, 2019-04-17 07:40
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Biomedical risk assessment as an aid for smoking cessation.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2019 03 26;3:CD004705

Authors: Clair C, Mueller Y, Livingstone-Banks J, Burnand B, Camain JY, Cornuz J, Rège-Walther M, Selby K, Bize R

Abstract
BACKGROUND: A possible strategy for increasing smoking cessation rates could be to provide smokers with feedback on the current or potential future biomedical effects of smoking using, for example, measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO), lung function, or genetic susceptibility to lung cancer or other diseases.
OBJECTIVES: The main objective was to determine the efficacy of providing smokers with feedback on their exhaled CO measurement, spirometry results, atherosclerotic plaque imaging, and genetic susceptibility to smoking-related diseases in helping them to quit smoking.
SEARCH METHODS: For the most recent update, we searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register in March 2018 and ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP in September 2018 for studies added since the last update in 2012.
SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria for the review were: a randomised controlled trial design; participants being current smokers; interventions based on a biomedical test to increase smoking cessation rates; control groups receiving all other components of intervention; and an outcome of smoking cessation rate at least six months after the start of the intervention.
DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We expressed results as a risk ratio (RR) for smoking cessation with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where appropriate, we pooled studies using a Mantel-Haenszel random-effects method.
MAIN RESULTS: We included 20 trials using a variety of biomedical tests interventions; one trial included two interventions, for a total of 21 interventions. We included a total of 9262 participants, all of whom were adult smokers. All studies included both men and women adult smokers at different stages of change and motivation for smoking cessation. We judged all but three studies to be at high or unclear risk of bias in at least one domain. We pooled trials in three categories according to the type of biofeedback provided: feedback on risk exposure (five studies); feedback on smoking-related disease risk (five studies); and feedback on smoking-related harm (11 studies). There was no evidence of increased cessation rates from feedback on risk exposure, consisting mainly of feedback on CO measurement, in five pooled trials (RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.21; I2 = 0%; n = 2368). Feedback on smoking-related disease risk, including four studies testing feedback on genetic markers for cancer risk and one study with feedback on genetic markers for risk of Crohn's disease, did not show a benefit in smoking cessation (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.01; I2 = 0%; n = 2064). Feedback on smoking-related harm, including nine studies testing spirometry with or without feedback on lung age and two studies on feedback on carotid ultrasound, also did not show a benefit (RR 1.26, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.61; I2 = 34%; n = 3314). Only one study directly compared multiple forms of measurement with a single form of measurement, and did not detect a significant difference in effect between measurement of CO plus genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and measurement of CO only (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.56; n = 189).
AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is little evidence about the effects of biomedical risk assessment as an aid for smoking cessation. The most promising results relate to spirometry and carotid ultrasound, where moderate-certainty evidence, limited by imprecision and risk of bias, did not detect a statistically significant benefit, but confidence intervals very narrowly missed one, and the point estimate favoured the intervention. A sensitivity analysis removing those studies at high risk of bias did detect a benefit. Moderate-certainty evidence limited by risk of bias did not detect an effect of feedback on smoking exposure by CO monitoring. Low-certainty evidence, limited by risk of bias and imprecision, did not detect a benefit from feedback on smoking-related risk by genetic marker testing. There is insufficient evidence with which to evaluate the hypothesis that multiple types of assessment are more effective than single forms of assessment.

PMID: 30912847 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

The effect of a six-week focused meditation training on depression and anxiety symptoms in Brazilian university students with 6 and 12 months of follow-up.

Mind-Body Medicine - Wed, 2019-04-17 07:40
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The effect of a six-week focused meditation training on depression and anxiety symptoms in Brazilian university students with 6 and 12 months of follow-up.

