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Readability of Prostate Cancer Information Online: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Health Literacy - Sat, 2019-06-15 07:03
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Readability of Prostate Cancer Information Online: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Am J Mens Health. 2018 09;12(5):1665-1669

Authors: Basch CH, Ethan D, MacLean SA, Fera J, Garcia P, Basch CE

Abstract
Reading and understanding health information, both components of health literacy, can influence patient decisions related to disease management. Older adults, the population of males at greatest risk for prostate cancer, may have compromised capacity to understand and use health information. The purpose of this study was to determine the readability of prostate cancer materials on the Internet using five recommended readability tests. Using a cleared Internet browser, a search was conducted for "prostate cancer." The URLs of the first 100 websites in English were recorded to create the sample. The readability scores for each website were determined using an online, recommended service. This service generates five commonly recommended readability tests. All five tests revealed that the majority of websites had difficult readability. There were no significant differences identified between websites with .org, .gov, or .edu extension versus those with .com, .net, or other extension. It is apparent that the Internet is used often as a resource for health-related information. This study demonstrates that the large majority of information available on the Internet about prostate cancer will not be readable for many individuals.

PMID: 29888641 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Health Literacy

Analyzing Social Media Imagery for Health Messages.

Mind-Body Medicine - Sat, 2019-06-15 07:03
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Analyzing Social Media Imagery for Health Messages.

J Nurs Educ. 2018 Mar 01;57(3):191-192

Authors: Groller KD

PMID: 29505083 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Culturally Competent Communication: Building a Culture of Safety Through Online Role-Playing.

Mind-Body Medicine - Sat, 2019-06-15 07:03
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Culturally Competent Communication: Building a Culture of Safety Through Online Role-Playing.

J Nurs Educ. 2018 Feb 01;57(2):128

Authors: Townsend BA

PMID: 29384578 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

health literacy[MeSH Terms]; +21 new citations

Health Literacy - Fri, 2019-06-14 10:01

21 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

health literacy[MeSH Terms]

These pubmed results were generated on 2019/06/14

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Categories: Health Literacy

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]; +40 new citations

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-06-14 10:01

40 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

mind-body therapies[MeSH Terms]

These pubmed results were generated on 2019/06/14

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

[Health Literacy].

Health Literacy - Sat, 2019-06-08 06:43
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[Health Literacy].

Gesundheitswesen. 2018 Aug;80(8-09):754-766

Authors: Bitzer EM, Sørensen K

Abstract
This article provides an introduction to the definition and current theoretical/conceptual models for health literacy as well as their scope and importance to the provision of modern healthcare. We illustrate methods for measuring the health literacy of individuals - and explain why it is worthwhile to deal with the topic of health literacy. In addition, we present strategies and technologies with which healthcare facilities can take the health literacy of its patients appropriately into account and provide an overview of current national and international political initiatives on the topic of health literacy.

PMID: 30176683 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Health Literacy

When Trust Is Not Enough: A Serial Mediation Model Explaining the Effect of Race Identity, eHealth Information Efficacy, and Information Behavior on Intention to Participate in Clinical Research.

Health Literacy - Sat, 2019-06-08 06:43
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When Trust Is Not Enough: A Serial Mediation Model Explaining the Effect of Race Identity, eHealth Information Efficacy, and Information Behavior on Intention to Participate in Clinical Research.

Health Educ Behav. 2018 12;45(6):1036-1042

Authors: Strekalova YA

Abstract
Black participants remain significantly underrepresented in clinical research. Mistrust in medical researchers has been named a key barrier to the successful enrollment of minority study participants. However, trust is a social-interactional construct, and its effects on behavior are complex. This study hypothesized that intention to participate in clinical research is mediated by trust in medical researchers, eHealth literacy, and information seeking behavior. The data were collected through an online survey ( N = 340) and analyzed to identify serial mediation. The model showed insignificant direct effect of race identity on behavioral intention, c' = -0.19, t(335) = -1.22, p = .22, but a significant total effect, c = -0.44, t(335) = -2.59, p < .01. The indirect effect of race identity on behavioral intention was also significant. The positive effect of trust in medical researchers on decisions to participate in clinical research can be amplified by stronger eHealth literacy and active information seeking, which can be supported through focused strategic health education and communication interventions. A focus on the development of information literacy that could provide prospective minority research volunteers with skills for informed decision making should be explored as an option for increasing mindful, informed participation in clinical research among currently underrepresented racial and ethnic groups.