J Affect Disord. 2019 03 01;246:401-407

Authors: Carpena MX, Tavares PS, Menezes CB

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Evidence shows high prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms among university students. This study investigated whether a meditation-based program would help reducing these symptoms in this population.
METHODS: Non-randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of a six-week focused meditation training on depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory) outcomes among university students. Participants were allocated into a meditation or waiting list control group. Assessment occurred pre and post intervention and only for the meditation group at 6 and 12 months follow-up. General linear model for repeated measures evaluated the intervention effect considering group and time factors, controlling for minor psychiatric disorders, gender and absence at meetings.
RESULTS: The meditation group presented a reduction in depression and anxiety symptoms after intervention compared to controls. Among the meditation group, depression (at 6 months follow-up) and anxiety (at 6 and 12 months follow-up) scores were lower for those who continued practicing.
LIMITATIONS: Non-randomization and absence of daily practice record (precluding dose-response gradient evaluation).
CONCLUSION: The meditation training was effective in reducing depression and anxiety symptoms, but the maintanance of these reductions only occurred for those who continued meditating. Permanent meditation programs may be an alternative for promoting mental health for university students.

PMID: 30597302 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Brief, daily meditation enhances attention, memory, mood, and emotional regulation in non-experienced meditators.

Mind-Body Medicine - Wed, 2019-04-17 07:40
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Brief, daily meditation enhances attention, memory, mood, and emotional regulation in non-experienced meditators.

Behav Brain Res. 2019 01 01;356:208-220

Authors: Basso JC, McHale A, Ende V, Oberlin DJ, Suzuki WA

Abstract
Meditation is an ancient practice that cultivates a calm yet focused mind; however, little is known about how short, practical meditation practices affect cognitive functioning in meditation-naïve populations. To address this question, we randomized subjects (ages of 18-45) who were non-experienced meditators into either a 13-min daily guided meditation session or a 13-min daily podcast listening session (control group) for a total duration of 8 weeks. We examined the effects of the daily meditation practice relative to podcast listening on mood, prefrontal and hippocampal functioning, baseline cortisol levels, and emotional regulation using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Compared to our control group, we found that 8 but not 4 weeks of brief, daily meditation decreased negative mood state and enhanced attention, working memory, and recognition memory as well as decreased state anxiety scores on the TSST. Furthermore, we report that meditation-induced changes in emotional regulation are more strongly linked to improved affective state than improved cognition. This study not only suggests a lower limit for the duration of brief daily meditation needed to see significant benefits in non-experienced meditators, but suggests that even relatively short daily meditation practice can have similar behavioral effects as longer duration and higher-intensity mediation practices.

PMID: 30153464 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Compassion and Loving-Kindness Meditation: An Overview and Prospects for the Application in Clinical Samples.

Mind-Body Medicine - Wed, 2019-04-17 07:40
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Compassion and Loving-Kindness Meditation: An Overview and Prospects for the Application in Clinical Samples.

Harv Rev Psychiatry. 2018 Jul/Aug;26(4):201-215

Authors: Graser J, Stangier U

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This article presents a brief overview of the empirical evidence of well-established mindfulness interventions and an in-depth review of less-established compassion-based interventions (CBIs) and loving-kindness meditation (LKM). Definitions, cognitive and physiological mechanisms, and methods of assessment are discussed.
METHOD: A literature review using the databases Google Scholar, PsycINFO, and PubMed was conducted.
RESULTS: Whereas the efficacy of mindfulness-based stress reduction and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy has been documented in many trials, only seven randomized, controlled trials have been completed on CBIs and LKM. In these trials, CBIs were effective in treating psychotic disorders, affective disorders with psychotic features, major depressive disorder, eating disorders, and patients with suicide attempts in the past year; LKM was effective in treating chronic pain; and a combination of both was effective for borderline personality disorder. A larger number of nonrandomized studies indicate that CBIs and LKM may be effective in treating a wide range of clinical conditions, including depression, anxiety disorders, chronic pain, and posttraumatic stress disorder.
CONCLUSIONS: Further studies are needed to confirm the promising effects of CBIs and LKM. Preliminary evidence suggests that both approaches might be beneficial across various clinical populations. Future studies need to clarify whether these approaches might be options as stand-alone treatments or as adjuncts or augmentation of evidence-based methods in psychotherapy.

PMID: 29975338 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Clowns in Paediatric Surgery: Less Anxiety and More Oxytocin? A Pilot Study.

Mind-Body Medicine - Wed, 2019-04-17 07:40
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Clowns in Paediatric Surgery: Less Anxiety and More Oxytocin? A Pilot Study.

Klin Padiatr. 2017 Sep;229(5):274-280

Authors: Scheel T, Hoeppner D, Grotevendt A, Barthlen W

Abstract
Background Hospital stays and medical interventions are accompanied by worries and anxiety in children and parents. Recent studies show that hospital clowns may reduce anxiety and enhance well-being. However, so far studies are based solely on subjective measures and clowns are usually not integrated in medical routine. With this pilot study, we aim to provide both psychological and physiological evidence of positive effects of clowns' interventions in hospitalized children. Patients/Method In a consecutive randomized intervention-control group design with 31 children aged 4 to 13 years, 17 patients were accompanied by a clown prior to surgery or during ward round (intervention group) and 14 were not (control group). Saliva samples for oxytocin measurement were taken from all patients before hospitalization (T1) and prior to surgery or after ward round (T2). Self- and parents-reports were obtained at T1, T2 as well as at time of discharge from hospital (T3) regarding children's anxiety (STAI), worries and well-being. Clowns evaluated their success in cheering up the child. Health professionals were asked for their acceptance of clowns in hospitals. Results Children in the intervention group had lower anxiety ratings and a higher oxytocin concentration at T2 as compared with T1; the control group showed no changes. Parents rated the well-being of their children higher if their child had clown's contact and were more willing to recommend the hospital. The staff judged the clowns as helpful for patients. Discussion Consistent psychological and physiological results suggest the positive impact of a clown's intervention in hospitalized children.

PMID: 28806842 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]; +24 new citations

Mind-Body Medicine - Tue, 2019-04-16 07:38

24 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]

These pubmed results were generated on 2019/04/16

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Yoga for treating urinary incontinence in women.

Mind-Body Medicine - Sat, 2019-04-13 07:28
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Yoga for treating urinary incontinence in women.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2019 02 28;2:CD012668

Authors: Wieland LS, Shrestha N, Lassi ZS, Panda S, Chiaramonte D, Skoetz N

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence in women is associated with poor quality of life and difficulties in social, psychological and sexual functioning. The condition may affect up to 15% of middle-aged or older women in the general population. Conservative treatments such as lifestyle interventions, bladder training and pelvic floor muscle training (used either alone or in combination with other interventions) are the initial approaches to the management of urinary incontinence. Many women are interested in additional treatments such as yoga, a system of philosophy, lifestyle and physical practice that originated in ancient India.
OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of yoga for treating urinary incontinence in women.
SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Incontinence and Cochrane Complementary Medicine Specialised Registers. We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov to identify any ongoing or unpublished studies. We handsearched Proceedings of the International Congress on Complementary Medicine Research and the European Congress for Integrative Medicine. We searched the NHS Economic Evaluation Database for economic studies, and supplemented this search with searches for economics studies in MEDLINE and Embase from 2015 onwards. Database searches are up-to-date as of 21 June 2018.
SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials in women diagnosed with urinary incontinence in which one group was allocated to treatment with yoga.
DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts of all retrieved articles, selected studies for inclusion, extracted data, assessed risk of bias and evaluated the certainty of the evidence for each reported outcome. Any disagreements were resolved by consensus. We planned to combine clinically comparable studies in Review Manager 5 using random-effects meta-analysis and to carry out sensitivity and subgroup analyses. We planned to create a table listing economic studies on yoga for incontinence but not carry out any analyses on these studies.
MAIN RESULTS: We included two studies (involving a total of 49 women). Each study compared yoga to a different comparator, therefore we were unable to combine the data in a meta-analysis. A third study that has been completed but not yet fully reported is awaiting assessment.One included study was a six-week study comparing yoga to a waiting list in 19 women with either urgency urinary incontinence or stress urinary incontinence. We judged the certainty of the evidence for all reported outcomes as very low due to performance bias, detection bias, and imprecision. The number of women reporting cure was not reported. We are uncertain whether yoga results in satisfaction with cure or improvement of incontinence (risk ratio (RR) 6.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.44 to 27.88; an increase of 592 from 111 per 1000, 95% CI 160 to 1000). We are uncertain whether there is a difference between yoga and waiting list in condition-specific quality of life as measured on the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire Short Form (mean difference (MD) 1.74, 95% CI -33.02 to 36.50); the number of micturitions (MD -0.77, 95% CI -2.13 to 0.59); the number of incontinence episodes (MD -1.57, 95% CI -2.83 to -0.31); or the bothersomeness of incontinence as measured on the Urogenital Distress Inventory 6 (MD -0.90, 95% CI -1.46 to -0.34). There was no evidence of a difference in the number of women who experienced at least one adverse event (risk difference 0%, 95% CI -38% to 38%; no difference from 222 per 1000, 95% CI 380 fewer to 380 more).The second included study was an eight-week study in 30 women with urgency urinary incontinence that compared mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) to an active control intervention of yoga classes. The study was unblinded, and there was high attrition from both study arms for all outcome assessments. We judged the certainty of the evidence for all reported outcomes as very low due to performance bias, attrition bias, imprecision and indirectness. The number of women reporting cure was not reported. We are uncertain whether women in the yoga group were less likely to report improvement in incontinence at eight weeks compared to women in the MBSR group (RR 0.09, 95% CI 0.01 to 1.43; a decrease of 419 from 461 per 1000, 95% CI 5 to 660). We are uncertain about the effect of MBSR compared to yoga on reports of cure or improvement in incontinence, improvement in condition-specific quality of life measured on the Overactive Bladder Health-Related Quality of Life Scale, reduction in incontinence episodes or reduction in bothersomeness of incontinence as measured on the Overactive Bladder Symptom and Quality of Life-Short Form at eight weeks. The study did not report on adverse effects.
AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We identified few trials on yoga for incontinence, and the existing trials were small and at high risk of bias. In addition, we did not find any studies of economic outcomes related to yoga for urinary incontinence. Due to the lack of evidence to answer the review question, we are uncertain whether yoga is useful for women with urinary incontinence. Additional, well-conducted trials with larger sample sizes are needed.