PMID: 29478354 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Health Literacy

Feasibility of a psychosis information intervention to improve mental health literacy for professional groups in contact with young people.

Health Literacy - Sat, 2019-06-08 06:43
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Feasibility of a psychosis information intervention to improve mental health literacy for professional groups in contact with young people.

Early Interv Psychiatry. 2018 04;12(2):234-239

Authors: Sutton M, O'Keeffe D, Frawley T, Madigan K, Fanning F, Lawlor E, Roche E, Kelly A, Turner N, Horenstein A, O'Callaghan E, Clarke M

Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a psychosis information intervention for professionals in contact with young people in Ireland. A quasi-experimental pre- and post-intervention design was used. One thousand and thirty-two professionals received an information intervention designed to improve mental health literacy (MHL) and confidence in providing help to people with psychosis. Seven hundred and fifty-five participants completed the Psychosis Information and Confidence Questionnaire pre- and post-intervention. The information intervention significantly improved participants': (1) knowledge of psychosis; (2) ability to recognize signs and symptoms of psychosis; (3) awareness of how to access services; and (4) confidence in providing help to people experiencing psychosis. Findings provide promising support for the intervention's feasibility and acceptability. The intervention enhanced MHL regarding psychosis among professionals in contact with young people. Further research assessing if such improvements translate to the facilitation of appropriate help seeking, the enhanced early detection of psychosis and a reduction of the duration of untreated psychosis is required.

PMID: 28102617 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Health Literacy

Medical Professionals' Review of YouTube Videos Pertaining to Exercises for the Constipation Relief.

Mind-Body Medicine - Sat, 2019-06-08 06:43
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Medical Professionals' Review of YouTube Videos Pertaining to Exercises for the Constipation Relief.

Korean J Gastroenterol. 2018 Dec 25;72(6):295-303

Authors: Lee TH, Kim SE, Park KS, Shin JE, Park SY, Ryu HS, Kim JW, Lee YJ, Cho YS, Park S, Constipation Research Group of The Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility

Abstract
Background/Aims: The primary aims of this study were to evaluate the content quality of YouTube videos on exercises to help relieve constipation and to assess whether the video source, exercise types, and popularity affected their quality.
Methods: Eight gastroenterologists independently evaluated the exercises presented in the constipation YouTube videos for seven items: image quality, usefulness in relieving constipation (quality 1), usefulness for general physical health (quality 2), difficulty in following, activity intensity, fun, and overall quality. Raters were asked open-ended questions to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the videos. Five-point ordinal scales were used to score each item aforementioned, with the exception of image quality and overall quality that used a six-point Likert scale.
Results: The 20 videos had a mean length of 268 seconds and a mean viewership of 32,694. The most common video source was commercial (n=10), and the most common type of physical activity was yoga (n=11). The median values of image quality, quality 1, quality 2, difficulty in following, activity intensity, fun, and overall quality were 3, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, and 2, respectively. Yoga videos had significantly higher median quality 1 values (3) compared with massage videos (2, adjusted p=0.006) and 'others' videos (2, adjusted p<0.001). A lack of medical evidence was the most common answer to open-ended questions about the weaknesses of each video.
Conclusions: Overall, YouTube exercise videos presented a low-quality content. This study highlights the need for evidence-based comprehensive educational videos addressing exercises for treating constipation.

PMID: 30642148 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

How does education lead to healthier behaviours? Testing the mediational roles of perceived control, health literacy and social support.

Health Literacy - Fri, 2019-06-07 12:41
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How does education lead to healthier behaviours? Testing the mediational roles of perceived control, health literacy and social support.