PMID: 30816997 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Is hypnotherapy helpful for irritable bowel syndrome in primary and secondary care?

Mind-Body Medicine - Sat, 2019-04-13 07:28
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Is hypnotherapy helpful for irritable bowel syndrome in primary and secondary care?

Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019 01;4(1):2-3

Authors: Palsson OS

PMID: 30473201 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Anti-Fatigue, Antioxidation, and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Eucalyptus Oil Aromatherapy in Swimming-Exercised Rats.

Mind-Body Medicine - Sat, 2019-04-13 07:28
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Anti-Fatigue, Antioxidation, and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Eucalyptus Oil Aromatherapy in Swimming-Exercised Rats.

Chin J Physiol. 2018 Oct 31;61(5):257-265

Authors: Lin TC, Wang SH, Huang CC, Lai YC, Song TY, Tsai MS

Abstract
Eucalyptus globulus possesses important pharmacological activities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the anti-fatigue, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects of eucalyptus essential oil after swimming exercise using an animal model. Male Sprague– Dawley rats were administered eucalyptus oil (200 μL/h) daily via inhalation (15 min), and anti-fatigue effects were assessed following eucalyptus essential oil administration for 2 or 4 weeks when forced to swim until exhaustion while carrying ~5% body weight-equivalent. To assess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, control and oil-treated groups were subjected to swimming, which was intensified from 90 min to 120 min daily over 4 weeks, with non-swimming groups included as controls. The 2- and 4-week-treated rats increased their swimming-to-exhaustion time by 46 s and 111 s, respectively. Additionally, lactate (LA), creatine kinase (CK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities increased significantly in the non-treated swimming relative to levels observed in the non-swimming groups (P < 0.05); however, no significant differences in these markers were observed between the treated groups. The anti-fatigue effects were related to LA clearance and reduced LDH and CK concentrations. Moreover, compared to the corresponding levels in the non-swimmers, the non-treated swimmers showed markedly elevated levels of liver malondialdehyde (MDA), xanthine oxidase (XO), and other factors, but significantly decreased (P < 0.05) glutathione (GSH) concentrations. However, compared with that of the non-swimmer group, the treated swimming group showed no significant changes in these levels (P > 0.05), suggesting stable XO and MDA production and maintenance of GSH levels. These results suggested that eucalyptus oil aromatherapy increased rat swimming performance and antioxidant capacity and decreased oxidative damage and inflammatory reactions in tissues, indicating good anti-fatigue, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects after high-intensity endurance exercise.

PMID: 30384399 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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