Psychol Health. 2018 11;33(11):1416-1429

Authors: Park CL, Cho D, Moore PJ

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Educational attainment is increasingly recognised as a unique dimension of socioeconomic status (SES) and a powerful determinant of health behaviour-and thus physical health and mortality. However, very little is known about the specific pathways through which education influences these health behaviours.
DESIGN: The present study used a nationally representative US survey to test three potential psychosocial pathways (perceived control, health literacy and social support) through which education might influence intake of fruits and vegetables (FV), physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviour (SB), controlling for other aspects of SES (income, health insurance status) and demographics (age, gender, race/ethnicity).
RESULTS: Both aspects of perceived control (locus of control, cancer fatalism) mediated the impact of education on FV and PA while only locus of control mediated the impact of education on SB. Further, only one aspect of health literacy (ability to understand recommendations) mediated education's effect on any health behaviour (FV). Social support did not mediate any of the effects of education on health behaviors.
CONCLUSION: Future work explicitly assessing and testing these mediational pathways is needed to better understand how education influences people's health behaviours throughout their lives.

PMID: 30450977 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Health Literacy

Shoe-mounted accelerometers should be used with caution in gait retraining.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-06-07 12:41
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Shoe-mounted accelerometers should be used with caution in gait retraining.

Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Jun;29(6):835-842

Authors: Cheung RTH, Zhang JH, Chan ZYS, An WW, Au IPH, MacPhail A, Davis IS

Abstract
Real-time biofeedback gait retraining has been reported to be an effective intervention to lower the impact loading during gait. While many of the previous gait retraining studies have utilized a laboratory-based setup, some studies used accelerometers affixed at the distal tibia to allow training outside the laboratory environment. However, many commercial sensors for gait modification are shoe-mounted. Hence, this study sought to compare impact loading parameters measured by shoe-mounted and tibia sensors in participants before and after a course of walking or running retraining using signal source from the shoe-mounted sensors. We also compared the correlations between peak positive acceleration measured at shoe (PPAS ) and tibia (PPAT ) and vertical loading rates, as these loading rates have been related to injury. Twenty-four and 14 participants underwent a 2-week visual biofeedback walking and running retraining, respectively. Participants in the walking retraining group experienced lower PPAS following the intervention (P < 0.005). However, they demonstrated no change in PPAT (P = 0.409) nor vertical loading rates (P > 0.098) following the walking retraining. In contrast, participants in the running retraining group experienced a reduction in the PPAT (P = 0.001) and vertical loading rates (P < 0.013) after running retraining. PPAS values were four times that of PPAT for both walking and running suggesting an uncoupling of the shoe with tibia. As such, PPAS was not correlated with vertical loading rates for either walking or running, while significant correlations between PPAT and vertical loading rates were noted. The present study suggests potential limitations of the existing commercial shoe-mounted sensors.

PMID: 30693580 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Current state of the use of neuroimaging techniques to understand and alter appetite control in humans.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-06-07 12:41
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Current state of the use of neuroimaging techniques to understand and alter appetite control in humans.

Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2018 09;21(5):329-335

Authors: Spetter MS

Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: It is in the brain where the decision is made what and how much to eat. In the last decades neuroimaging research has contributed extensively to new knowledge about appetite control by revealing the underlying brain processes. Interestingly, there is the fast growing idea of using these methods to develop new treatments for obesity and eating disorders. In this review, we summarize the findings of the importance of the use of neuropharmacology and neuroimaging techniques in understanding and modifying appetite control.
RECENT FINDINGS: Appetite control is a complex interplay between homeostatic, hedonic, and cognitive processes. Administration of the neuropeptides insulin and oxytocin curb food intake and alter brain responses in reward and cognitive control areas. Additionally, these areas can be targeted for neuromodulation or neurofeedback to reduce food cravings and increase self-control to alter food intake.
SUMMARY: The recent findings reveal the potential of intranasal administration of hormones or modifying appetite control brain networks to reduce food consumption in volunteers with overweight and obesity or individuals with an eating disorder. Although long-term clinical studies are still needed.

PMID: 29927764 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Essentials of essential oils.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-06-07 12:41
Related Articles

Essentials of essential oils.

Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2017 May 01;74(9):e153-e162

Authors: Manion CR, Widder RM

Abstract
PURPOSE: Information to guide clinicians in educating and advising patients using or intending to use essential oils for self-administered aromatherapy or other medicinal purposes is presented.
SUMMARY: The term essential oils refers to highly concentrated, aromatic oils extracted from plants by steam distillation, hydrodiffusion, or pressure. Market reports indicate strong growth in the use of essential oils in the United States in recent decades. Therapeutic claims made in the marketing of essential oils have led the Food and Drug Administration to caution a number of suppliers. Along with rapid growth in sales of essential oils to consumers there has been an increase in the amount of published evidence regarding aromatherapy and essential oils; the annual number of relevant articles indexed using Medical Subject Headings terminology has doubled since 2004. In order to help ensure proper application and safe use of essential oils as a self-care modality, healthcare professionals can benefit from a general knowledge of the terminology and foundational concepts of medicinal use of essential oils, as well as resources to facilitate evaluations of appropriateness of use.
CONCLUSION: Because of the increasing popularity of essential oils and the prevalence of essential oil-based self-care practices targeting a wide variety of ailments in the United States, healthcare professionals must be prepared to address concerns about the agents' safety and efficacy. Proper literature evaluation requires the ability to discern the quality of an oil, the safety of administration, and the validity of its use.

PMID: 28438819 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Using real-time fMRI neurofeedback to restore right occipital cortex activity in patients with left visuo-spatial neglect: proof-of-principle and preliminary results.

Mind-Body Medicine - Fri, 2019-06-07 12:41
Related Articles

Using real-time fMRI neurofeedback to restore right occipital cortex activity in patients with left visuo-spatial neglect: proof-of-principle and preliminary results.

Neuropsychol Rehabil. 2019 Apr;29(3):339-360

Authors: Robineau F, Saj A, Neveu R, Van De Ville D, Scharnowski F, Vuilleumier P

Abstract
Hemineglect is common after right parietal stroke, characterised by impaired awareness for stimuli in left visual space, with suppressed neural activity in the right visual cortex due to losses in top-down attention signals. Here we sought to assess whether hemineglect patients are able to up-regulate their right visual cortex activity using auditory real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback. We also examined any effect of this training procedure on neglect severity. Two different neurofeedback methods were used. A first group of six patients was trained to up-regulate their right visual cortex activity and a second group of three patients was trained to control interhemispheric balance between their right and left visual cortices. Over three sessions, we found that the first group successfully learned to control visual cortex activity and showed mild reduction in neglect severity, whereas the second group failed to control the feedback and showed no benefit. Whole brain analysis further indicated that successful up-regulation was associated with a recruitment of bilateral fronto-parietal areas. These findings provide a proof of concept that rt-fMRI neurofeedback may offer a new approach to the rehabilitation of hemineglect symptoms, but further studies are needed to identify effective regulation protocols and determine any reliable impact on clinical symptoms.

PMID: 28385053 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Health literacy and health promotion challenges in performing arts medicine.

Health Literacy - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
Related Articles

Health literacy and health promotion challenges in performing arts medicine.

Med Probl Perform Art. 2019 Mar;34(1):61-62

Authors: Ackermann BJ

Abstract
In recent years, the role of health literacy in determining appropriate attitudes and behaviours to health has received extensive attention. According to the World Health Organisation, health literacy refers to the ability of individuals to access, understand, and use information in ways which promote and maintain good health for themselves, their families, and their communities. It has been increasingly recognised that this information should be tailored to the specific needs of the community (e.g., performing artists) to empower them to take an active role in improving their own health outcomes. One concern recognised for well over a decade now has been the challenge for non-health-trained individuals to recognise what is reliable when searching through the highly variable sources of "health information" published on the internet.

PMID: 31152657 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Health Literacy

Assessing health literacy among older adults living in subsidized housing: a cross-sectional study.

Health Literacy - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
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Assessing health literacy among older adults living in subsidized housing: a cross-sectional study.

Can J Public Health. 2018 06;109(3):401-409

Authors: Agarwal G, Habing K, Pirrie M, Angeles R, Marzanek F, Parascandalo J

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess functional health literacy levels among older adults living in subsidized housing in Hamilton, Ontario, and to assess the relationships between health literacy and other important health indicators, such as education level, age, ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), and self-reported health status.
METHODS: Older adults (n = 237) living in subsidized housing buildings in Hamilton, ON, were assessed using the NVS-UK as a measure of functional health literacy in addition to a health indicator questionnaire through structured interview. Health literacy levels were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression to determine relationships between health literacy levels and other health indicators.
RESULTS: Participants' mean age was 73 years, 67% were female, 70% were not educated beyond high school, and 91% were white. Over 82% of participants had below adequate health literacy levels using the NVS-UK. Multivariable logistic regression revealed significant relationships between functional health literacy and BMI, education level, and pain and discomfort levels. No significant relationships were found between health literacy level and age group, anxiety and depression levels, CANRISK (Diabetes risk) score, gender, marital status, mobility issues, self-care issues, self-reported health status, or performance of usual activities.
CONCLUSIONS: As the population of older adults continues to grow, the appropriate resources must be available to both improve and support the health literacy level of the population. Future health research should gather information on the health literacy levels of target populations to ensure more equitable health service. This research provides a significant opportunity to better understand populations with health literacy barriers.

PMID: 29981094 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Health Literacy

Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions-Reply.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
Related Articles

Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions-Reply.

JAMA. 2019 05 21;321(19):1939

Authors: Wallis CJD, Detsky AS, Fan E

PMID: 31112256 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
Related Articles

Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions.

JAMA. 2019 05 21;321(19):1938

Authors: Dewar B, Shamy M

PMID: 31112251 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
Related Articles

Need for Randomized Trials to Support Procedural Interventions.

JAMA. 2019 05 21;321(19):1937-1938

Authors: Sharma S, Traeger AC, Harris I

PMID: 31112250 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Psychological Treatments for IBS in Gastroenterology Settings: Promising but in Need of Further Study.

Mind-Body Medicine - Thu, 2019-06-06 06:37
Related Articles

A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Psychological Treatments for IBS in Gastroenterology Settings: Promising but in Need of Further Study.

Dig Dis Sci. 2018 09;63(9):2189-2201

Authors: Thakur ER, Shapiro J, Chan J, Lumley MA, Cully JA, Bradford A, El-Serag HB

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Psychological treatments are efficacious for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in clinical trials; however, their effectiveness when conducted in gastroenterology practice settings is unclear.
AIM: To perform a systematic review of the types and effects of psychological treatments for IBS conducted in gastroenterology clinics.
METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane central register. Studies conducted in gastroenterology clinic settings with IBS patients who were clinically referred from gastroenterology were included.
RESULTS: We identified 3078 citations, of which only eight studies were eligible. Seven studies compared psychological treatments (average n = 25.7; range 12-43) to controls (average n = 25.4 patients; range 12-47), whereas one study compared two active "bonafide" interventions. Psychological treatments varied (cognitive-behavioral therapy, guided affective imagery, mindfulness, hypnosis, biofeedback, emotional awareness training). However, across approaches, short-term benefits were seen. IBS symptoms improved significantly among patients in cognitive and behavioral therapies, mindfulness-based stress reduction, guided affective imagery, and emotional awareness training compared with controls; there was a similar trend for gut-directed hypnotherapy. Similarly, IBS symptoms improved in a study of two active biofeedback and hypnosis treatments.
CONCLUSIONS: Evidence for the effectiveness of psychological treatment in gastroenterology practice is promising but limited. Study designs that involve a blending of efficacy and effectiveness components are needed.

PMID: 29744772 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: Mind Body Medicine

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